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Focal Aria K2 936 Floorstanding Speaker Review

by August 04, 2022
Focal Aria K2 936 Floorstanding Speakers

Focal Aria K2 936 Floorstanding Speakers

  • Product Name: Aria K2 936 floorstanding loudspeaker
  • Manufacturer: Focal
  • Performance Rating: StarStarStarStarhalf-star
  • Value Rating: StarStarStarStar
  • Review Date: August 04, 2022 01:35
  • MSRP: $ 6,600/pair
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  • Type: 3-way bass-reflex floor-standing loudspeaker
  • Speaker drivers:

3 x 61/2" (16.5cm) K2 woofer

6 1/2" (16.5cm) K2 midrange

1" (25mm) Al/Mg TNF inverted dome tweeter
  • Frequency response (+/- 3dB): 39Hz - 28kHz
  • Low frequency point - 6 dB: 32Hz
  • Sensitivity (2.83V / 1m): 92dB
  • Nominal impedance: 8 Ω
  • Minimum impedance: 2.8 Ω
  • Recommended amplifier power: 50 - 300W
  • Crossover frequency: 260Hz / 3,100Hz
  • Dimensions (H x W x D): 45 ¼”x11 9/16”x14 5/8" (1,150x294x371mm)
  • Weight: 64lbs (29kg)

Pros

  • Very good response on and off-axis
  • Wide dispersion covers a large area
  • High sensitivity and good dynamic range
  • Stylish and cool-lookin’
  • Very good build quality with nice attention to detail

Cons

  • Needs large room for best results
  • Not as much low-frequency extension as other larger tower speakers

 

Aria trim ring close up2Focal Aria K2 936 Floorstanding Speaker Introduction

Focal’s Aria loudspeaker line has been around for some years now and has received praise from reviewers and owners alike. Sadly, it wasn’t a loudspeaker series that we had close contact with in the form of a review when it was launched. However, when Focal recently revamped the Arias in the limited-edition K2 series, we decided not to miss out on another opportunity to see what Aria speakers could do and asked Focal to send us a pair. The changes that the limited-edition K2 version of the Arias makes are mostly cosmetic, but the drivers are entirely different with one of the changes being the replacement of the regular Aria’s Flax cones with Focal’s K2 Aramid Fibre Sandwich cones that look to be a bit more advanced. That brings us to the subject of today’s review, the Focal Aria K2 936. These 3-way floor-standing speakers are the big guns of the Aria K2 series and feature three 6.5” bass drivers, a 6.5” midrange driver, and an inverted dome tweeter all set inside of a hefty-sized enclosure with three ports. This model is surely the one that will most fully express what the Aria K2 series is capable of.

Appearance

In my opinion, the Aria K2 936 speakers look very nice, but they won’t be for everyone. In many instances, loudspeakers seem to draw on automobiles for styling cues, and it seems to me that these speakers do that a bit more than most. The Aria K2 936 has a gloss grey finish that Focal calls “Ash Grey.” This is a color that I am seeing becoming popular in automobiles, a grey sometimes called “gunmetal grey,” “concrete,” “stone grey,” etc. As a limited-edition model, the Aria K2 936 speakers only come in this color. The front and back baffle comes in a leatherette finish, a material that looks and feels a lot like real leather but is actually a vinyl imitation. One thing I like about this leatherette material is that it does not catch fingerprints like gloss or smooth satin finishes. The speaker is topped with a glass surface with “Focal” printed underneath the glass at the front edge.

936 grilles4  936 pair

The enclosure has a subtle curvature on the side panels that is imitated in shape by a plinth-type base. The base is made from an aluminum alloy, but it looks like iron. It is a bit more rounded and also gives the speakers a slight backward lean. It uses spiked feet that can be adjusted in height using an included tool.

focal logo  936 top reflectivity

The stand-out feature of the Aria K2 936 is the bright yellow cones. They serve as quite the contrast with the black/grey surfaces elsewhere on the speaker. With the grilles on, the Aria K2 936 is handsome with a reserved manner. The grilles have a rounded shape that continues the front baffle’s curvature. Without the grilles, the speakers do draw a bit of attention to themselves thanks to the cones, but I like the extra flash that they add. Trim rings surround the drivers and the grilles use magnetic grille guides, so the front baffle has a clean look. The yellow cones with the black dust caps remind me of older BMWs with round headlights. I would not be surprised if BMW enthusiasts were subconsciously drawn to these speakers without realizing that styling cue. With the grilles on, the Aria K2 936 speakers could fit in just about any interior decor due to the muted styling, even despite the somewhat large enclosure, but I think the ungrilled speakers will be a hit or miss for most people, and I don’t think anyone will be on the fence about that aesthetic. 

