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Status Acoustics Voce Fina Bookshelf Speaker Measurements and Analysis

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The measurements were conducted in conformance with Audioholics Loudspeaker Measurements Standard

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  Status Voce Fina On-Axis Frequency Response

The on-axis frequency response was conducted with the measurement microphone at 1 meter with a 2.83V excitation signal. Audioholics measures sensitivity as the average sound pressure level (SPL) from 300 to 3kHz.  The Audioholics rated sensitivity for the Status loudspeaker is an average 87.6dB.  Given the close distance the measurements were taken at, the on-axis frequency response of this loudspeaker was highly dependent on microphone placement.  If the microphone was placed at the same height or above the tweeter a narrow but relatively deep null centered between 4kHz and 5kHz appeared.  Moving the microphone to between the tweeter and woofer reduced this issue in the response.  This measurement anomaly wasn’t as pronounced on the Status Decimo speaker since the woofer/tweeter were placed closer together.

The measurement technique used above involves removing all of the effects of a room.  The in-room bass response of the Status Granite loudspeaker with room gain should provide good bass response into the low 40Hz range.

Editorial Note About Measurement Dips by Steve Feinstein

The frequency response dips measured here are pretty typical. There is always an axis that produces the max SPL without interference. The dips are simply from off-axis phase cancellations between the drivers. This is the same thing that’s at work in a center-channel speaker with horizontally-arrayed drivers, except that the dips are now side-to-side, not up and down.

Most of this “problem” disappears in the far/reverberant field, where first-arrival is not as important as total radiated energy.

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Status Voce Fina Listening Window

The listening window response for the Status Voce Fina loudspeaker was conducted with a 2.83V input signal at 1 meter from 7 locations.  The measurement provides a picture of how the loudspeaker performs from seating locations that are not directly on axis with the speaker.  The top curve is the average of the other positions and provides an average of how the speaker performs throughout the listening area.  The listening window measurement is pretty uniform on the horizontal axis.  When moving 15 degrees above or below the speaker, large nulls appear between 2kHz and 5kHz though they weren’t audible during listening tests with normal program material.

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Status Voce Fina Polar Response

The dispersion characteristics of the Status Granite appear nearly perfectly matched.

The polar response graph shows how a loudspeaker performs at various seating positions in a room.  The polar response graph above is generated by measuring a loudspeaker at 7.5-degree intervals around a circle between the tweeter and woofer from 1 meter.  The Status Granite loudspeaker has the most uniform polar response I have ever measured.  This means as you move to different seating positions off axis, the characteristic of the sound does not drastically change.  Even at 30 degrees off-axis, the frequency response is relatively linear.  The polar response graph usually makes the mid-woofer to tweeter crossover point obvious as the dispersion characteristics of each driver is typically different.  The dispersion characteristics of the Status Granite appear nearly perfectly matched.  This pays huge dividends when the speaker is placed in a room that is less than perfect.

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Status Voce Fina Impedance

The impedance of the Status Voce Fina loudspeaker dips just below the IEC 6.4 ohm minimum but not by very much.  At frequencies below 4kHz, the speaker is safely above 8 ohms and should not present a problematic load for most amplifiers.  I suspect anyone purchasing a loudspeaker of this caliber can find the means to properly drive this loudspeaker.  The impedance graph above indicates the port tuning frequency is at approximately 45Hz.

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Status Voce Fina Harmonic Distortion

The harmonic distortion graph was generated using a 90dB stepped sinusoid sweep measured at 1 meter.  This test is the last test run on a loudspeaker since it really tortures loudspeakers.  Since this is a single 6.5” beryllium low frequency driver, the test was run from 45Hz to 20kHz.  From 45Hz to approximately 90Hz, substantial air turbulence was clearly audible from the leaky phase plug to cone interface.  While this may or may not be audible during normal playback, it is something that definitely is noticeable during testing.  The harmonic distortion measurement is average, even compared to some less expensive but well engineered loudspeakers.  The audibility of harmonic distortion is a topic of ongoing debate.

 Editorial Note about Distortion Audibility by Steve Feinstein

THD tends to be relatively inaudible at higher levels in the bass, but easily audible at less than 1% in the midrange. There’s a big difference between distortion being “audible” and being “objectionable,” however. Much of that has to do with lower-order vs. higher-order spectral content. 2nd-order THD is rarely bothersome, but 5th-order THD or IM vs. THD is harsh.

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Status Voce Fina Cumulative Spectral Decay

Cumulative spectral decay is derived from the impulse response measurement made with a 90dB excitation signal at 1 meter.  The cumulative spectral decay shows how sound at various frequencies dies out as a function of time.  It is important to note that the left most ridge is not valid and is a product of the measurement technique.  The CSD for the Status Granite is excellent.  The ridge protruding between 4kHz and 5kHz is oddly the same place that we have vertical off axis issues.  However, the ridge dies out very quickly and definitely will not contribute to any sort of ringing.

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Status Voce Fina Group Delay

The group delay graph shows the rate of change of the slope of a loudspeaker’s phase.  As a rule of thumb, values below 1.6ms in the mid to high frequencies will likely not affect perception of sound quality.  Increasing group delay in the low frequencies is not as objectionable as it is in the mid to high frequency ranges. 

 

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Recent Forum Posts:

gene posts on December 23, 2015 20:40
frostbyte, post: 1109727, member: 9909
These things are spectacular and sound like heaven. I got suckered in from the listening experience. Can't wait to get them home!
Very cool. Maybe you can post some images of your Status Acoustics speakers here so we can share them on our FB page too
Irvrobinson posts on December 23, 2015 14:15
fmw, post: 1109807, member: 26848
I have to say the brand name is a turn off to me. I buy speakers for sound, not for status.

I agree, and many high-end audio products have obnoxious names. Like my own Revel Ultima Salon2s. All three names are silly, and a bit embarrassing when I tell people unfamiliar with them the name. Sometimes I wonder how such poor names pass scrutiny and get approval.
fmw posts on December 23, 2015 14:06
I have to say the brand name is a turn off to me. I buy speakers for sound, not for status.
AcuDefTechGuy posts on December 23, 2015 09:08
frostbyte, post: 1109727, member: 9909
These things are spectacular and sound like heaven. I got suckered in from the listening experience. Can't wait to get them home!
Wow, congrats!
frostbyte posts on December 23, 2015 02:40
These things are spectacular and sound like heaven. I got suckered in from the listening experience. Can't wait to get them home!
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