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Status Acoustics Titus 8T Floorstanding Speaker System Review

by December 10, 2012
Status Acoustics 8T Review

Status Acoustics 8T Review

  • Product Name: Titus 8T Floorstanding Speaker
  • Manufacturer: Status Acoustics
  • Performance Rating: StarStarStarStarStar
  • Value Rating: StarStarStarStar
  • Review Date: December 10, 2012 17:00
  • MSRP: $ 50k/pair
  • Buy Now
  • Product Description: Passive Modular 3-way design with ported bass module and sealed two-way satellite module

  • Frequency Response: 20Hz to 40kHz +-3dB

  • Sensitivity: 93dB (2.83V/1 meter)

  • Recommended Power: 50 - 1,000 watts

  • Drive Units: 1 - 1” (26mm) Pure Beryllium Dome Tweeter, 4 - 6.5” (165mm) Beryllium Alloy Cone Midrange, 3 - 10” (254mm) Aluminum Cone Woofers

  • Crossover Frequencies: 120Hz, 2,700Hz

  • System Impedance: 4-ohms

  • Wiring Capability: Tri-amp / Tri-wireable

  • Dimensions: 66” H x 27” W x 32” D (1,676mm H x 687mm W x 813mm D)

  • Weight: 345 lbs (143 kg)

Pros

  • Unparalleled audiophile performance
  • Sets an industry benchmark in cost no object loudspeaker design
  • Unique design breaks away from traditional box cabinet look
  • Speakers you can keep for life

Cons

  • Uber expensive
  • Very heavy
  • Spoils your sonic pallet
  • Challenging load impedance

 

Status Acoustics 8T Introduction

It isn't often that I review a product that fundamentally changes the way I listen and experience audio. Status Acoustics, the premier line of RBH Sound, has managed to do just that with their new flagship Titus 8T floorstanding loudspeaker system. The Status line-up is RBH's premier speaker brand which is fully designed and manufactured in Layton Utah. It's been nearly a decade since RBH Sound produced their Status Acoustics series of loudspeakers which I was introduced to with the wonderful Decimo's that still serve as my reference bookshelf speaker to this day. Since I've taken delivery of the Status 8T system, I've given up my nightly XBOX online gaming addiction and almost completely abandoned multi-channel music, let alone movie watching. The Status Acoustics 8T speaker system is truly transformational. Read on to find out why.

Status Acoustics 8T Video Review

The Status Titus 8T's showed up at my place in huge crates with a combined weight of 1,200 lbs that took the place of my car while I waited for help to unbox them. This was no easy chore, but what is when you're constantly seeking the very best in any hobby?

The Status 8T speaker system is a modular design consisting of separate left and right satellite and bass modules connected via a very clever bracketing system. Each bass module houses three (3) high excursion 10” aluminum drivers and each satellite module contains four (4) 6½” Beryllium midrange drivers and a 1” Beryllium dome tweeter. Status Acoustics shipped the 8T's with the bracket that holds the speakers together connected to each bass unit. Status_crates.jpg

Fully assembled, the 8T weighs 345 lbs per speaker. The bass module weighs 175 lbs. and the satellite portion another 135 lbs. The bracket that holds them together weighs 35 lbs. It took four of us to hoist these speakers up my flight of steps to the Audioholics Showcase Theater room. The entire process made me question whether I will attempt to review such a large speaker ever again - reviewers in single-story houses definitely have the advantage here.

The primary design goal of the 8T speaker system, per Status Acoustics, is to produce true-to-life natural sound with realistic imaging characteristics and unrestricted dynamic range, while maintaining a small visual profile that is also aesthetically pleasing. Just what did they do to attempt to make this speaker system live up to such a claim? Let's take a tour of its design to find out.

About the author:

Gene manages this organization, establishes relations with manufacturers and keeps Audioholics a well oiled machine. His goal is to educate about home theater and develop more standards in the industry to eliminate consumer confusion clouded by industry snake oil.

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Recent Forum Posts:

haraldo posts on October 13, 2013 16:52
Rich Davis, post: 993231
I laughed for about 5 minutes after seeing that photograph. does the mfg of the test equipment instruct the user to move the speakers outdoors when performing those measurements? That's not a good methodology for testing a speaker, plus I would use the cables that the MFG recommends for their speakers when connecting to other components such as amps and pre amps. The reason is the mfg uses equipment/cables in their listening rooms when designing and testing their equipment, so they might have recommendations for obtaining similar test results.

It is insulting to my intelligence that a reviewer would take home audio speakers and move them outside to perform measurement tests. Every time I've been to an outdoor concert, wind has a HUGE factor on various frequencies, so I'm sure testing home audio systems outdoors is, well, kind of stupid, IMO. Aren't you supposed to use an anechoic chamber for those kinds of measurement tests instead?

The best way to measure speakers is probably in an anechoic chamber but the cost is prohibitive as in order to get good results way down in frequencies size of wedges and size of room must be enormous, I don't even comprehend what the cost is but it's probably way out of reach. lacking anechoic chamber, the outdoor testing is the only way to reliably measure a speaker I reckon, unless you want to measure the room modes and other influences of the room.