Design Analysis

The overall design of the Aria K2 936 speakers is not radically different than traditional tower speakers, and they differentiate themselves mostly in the details. The basic design is a three-way tower with three 6.5” bass drivers, a midrange, and a dome tweeter. While that is hardly a revolutionary design, it can be a very good one if executed correctly, and the proper execution lies largely in the details. Now, let’s dive into the details and start at the top with the tweeter.

936 tweeter

Focal uses their usual inverted dome shape for the tweeter. Focal claims that the inverted dome shape helps to narrow directivity versus normal convex dome tweeters. It also enables the use of a smaller diameter voice coil fixed directly to the dome, and this should make the moving assembly lighter and more rigid. The tweeter dome itself is made from an aluminum/magnesium alloy which should be stiff enough to maintain its shape up to a very high frequency but light enough to deliver good sensitivity. Focal touts the tweeter’s suspension using a material called “Poron,” an open-cell polyurethane microcellular foam that Focal says has better dimensional stability (and therefore lower distortion) and no degradation over time. The tweeter is mounted in a shallow waveguide that is intended to maximize horizontal directivity while minimizing diffraction.

936 midrange cone 

The midrange driver and bass drivers use the eponymous “K2” cone which is composed of a very light foam layer between a layer of Aramid fibers and a layer of fiberglass. This cone composition should help to tame break-up modes out to a relatively high frequency. Break-up modes are how the cone bends out of shape when it moves at frequencies that are too high for it to maintain a uniform shape. This is a serious problem in loudspeaker design because when the cone starts to deform, it can produce some very ugly sounds and ruin the fidelity of the sound. As cones become larger, the frequencies at which break-up modes occur become lower, and the Aria K2 936 has a relatively large midrange 6.5” cone along with a high crossover frequency of 3.1kHz, so it will be very important that measures are taken to keep break-up modes out of audible bands before the tweeter takes over.

936 bass cone

936 rearWith a large midrange cone, the K2 936 should have pretty good sensitivity and dynamic range in the midrange’s frequency band. Add to that the three 6.5” bass drivers, which have a combined area slightly greater than an 11” cone, and this speaker should not be lacking in dynamics, especially in such a good-sized enclosure. The enclosure itself has three ports. There are two front-firing ports and a larger-diameter down-firing one. All three ports are flared on both ends. The down-firing port has a 3 ¾” depth with a 2 ½” diameter, and the front-firing ports have a 6” depth with a 2” diameter. I would have guessed that the difference in ratio between the shape of these ports means that they will have different resonant frequencies with the down-firing port having a higher resonant frequency than the front-firing ports, but Focal says that the down-firing port actually has a lower tuning frequency than the front-firing ports.

The bass drivers are crossed over to the midrange at 260Hz, and the midrange crosses over to the tweeter at 3.1kHz, and that gives the midrange a fairly wide bandwidth, although Focal does not disclose the slopes of the filters. This keeps the phase rotation of crossover filters out of much of the vocal range, and that could help to keep a natural sound in singing and speech. Interestingly, Focal does not include the option to bi-amp or bi-wire the driver sections. As regular readers of our reviews will know, this isn’t a bad thing, because it avoids the potential mistakes that many users make when trying to take advantage of that ability. It can often cause more problems than the benefits it can bring. I like the high-torque binding posts that Focal uses. They make it very easy to get a tight fit on a bare wire connection.

936 base

The weighty aluminum base does a good job of planting the speaker to the floor, and these would not be very easy to tip over despite their height. As was mentioned before, they are slightly angled back, but the spiked feet can be adjusted by an included spanner to change the angle. That adjustability also means that they can be changed so all four feet can rest evenly on an irregular floor surface. There are rubber pads on the bottom of the base, so the base can rest on the floor without the spiked feet if the user doesn’t want to use the feet. There are also spiked feet covers in case the user wants to use the feet but wants something softer than bare metal spikes. The grille is held on by magnetic grille guides and wraps an acoustically transparent fabric over a plastic frame with a hexagonal mesh over the entire area. This grille actually would protect the speakers from a physical impact, but it probably causes some diffraction and wouldn’t do the speaker any favors as far as performance goes, but any acoustic disadvantages brought on by the grille would likely be minor.   

Listening Sessions

In my 24’ by 13’ (approximately) listening room, I set up the speakers with a few feet of stand-off distances between the back wall and sidewall and equal distance between speakers and listening position. I angled the speakers to face my listening position directly. The listening distance from the speakers was about 9 feet. No equalization was used and no subwoofers were used.

Music Listening

The Focal K2 936’s faithfully reproduced the vocalist with such enormous range and energy.

