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Recent Speaker Design Articles

Sound Bars with Chip-Based Technology Bridge Gap

Sound Bars with Chip-Based Technology Bridge Gap

High-quality audio is a critical part of creating a compelling home theater product line. With the availability of six- and eight-channel surround sound systems, consumers expect movie theater quality sound in their living rooms and bedrooms from their televisions. New Silicon-on-Chip Designs promise better and cheaper sound bar technology to fill the gap for those who can't build out full 5.1 systems.

High-quality audio is a critical part of creating a compelling home theater product line. With the availability of six- and eight-channel surround sound systems, consumers expect movie theater

Claus Neesgaard , Vineet Ganju — June 26, 2008 08:52 in Loudspeaker Design

Dayton Audio WT3 Woofer Tester Review

Dayton Audio WT3 Woofer Tester Review

The WT3 Woofer Tester by Dayton Audio is a fast, accurate and affordable measurement tool that’s about as easy to use as it gets. Just load the included software, plug the probe into the nearest USB port, calibrate, and you’re good to go. It’s that simple! It’ll measure driver impedance and derive the all-important Thiele/Small parameters - critical to the loudspeaker design process. It will also measure the impedance of various components commonly used in the construction of passive crossover networks such as resistors, caps & inductors. Rounding out this feature set, the WT3 sports some useful extra utilities you’ll likely find handy. All in all, this is one item likely to be a favorite of the DIY community for a long time to come.

The WT3 Woofer Tester by Dayton Audio is a fast, accurate and affordable measurement tool that’s about as easy to use as it gets. Just load the included software, plug the probe into the nearest USB

— April 17, 2008 18:50 in Loudspeaker Design

Audioholics Subwoofer Measurement Standard Part I

Audioholics Subwoofer Measurement Standard Part I

When it comes time to size up a subwoofer's performance, the proof is in the measurement! Audioholics takes a hard look at the science of subwoofer measurements in a two-part series covering a broad spectrum of measurement methods, useful to both pro and enthusiast alike. The purpose of both documents are to present a set of measurement guidelines by which a comprehensive objective assessment of a subwoofer’s performance can be developed. Included within this document’s definition of a subwoofer are: single & multiple driver subwoofer systems; powered and passive systems; systems featuring vented or totally enclosed cabinets; along with less common items such as dipole subwoofers. Let the science begin!"

When it comes time to size up a subwoofer's performance, the proof is in the measurement! Audioholics takes a hard look at the science of subwoofer measurements in a two-part series covering a broad

— March 05, 2008 13:00 in Loudspeaker Design

Subwoofer Measurement Tactics: A Brief, Topical Overview & Method Comparison

Subwoofer Measurement Tactics: A Brief, Topical Overview & Method Comparison

You often see us measuring subwoofers using various methods such as: groundplane, in-room nearfield, outdoor on a pole, anechoic, quasi anechoic, etc in our product reviews and technical articles. This article discusses the different approaches to measuring subwoofers as well as tabulates the pros and cons of each method. Depending on the resources on hand of the reviewer, we will typically apply one or more of these methods and will note them as such in the reviews. The idea here is to eliminate external influences that complicate the measurements to yield similarly correct results for each methodology employed. The scope of this overview is limited to subwoofers only and the amplitude response frequencies range of 10 Hz to 320 Hz.

You often see us measuring subwoofers using various methods such as: groundplane, in-room nearfield, outdoor on a pole, anechoic, quasi anechoic, etc in our product reviews and technical articles.

— November 05, 2007 23:50 in Loudspeaker Design

Speaker Spikes and Cones – What’s the point?

Speaker Spikes and Cones – What’s the point?

In recent years it has become common for items of audio equipment to be mounted using “spikes” or “cones”. These come in all sorts of shapes, sizes, and materials, at all kinds of prices. The Hi-Fi magazines sometimes ‘review’ these accessories, and recommend their use. However, are they worth buying and using? In this article, we consider their use with loudspeakers, and discuss some alternatives.

In recent years it has become common for items of audio equipment to be mounted using “spikes” or “cones”. These come in all sorts of shapes, sizes, and materials, at all kinds of prices. The Hi-Fi

Jim Lesurf — September 18, 2007 16:28 in Loudspeaker Design

Vertical vs Horizontal Center Speaker Designs

Vertical vs Horizontal Center Speaker Designs

The center channel’s job is a tough one. The consensus is that around 75 percent of a movie’s content is routed to the center channel loudspeaker. Yet, the design criteria for center channels traditionally require that it fit as stealthily as possible around that big-box television, or that huge sheet of projection screen. The sound can’t go through your glass TV screen and projection screens are usually not acoustically transparent. Ideally, the sound should come from behind the image, through the screen as it does in the movie theaters. But while there are new options with acoustically transparent projection screens, this article will focus on the more traditional problem of what compromises result from the different approaches to center channel design.

