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Recent Speaker Setup Articles

7 Tips to Boost Wireless Speed, Range, and Reliability

7 Tips to Boost Wireless Speed, Range, and Reliability

Your wireless router on steroids! Wireless internet is awesome…When it’s fast, reliable, and has wide coverage that is. When the signal keeps dropping or the speed is so slow you might as well be on dial-up, it’s another story. Frustrating might be a mild description of the emotions a cruddy wireless network can evoke. Thankfully, there are a number of easy, and completely free, tricks to get your WiFi working like a champ. We wrote this guide so even those “technologically challenged” among us can run through it in a few minutes. From simply relocating the router, to installing hacked firmware, we'll get your WiFi signal so strong the entire neighborhood can eat up your bandwidth.

Boosting your wireless speed, range, and reliability is surprisingly simple. These 7 steps will help you set up a rock solid WiFi network and get the most out of a wireless router.

— June 23, 2013 13:05 in Home Theater Connection Help

How to Add Wireless to Ethernet Only Equipment

How to Add Wireless to Ethernet Only Equipment

Almost every piece of AV gear these days can connect to the internet. Even entry level products like a $250 AV receiver or $500 TV have some sort of internet capability, even if it's simply for firmware updates. However, just because something can connect to the internet doesn't mean that it's wireless. Sometimes you need WiFi because there is no way to get a hard wired Ethernet cable to your equipment. No fear, we've got a few quick tips to help make any of your Ethernet equipped gear breath new air with a strong and reliable WiFi signal.

Connecting equipment to a wireless network that lack built-in wireless is an easy task. With either a wireless bridge of Ethernet over powerline kit, you'll be up and running in no time.

— June 12, 2013 16:00 in Home Theater Connection Help

Connecting Up a Sound Bar to Enhance Your Flat Panel TV's Audio

Connecting Up a Sound Bar to Enhance Your Flat Panel TV's Audio

As video displays become thinner, and more people move towards high-performance home theaters, manufacturers are often de-prioritizing the built in sound in their televisions. In other words, if you want anything other than small, quiet, tinny sound, you’ll need an external solution. For folks that don’t want a complex system that takes up a lot of real estate, a soundbar is a good option. “Soundbar” is the generic name for a system with multiple driver arrays in a single enclosure. They are much wider than they are tall to provide a sense of stereo separation and to match the aesthetic of today’s widescreen TVs.

Connecting up a Sound Bar speaker can be a daunting task. We make it easier in this Soundbar Setup instructional video. Don't settle for poor sounding TV speakers. Install a Soundbar to your HDTV.

— March 18, 2013 20:30 in Home Theater Connection Help

AV Tip: How to Avoid Blowing Out Your Speakers

AV Tip: How to Avoid Blowing Out Your Speakers

Every so often some variation of this question gets asked on the Audioholics Forums, "Will I blow my speakers if I use amplifier X with speaker Y?" A good general answer is that so long as reasonable care is taken, odds are good your equipment will last for years to come. That is to say, if you detect strain or distortion, simply turn the volume down to the point where those problems go away. Bluntly, no you won't destroy your new speakers simply by the act of hooking them up to a receiver that can deliver something other than the exact amount of power they happen to be rated for, so go enjoy some tunes. Not satisfied yet? No problem, follow the few steps below to make sure your system stays rockin' for the long haul.

Every so often some variation of this question gets asked on the Audioholics Forums, "Will I blow my speakers if I use amplifer X with speaker Y?" Here are a few tips to keep your equipment safe.

— January 28, 2013 10:35 in Home Theater Connection Help

Tip of The Day: Mixing and Matching Speakers

Tip of The Day: Mixing and Matching Speakers

As a general rule, we do not recommend mixing and matching different brands of speakers in a surround sound system. Even mixing different lines within a particular brand can present problems. In order to maintain a reasonably consistent timbre (sonic signature) between different speakers, it's a good idea to have a matched system. Matching your front three speakers is most important, but if the manufacturer of your front speakers doesn't make a suitable surround speaker you can consider going with a different brand for surround speakers. Still, we recommend trying to stay within the same brand and series for all of your speakers. A notable exception to this rule is the subwoofer, which fills in the low end. In fact, there is rarely any reason to keep your subwoofer the same brand as your main speakers. There are several companies specializing in subwoofers, such as SVS, Hsu Research, Velodyne, Rythmik, and Power Sound Audio whose products have consistently proven to be better than many of the alternatives on the market.

As a general rule, we do not recommend mixing and matching different brands of speakers in a surround sound system. Even mixing different lines within a particular brand can present problems.

— January 23, 2013 21:15 in Home Theater Connection Help

AV Tip: Recess Your TV Outlets

AV Tip: Recess Your TV Outlets

Lots of people are starting to wall-mount their televisions, but with TVs getting thinner and thinner there are some challenges. One of the most common problems I've experienced has been power cord clearance. While HDMI cables can be made quite thin, often it's the power cord that obstinately sticks out of the TV and prevents you from tilting it properly or otherwise utilizing that new "ultra-slim" wall mount you just purchased. For many, the solution is to use a recessed power outlet when you (or your electrician) run the power for your TV.

Lots of people are starting to wall-mount their televisions, but with TVs getting thinner there are challenges. One of the most common problems I've experienced has been power cord clearance.

