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Recent Room Acoustics Articles

Anthem ARC Room EQ Interview with Dr. Peter Schuck and Nick Platsis

Anthem ARC Room EQ Interview with Dr. Peter Schuck and Nick Platsis

Continuing our investigation of the various room correction (aka Room EQ) products on the market, we had a chat with Anthem's Nick Platsis and Dr. Peter Schuck who were kind enough to answer our questions. Anthem's Room Correction or ARC, is found exclusively in Anthem's MRX receivers and their AVM and D2 series Preamp processors. How does ARC work? Why does Anthem limit room correction to 5 kHz? Read the article to find out. Updated on 10/08/14 with more detailed Q&A pertaining to bass management and EQ functionality.

ARC Auto EQ: Today the Audioholics had a chat with Anthem's Nick Platsis to get the inside scoop on Anthem Room Correction (ARC). Click to learn all about ARC the wonders of great EQ.

— October 08, 2014 07:00 in Room Acoustics

Tip of the Day: Sound Isolation For Your Home Theater

Tip of the Day: Sound Isolation For Your Home Theater

Today's tip of the day can be summed up in two words: sound isolation. Not only does this keep you from disturbing others (handy if you're watching a movie at night), but it also serves to reduce the amount of external noise that leaks into your room. We cover four techniques to help isolate your A/V system from the rest of the world: mass, absorption, decoupling, and damping. Want to know more? Click to read the full article.

Acoustics: Today's tip of the day can be summed up in two words: sound isolation. It helps keep you from disturbing others, and reduces the noise floor in your room. Win-win!

— September 05, 2014 08:00 in Room Acoustics

Audyssey MultEQ Room Correction Interview With Chris Kyriakakis

Audyssey MultEQ Room Correction Interview With Chris Kyriakakis

Most readers of Audioholics are probably familiar with auto-calibration systems like Audyssey MultEQ. They make your lives easier by measuring and compensating for your speaker's relative distance and levels, as well as their in-room response. Beyond that basic description, these systems are a bit of a mystery. Today we aim to start lifting the veil of secrecy. We peppered Chris Kyriakakis of Audyssey with questions, and he was kind enough to give us the inside scoop on just what MultEQ can do. Click to read all the details.

The Audioholics interview Chris Kyriakakis in order to learn the ins and outs of Audyssey's MultEQ room correction / auto-calibration system. Bass management, calibration, EQ and more.

— August 24, 2014 10:00 in Room Acoustics

The Decibel (dB) Scale & Audio Rules 101

The Decibel (dB) Scale & Audio Rules 101

For those looking to gain a deeper understanding of how audio works, whether to make better-informed decisions or simply for the sake of curiosity, it's useful to lay down some ground rules that govern how audio systems behave relating to loudness and the decibel. One of the most important concepts in audio is the decibel, the unit of measure denoting the ratio of a change in level, whether that level is acoustic Sound Pressure Level (SPL) or electrical signal level. It’s abbreviated dB. As you may or may not be aware, the decibel (dB) scale is a logarithmic system, as opposed to a linear scale. Being aware of the relationships inherent in this scale is important for a variety of reasons, which will hopefully become clear by the time you reach the end of this article. We also discuss how the human hear perceives double loudness differently depending on frequency so +6dB increase in SPL may not seem like such a big deal at 1kHz but at 20-30Hz it certainly is. Read on to find out why.

This article discusses the relationship between the decibel(dB) for audio devices that produce sound and how we perceive loudness. Basic audio rules are given to relating to the decibel.

— December 31, 2012 13:20 in Room Acoustics

Home Acoustics Alliance Level II Workshop

Home Acoustics Alliance Level II Workshop

If you are a Home Theater Specialist I urge you to take HAA Level II training. If you are a theater enthusiast and want your system to sound better, don’t throw money at the equipment, put it into an HAA certified professional. The same goes if you are a two-channel stereo audiophile. Audiophiles always seem ready to purchase better and better equipment to perfect their sound system, which I am not trying to discourage, but they tend to disregard the proper room setup and calibration. Whatever place you take in this ever-changing audio world the one thing that stays the same is the physics of acoustics and HAA is the avenue for optimizing small rooms.

HAA Level II training provided an avenue for advanced home theater calibration techniques that benefit the home theater enthusiast and two-channel audiophile alike. Highly Recommended.

— August 15, 2010 21:30 in Room Acoustics

Listening Room Acoustics: Room Modes & Standing Waves Part I

Listening Room Acoustics: Room Modes & Standing Waves Part I

Room modes cause standing waves that can cause three acoustical problems: a level boost at some frequencies, an extent of the duration of sound at those same frequencies (resonance) and some profound dips at other frequencies. This article explores methods of reducing the problems of standing waves in your home theater room and also works real world examples for greater clarity. Don’t settle for acoustical compromises. Learn the facts, and arm yourself with the right tools to enhance your movie watching and music listening experiences.

Dealing with standing waves in small room acoustics is a must for better bass. This can be done with bass traps or multi-sub or a combo of both.