This article discusses performance tradeoffs of vertically vs horizontally mounted drivers in center channel speakers. We show how off-axis lobing can negatively affect performance of horizontal MTMs.

Chris Seymour — July 20, 2007 11:55 in Loudspeaker Design

Loudspeaker Impedance, Series & Parallel Connection Basics

Loudspeaker Impedance, Series & Parallel Connection Basics

More often than not a question pops up in our forum about speaker impedance and the result of connecting multiple speakers to a single amplifier. Thus we have prepared this introductory tutorial to help clear up some of these questions. We show you the math and SPL comparative differences of wiring loudspeakers in series vs parallel and the pros and cons of each connection method.

This article discusses Loudspeaker Impedance and the load an amplifier sees if you wire speakers in series or parallel. We discuss the math and expected SPL differences as well as pros/cons of each.

— May 21, 2006 19:00 in Loudspeaker Design

Inductor Coil Crosstalk Basics

Inductor Coil Crosstalk Basics

As a fledgling electronics buff I gathered together the usual hodgepodge of spare parts, old TV's and all the other electrical odds and ends that youngsters bitten by that particular bug seems to collect. Among my most prized possessions were 2 25 lb. spools of insulated, 12 AWG copper wire. Their weighty status didn't spare them however from featuring in many of my early experiments.

As a fledgling electronics buff I gathered together the usual hodgepodge of spare parts, old TV's and all the other electrical odds and ends that youngsters bitten by that particular bug seems to

— March 05, 2006 19:00 in Loudspeaker Design

Speaker Break In: Fact or Fiction?

Speaker Break In: Fact or Fiction?

Driver "break in", "burn in" or "run in" is a topic that's been debated in various forums for years. This topic continues to ignite occasional flame wars, fueled by the contributions of both uninformed and enlightened alike.

Driver "break in", "burn in" or "run in" is a topic that's been debated in various forums for years. This topic continues to ignite occasional flame wars, fueled by the contributions of both

— August 24, 2005 20:00 in Loudspeaker Design

Lowering Mechanical Noise Floor in Speakers Pt 2

Lowering Mechanical Noise Floor in Speakers Pt 2

The mechanical & acoustical performance of a loudspeaker cabinet's panel will be assessed at various stages of construction, with an eye to noting any improvements along the way. This report will conclude with a simple before/after comparison of the acoustical output of one of the test cabinet's panels, followed by a subjective assessment of the system's performance.

The mechanical & acoustical performance of a loudspeaker cabinet's panel will be assessed at various stages of construction, with an eye to noting any improvements along the way. This report will

— July 04, 2005 20:00 in Loudspeaker Design

Lowering Mechanical Noise Floor in Speakers

Lowering Mechanical Noise Floor in Speakers

When I design a loudspeaker system for home or studio use, with the goal of maximizing sonic accuracy, there are a handful of key areas I focus on when it comes time to judge how successful the design is.

When I design a loudspeaker system for home or studio use, with the goal of maximizing sonic accuracy, there are a handful of key areas I focus on when it comes time to judge how successful the

— March 16, 2005 19:00 in Loudspeaker Design

Understanding Loudspeaker Frequency Response

Understanding Loudspeaker Frequency Response

When I look at Infinity, then Axiom, then Paradigm, and then Rocket, I can't see any consistency with the frequency range and the price. How can a speaker with a frequency range of 60-20,000 Hz cost four times as much as a speaker that has a rating of 30-20,000 Hz?

When I look at Infinity, then Axiom, then Paradigm, and then Rocket, I can't see any consistency with the frequency range and the price. How can a speaker with a frequency range of 60-20,000 Hz cost

Alan Lofft — March 10, 2005 19:00 in Loudspeaker Design

Wireless Surround Sound Speakers - The Future?

Wireless Surround Sound Speakers - The Future?

Are wireless surround sound speakers the next big thing? Hong Kong leads the market in the release of wireless 5.1 speaker systems. Wireless and active surround sound speakers with built-in decoders appear to be topping the list of R & D expenditures in various Chinese technology manufacturing companies.

Are wireless surround sound speakers the next big thing? Hong Kong leads the market in the release of wireless 5.1 speaker systems. Wireless and active surround sound speakers with built-in decoders

— October 14, 2004 20:00 in Loudspeaker Design

Loudspeakers: When Is Good Enough, Enough? Part 3

Loudspeakers: When Is Good Enough, Enough? Part 3

In this, Part 3 in the series, I'd like my 30+ year journey through speaker design to illustrate how much of the knowledge was gained over long periods, by testing combinations and by following what others were doing to improve their systems. Hopefully it will become apparent that the journey of our industry in audio has been and continues to be an ever-fascinating learning experience…

In this, Part 3 in the series, I'd like my 30+ year journey through speaker design to illustrate how much of the knowledge was gained over long periods, by testing combinations and by following what

Patrick Hart — September 05, 2004 19:00 in Loudspeaker Design