— December 27, 2012 05:05 in Home Theater Connection Help

AV Tip: 3 Ways to Keep Your HT System Cool

AV Tip: 3 Ways to Keep Your HT System Cool

As most people are probably aware, the lifespan of electronics can be greatly improved by keeping temperature under control. Unfortunately, many of us are content to place a receiver/amp where it is convenient as opposed to where it can receive adequate ventilation, at least until it fails. Assuming you want your receiver in a cabinet, ensure that air flow is sufficient. While many so called home theater cabinets make little or no provision for ventilation, there are some models that take this factor into account. If you already own a cabinet that lacks proper ventilation and are concerned about heat buildup, a drill can come in quite handy; an inexpensive but good quality 120mm fan set to low speed can also improve air flow without adding significantly to background noise.

Keeping you're fancy home theater gear running cool can be as simple as 1-2-3. Here are 3 easy tips to ensure cool and long lasting operation of your AV gear.

— December 14, 2012 06:05 in Home Theater Connection Help

AV Tip: Avoid Short Circuits, Save your Amplifier or AV Receiver

AV Tip: Avoid Short Circuits, Save your Amplifier or AV Receiver

A guaranteed way to make a receiver or amplifier fail is to create a short circuit by improperly connecting speaker wire to your speakers or receiver. It could be as simple as a stray strand of wire which has come loose from the binding post (on either receiver/amp or speaker) and touched the other terminal. It is critical to make sure that the bare wire of the positive speaker cable does not touch the bare wire of the negative speaker cable.

A guaranteed way to make a receiver or amplifier fail is to create a short circuit by improperly connecting speaker wire to your speakers or receiver.

— December 12, 2012 04:20 in Home Theater Connection Help

AV Tip: Power Off Equipment When Making Connections

AV Tip: Power Off Equipment When Making Connections

When making connections to receivers and amplifiers (especially when working with speaker wires), make sure that the equipment is turned off first. It's not required, but it's a lot safer for you and the equipment in the event that you accidentally touch two speaker wires together. A couple of seconds to hit the power button can save hours of shopping for new equipment.

Turn the power off on all of your equipment when connecting it up. Play it safe for yourself to avoid getting shocked and to protect your gear.

— December 08, 2012 16:30 in Home Theater Connection Help

AV Tip: Finding Online Owners Manuals

AV Tip: Finding Online Owners Manuals

Need help with setting up or configuring your new A/V receiver? A lot of manufacturers offer electronic copies of owners manuals, setup addendum's and tips on their websites to help you in case you lost yours or want to do some research. Often in PDF form, they make searching for key words easier than flipping through the manual that came with your new product. Doing a web search (such as Google) will generally find them quickly. Don't stay in the dark. Use these tools to ensure you will get the most out of your new A/V receiver.

Trying to locate the owners manual for your AV equipment? We've got you covered with a list of all of the major manufacturers and links directly to their support pages.

— December 04, 2012 06:00 in Home Theater Connection Help

Tip of the Day: Speaker Placement & Early Reflections

Tip of the Day: Speaker Placement & Early Reflections

Give your speakers plenty of space to breathe around and in front. Things like TVs, Shelves, Other Speakers, Coffee Tables and Walls create secondary sound sources that smear the presentation through early reflection and diffraction. Let the speaker be the only thing sending early cues to your ears.

Give your speakers plenty of space to breate around and in front so its the only thing sending early cues to your ears.

— November 30, 2012 16:30 in Home Theater Connection Help

Basic Home Theater AV Set Up Guide - Hooking It All Up

Basic Home Theater AV Set Up Guide - Hooking It All Up

So, you bought a home theater system? Great! Watching a movie on a properly set up surround sound system, or listening to your music through a new set of speakers can be an amazing experience. But, the key to a great home theater isn't just spending a lot of money. Setting up the system correctly is just as important as what you buy. This guide, very simply, walks through the basics of speaker placement, bass management setup, how to hook everything up, and how to change a few settings to really make your system shine. Throughout this article are links to other more advanced articles that go into more depth on each topic as well as "must see" related YouTube video discussions.

AV Set Up: So, you bought a home theater system? Watching a movie on a properly set up surround sound system can be an amazing experience. But you've got to set it all up correctly. Let us help.

— February 08, 2012 11:00 in Home Theater Connection Help

How IR Repeater Systems Work

How IR Repeater Systems Work

An IR repeater system takes Infrared (IR) light coming from your remote controller and converts it to an electrical signal that can be easily distributed over electrical wiring to one or more IR remote controllable components. How this can help improve your system and allow you more flexibility in multi-room applications is something we'll attempt to answer and explain.

An IR repeater system takes Infrared (IR) light coming from your remote controller and converts it to an electrical signal that can be easily distributed over electrical wiring to one or more IR

Thomas Steves — June 01, 2009 07:44 in Home Theater Connection Help

Connecting Your Home Office to Your Home Theater

Connecting Your Home Office to Your Home Theater

Thousands of words have been written about, and thousands of hours of labor devoted to, marrying our computers with our home theater and audio installations. On the Audioholics site alone there are 78 results from a search for "HTPC" (home theater personal computer). The problem with the concept of the HTPC is that, at its core, it’s a dedicated computer for multimedia applications. What happens if your computer is in your home office and your theater is elsewhere? What if you don’t want an HTPC? How do you combine your home office with your audio/video installation? It’s a question that’s seldom discussed in this industry.

Thousands of words have been written about, and thousands of hours of labor devoted to, marrying our computers with our home theater and audio installations. On the Audioholics site alone there are

— March 20, 2008 10:12 in Home Theater Connection Help