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Anthem AVM 60 Preamp Processor Review: Conclusion

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Anthem AVM 60 3/4 View

Anthem's AVM 60 preamp processor could be considered a high end bargain.

Anthem’s AVM 60 brings long-awaited immersive audio support to those who crave two-channel quality in a multi-channel preamp. Simply put, the AVM 60 is a sweet-sounding sonic powerhouse. Two-channel, multi-channel, or immersive audio are handled with all the finesse, detail, control, and emotion you’d expect in a high end preamp. Pair the AVM 60 with first-rate amplification and you’ll lose yourself over countless nights with any movie or artist you chose.

For custom installers, you might need to rely more on the feature set of home automation controllers to perform some of the things that the past AVM-series did natively. Oh, and should you encounter a minor bug here or there, you can rest assured that you’ll be backed by some of the best and most passionate support in the business. Considering that the AVM 60 is now $3,500 cheaper than it’s predecessor; adds more processing horse power; supports immersive audio; can stream hi-res music files; and comes with one of the best room correction solutions in the business, you might even consider it a bit of a high-end bargain.

Anthem AVM60 11.2CH AV Processor YouTube Review

The Score Card

The scoring below is based on each piece of equipment doing the duty it is designed for. The numbers are weighed heavily with respect to the individual cost of each unit, thus giving a rating roughly equal to:

Performance × Price Factor/Value = Rating

Audioholics.com note: The ratings indicated below are based on subjective listening and objective testing of the product in question. The rating scale is based on performance/value ratio. If you notice better performing products in future reviews that have lower numbers in certain areas, be aware that the value factor is most likely the culprit. Other Audioholics reviewers may rate products solely based on performance, and each reviewer has his/her own system for ratings.

Audioholics Rating Scale

  • StarStarStarStarStar — Excellent
  • StarStarStarStar — Very Good
  • StarStarStar — Good
  • StarStar — Fair
  • Star — Poor
MetricRating
Multi-channel Audio PerformanceStarStarStarStar
Two-channel Audio PerformanceStarStarStarStar
Network FeaturesStarStarStarStar
Bass ManagementStarStarStarStarStar
Build QualityStarStarStarStar
Fit and FinishStarStarStar
Ergonomics & UsabilityStarStarStarStar
Ease of SetupStarStarStarStar
FeaturesStarStarStar
Remote ControlStarStarStar
PerformanceStarStarStarStarhalf-star
ValueStarStarStarStar
About the author:
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Theo is a serious audiophile and home theater enthusiast—a passion he's enjoyed for over 20 years. He heads up many of our speaker system and receiver reviews as well as covering the latest in streaming technologies and Ultra HD video.

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Recent Forum Posts:

ellisr63 posts on October 22, 2019 12:46
A few questions…
1. How do you hookup the STR preamp to the Yamaha cxa5100, Does it get hooked up as an output or an input on the Yamaha?

2. Will this work if you are running biamped on your front 3 channels?

3. When you run YPAO on the Yamaha do you not run the front channels, or are you not running Athems room tune software?
Danzilla31 posts on October 08, 2019 14:59
Erod, post: 1343970, member: 89019
ARC Genesis sets my Dolby offset to -12 so the overall system baseline is based on 100dB.

The result is, my levels end up being around 62dB. I think it does this so that all my channels hover closer to 0. I generally get -3 or -4 with my fronts, and +2 to +6 with surrounds and ceiling atmos speakers. My sub ends up at around -5.

As a result, my volume control typically sits between -25 and -15, depending on source material.

Sounds awesome, but I've never had a room correction change my baseline off of 75dB like this. Genesis is the first to do that.
I just turned mine off did it all manual that's what I usually do with all my recievers although I ran Genesis multiple times it never changed my Dolby offset from 0

That's interesting it did that for your setup
Erod posts on October 08, 2019 14:52
ARC Genesis sets my Dolby offset to -12 so the overall system baseline is based on 100dB.

The result is, my levels end up being around 62dB. I think it does this so that all my channels hover closer to 0. I generally get -3 or -4 with my fronts, and +2 to +6 with surrounds and ceiling atmos speakers. My sub ends up at around -5.

As a result, my volume control typically sits between -25 and -15, depending on source material.

Sounds awesome, but I've never had a room correction change my baseline off of 75dB like this. Genesis is the first to do that.
Danzilla31 posts on October 07, 2019 13:33
VonMagnum, post: 1343782, member: 86028
If you ran room correction calibration, reference is normally 0.
Cool yes I did normally I am just fine with -35 if I want to get crazy max I can realistically handle is around -27 so I'm in good shape for where I want the room to be. Thanks!!!
VonMagnum posts on October 07, 2019 11:45
If you ran room correction calibration, reference is normally 0.
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