I guess Vandersteen Audio has facilities like this and for sure also Dunlavy Audio Labs used this as John Dunlavy could measure his speakers reliably in an anechoic chamber down below 20Hz…. I really don't see why Audhioholics should go the the step of putting so much money into this…. I believe what they do is industry leading and way better measurements than say… what they do in Stereophile, which is indoors at 50", many speakers don't integrate properly at such a short distance…. if Stereophile measures at bigger distance then room influence would take over…. There's been a wave of criticism from some manufacturers about this way of measuring, claiming that it just doesn't show reliably performance of some large array speakers…… I am not saying that it's this way or the other but just referring to what's been written and stated around Inet…

I reckon outdoors is way way better, Audioholics is the benchmark
gene posts on October 13, 2013 16:00
Rich Davis, post: 993231
I laughed for about 5 minutes after seeing that photograph. does the mfg of the test equipment instruct the user to move the speakers outdoors when performing those measurements? That's not a good methodology for testing a speaker, plus I would use the cables that the MFG recommends for their speakers when connecting to other components such as amps and pre amps. The reason is the mfg uses equipment/cables in their listening rooms when designing and testing their equipment, so they might have recommendations for obtaining similar test results.

It is insulting to my intelligence that a reviewer would take home audio speakers and move them outside to perform measurement tests. Every time I've been to an outdoor concert, wind has a HUGE factor on various frequencies, so I'm sure testing home audio systems outdoors is, well, kind of stupid, IMO. Aren't you supposed to use an anechoic chamber for those kinds of measurement tests instead?

I'll give you the benefit of a doubt seeing how you're a new member and obviously lacking in knowledge on measuring loudspeakers.

This speaker was measured both outdoors (for accuracy) and indoors (to see how they integrated into the room). The outdoor measurements most closely approximate an anechoic environment by removing all echos but the floor. A speaker this large would be difficult to measure anechoically even if we had access to a chamber due to its sheer size and capabilities down below 100Hz.

Outdoor measurements (aka, GP) are the best way to measure subwoofers which is not only an industry standard but it's also what we do. It has the advantage over anechoic since most anechoic chambers are too small and/or have insufficiently sized wedges to produce accurate results below 100Hz.

Hopefully you will will read up more on the subject matter before making such insulting and ignorant postings in the future.
fuzz092888 posts on October 13, 2013 15:12
Rich Davis, post: 993231
I laughed for about 5 minutes after seeing that photograph. does the mfg of the test equipment instruct the user to move the speakers outdoors when performing those measurements? That's not a good methodology for testing a speaker, plus I would use the cables that the MFG recommends for their speakers when connecting to other components such as amps and pre amps. The reason is the mfg uses equipment/cables in their listening rooms when designing and testing their equipment, so they might have recommendations for obtaining similar test results.

It is insulting to my intelligence that a reviewer would take home audio speakers and move them outside to perform measurement tests. Every time I've been to an outdoor concert, wind has a HUGE factor on various frequencies, so I'm sure testing home audio systems outdoors is, well, kind of stupid, IMO. Aren't you supposed to use an anechoic chamber for those kinds of measurement tests instead?

Outdoor testing is a perfectly viable way of gaining near anechoic measurements so long as you account for outdoor factors and don't test where it's noisy or on a windy day, gate your measurements appropriately, etc. If you don't know how to properly test speakers (based on your last sentence) then how can you criticize others on how it's being done? Besides, comparing being at an outdoor concert to what is being referenced is just silly. If you can't see why, then I'm not sure what to say.

As long as the cables aren't defective and are competently made they should perform near identically to higher priced cables. Although if you're buying these speakers I doubt you have any issue paying for Kimber Kable or the like.
Rich Davis posts on October 13, 2013 14:46
Why is there a test performed outdoors?

I laughed for about 5 minutes after seeing that photograph. does the mfg of the test equipment instruct the user to move the speakers outdoors when performing those measurements? That's not a good methodology for testing a speaker, plus I would use the cables that the MFG recommends for their speakers when connecting to other components such as amps and pre amps. The reason is the mfg uses equipment/cables in their listening rooms when designing and testing their equipment, so they might have recommendations for obtaining similar test results.

It is insulting to my intelligence that a reviewer would take home audio speakers and move them outside to perform measurement tests. Every time I've been to an outdoor concert, wind has a HUGE factor on various frequencies, so I'm sure testing home audio systems outdoors is, well, kind of stupid, IMO. Aren't you supposed to use an anechoic chamber for those kinds of measurement tests instead?
BoredSysAdmin posts on August 30, 2013 10:57
Weird, I clearly remember posting one of the first posts on this thread something like this: “Too bad Kimber cable interconnects weren't mentioned at all in the article” clearly referring to reoccurrence of Kimber brand 6 times on a single page.

Now I can't find that post anymore. hmmmm……
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