Michel Leduc — June 29, 2009 19:00 in Room Acoustics

Bass Trapping Ideas for Non-Ideal Spaces

Bass Trapping Ideas for Non-Ideal Spaces

Bass traps control low frequency issues in rooms. Simply, they are the single most effective investment toward a quality audio experience that is rarely made by the home theater enthusiast. The information contained within this article may not allow you to unleash your own plan for optimal bass trapping, but it may point you towards that result. Proper bass trapping is a 100% guaranteed investment and is worth a close look for those serious about achieving the best bass response their home theater systems have to offer.

Bass traps are an effective way of dealing with standing waves and other bass problems that plague small room acoustics. This article discusses the various types of LF bass traps.

Jeff Hedback — May 26, 2009 22:05 in Room Acoustics

How Does Listening Room Acoustics Affect Sound Quality?

How Does Listening Room Acoustics Affect Sound Quality?

Unfortunately, where sound quality is concerned, the acoustics of the listening room is rarely taken into account. Indeed, most people opt for expensive, top of the range sound systems in an attempt to reach the best-possible sound quality. But they often ignore one essential thing: the acoustics of the listening room itself. As a sound system is used in an enclosed space ‘a listening room’, the acoustical conditions of that room will inevitably take control over the sound quality. This article focuses on the main acoustical problems of the listening room and how they can deteriorate the perceived sound.

This article discusses how room acoustics affect sound quality including standing waves, early reflections and how to deal with them to optimize the sound of your home theater listening space.

Michel Leduc — April 12, 2009 22:15 in Room Acoustics

Twenty Questions Toward a Correct Home Theater Room

Twenty Questions Toward a Correct Home Theater Room

Let’s get right to it. You love audio, are passionate about your system and are always searching for a better experience, a more accurate response. You’ve heard the term “room correction”. You’ve heard speakers in various rooms, you are aware of acoustical treatments and active room correction systems (ARC). You know that your dedicated audio system is not in a purpose built room. You would like to make the room as “correct” as possible; however you have no clear idea what approach is best for your room. This article explores the 20 questions you should ask yourself towards building a great room along with feedback from leading industry experts within their own respected disciplines on this topic.

Let’s get right to it. You love audio, are passionate about your system and are always searching for a better experience, a more accurate response. You’ve heard the term “room correction”. You’ve

Jeff Hedback — December 08, 2007 19:00 in Room Acoustics

Building Great Bass Response In Your Home Theater

Building Great Bass Response In Your Home Theater

If you are searching for the utmost listening experience in your room with your system it is time you consider how your space is constructed. It is the purpose of this article to show you how the construction relates to your audio experience. There is an inverse relation between sound isolation (STC) and sound absorption (NRC). The greater the isolation of a surface the more sound energy is going to remain in that space. This applies directly below 200 Hz where the resonance of room modes is a primary factor of your systems character. It becomes compounded when you add multiple sound sources with low frequency information…you got it, your room.

If you are searching for the utmost listening experience in your room with your system it is time you consider how your space is constructed. It is the purpose of this article to show you how the

Jeff Hedback — May 20, 2007 22:47 in Room Acoustics

Active Room Correction: A Primer to Audyssey MultEQ Pro

Active Room Correction: A Primer to Audyssey MultEQ Pro

Audyssey's Sound Equalizer is the company's first branded, flagship statement product. In working with the MultEQ Pro software over the last couple of months it has become apparent to this author that the ASE's power and flexibility can be best exploited, as far as overall system sound quality and balance are concerned, if careful attention is first paid to speaker selection, placement, and positioning. Often, passive room treatments, themselves carefully selected and placed are also recommended.

Audyssey's Sound Equalizer is the company's first branded, flagship statement product. In working with the MultEQ Pro software over the last couple of months it has become apparent to this author

Patrick Hart — September 30, 2006 20:00 in Room Acoustics

HAA Level I Certification Training Course Overview

HAA Level I Certification Training Course Overview

This article is about HAA certification training and it also contains some great information on home acoustics from the course which I have included in this article. You may find that even a few tidbits of information can make drastic sonic improvements to your system.

This article is about HAA certification training and it also contains some great information on home acoustics from the course which I have included in this article. You may find that even a few

— June 27, 2006 20:00 in Room Acoustics

A New Way to Think About Room Acoustics

A New Way to Think About Room Acoustics

I often have people ask me some very basic overall questions about the acoustical design of a room, such as: how much will it cost, what will it look like, how much better is it going to sound? All of these are important questions and sometimes it's difficult to give someone an answer that's easily understood.

I often have people ask me some very basic overall questions about the acoustical design of a room, such as: how much will it cost, what will it look like, how much better is it going to sound?

rives — May 06, 2006 20:00 in Room Acoustics

Bass Traps for Home Theater - Not Just for Fisherman!

Bass Traps for Home Theater - Not Just for Fisherman!

If you ask most audiophiles to describe the main acoustic problem in their listening rooms, they'll probably tell you there's too much ambience and echoes. Or perhaps they'll report that stereo imaging is poor, most likely due to early reflections off the side walls and ceilings. Indeed, everyone "knows" that to test the acoustics of a room you simply walk around and clap your hands while listening for reverb and echoes. But to my way of thinking a far more important problem occurs at low frequencies, and you'll never hear that with hand claps. Let's first take a step back and consider the bigger picture.

How can you deal with bass problems in small rooms to provide a more uniform response for each listening seat? Passive room treatments such as bass traps is one way which we discuss here.

Ethan Winer — November 24, 2005 08:00 in Room Acoustics