Anyone looking for an exquisite vocal recording can rely on the Korean jazz vocalist Youn Sun Nah’s albums, and that is what I did to get a sense of the Aria K2 936’s capability in this regard. Her 2010 release “Same Girl” mainly covers a diverse spread of songs from the likes of Rogers & Hammerstein, Metallica, Sergio Mendes, and Randy Newman, but she also performs a couple of her own compositions. Her covers of these other artists are anything but a simple rehash; she very much makes them her own She has the range and control over her voice to competently take her singing into any emotional territory, and her raw talent has earned her a whole slew of international awards and accolades as well as a host of albums from top European jazz labels. I streamed this finely-produced album from Qobuz at a 24-bit/88.4kHz resolution. 

The first track is a minimal cover of “My Favorite Things” that only has Sun Nah’s singing accompanied by a kalimba, and the K2 936 rendered her voice with nearly clinical precision. Her voice was anchored dead center in the soundstage, so much so that I think this track could serve as a center image check test much like a monoaural white noise. Subsequent tracks brought in a full jazz band, and through the K2 936s, I could hear that the individual instruments were largely recorded in the near field. Sun Nah’s wild singing in the track “Breakfast in Baghdad” proved to be a superlative demonstration of not just her talent but also the K2 936’s ability to failthfully reproduce a vocalist of such enormous range and energy. It’s hard to believe that the same person sings the track “Song of No Regrets,” a sorrowful tune that exudes dejection. Her masterful rendition of “Enter the Sandman” proved that she could be the next Grace Slick if she wanted. Throughout all of these tracks, the K2 936 speakers gave a revealing account of her voice but not through sibilance or any excess treble that I could discern. It was simply the aural detail that can be had from a well-crafted recording and a correctly balanced audio system. Accompanying instruments were also relayed with the same neutral, realistic presentation as Sun Nah’s voice. A gorgeous acoustic guitar on “La Chanson d’helene” was given a close examination in its solo on the K2 936 speakers, and that was very much a worthwhile exit track for this terrific album. 

 Same Girl  Richter Four Seasons

Acclaimed neoclassical composer Max Richter released a brilliant album a decade ago with his ‘recompositions’ of Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons.” These recompositions were like a remix of the famous “Four Season” that retained basic melodies or in some cases the echo of a melody from the original works but places them into new song structures. Richter has recently returned to this idea again in the 2022 release “The New Four Seasons” which applies the same ideas but takes them in different directions. While some people have complained that this is a butchery of Vivaldi’s music, the original “Four Seasons” are such a well-known and over-used staple of classic repertoire that these rearrangements are the best thing to happen to these familiar concertos in a long time. “The New Four Seasons” is meticulously produced and released by Deutsche Grammophon, and I streamed it from Qobuz in a 24-bit-96kHz resolution.  

the details of the higher pitched strings were meticulously reproduced on the K2 936s without becoming overly sharp.

On the first track, violins and violas danced on top of slow-building piano and woodwind foundation, and the contrast between these sections was beautifully articulated by the K2 936. The details of the higher-pitched strings were meticulously reproduced without becoming overly sharp. These strings do sound a bit different than traditional orchestral strings, and the reason for that is Richter opted to use period stringed instruments even though these compositions are quite modern (or at least have been modernized). The result is a more forward string section that glides over the more bass-weighted conventional orchestral sections. At times Richter also brings in a classic Moog synthesizer to add a touch of futurism to the sound pallet. Richter also clashes old with new with his prominent use of a harpsichord in some tracks, and its unique sound was reproduced with a striking lucidity on the K2 936 speakers. Through the acoustic cues heard on these speakers, the album could very clearly be heard to be performed on a soundstage rather than a symphonic hall. The performance wasn’t as spread out in sound as would be heard in a normal symphonic hall, and the performers occupied a more defined position with less reverberant ambiance than would be heard in a symphonic hall. This gave the album a sound similar to that of an orchestral score for a movie rather than attending a live performance. Perhaps that is just as well since the vast majority of orchestral music is heard as scores for film, television, and video games these days, and so neoclassical music would more properly reflect the way in which orchestral music is heard by modern listeners. This isn’t to say that is a bad thing; it is simply different, and it can still sound great, especially if heard on really good speakers like the K2 936s.

the K2 936 could stomp out the fatter basslines and beats with subwoofer-like authority.

For something on the more eccentric and wholly artificial side of music (and I do not use the word artificial in any pejorative way), I queued up an album from Death’s Dynamic Shroud entitled, “I’ll Try Living Like This.” While Death’s Dynamic Shroud is associated with the genre of Vaporwave, their music is far too inventive to be pigeonholed into any one genre. This music is like pouring pop music through a blender gone haywire, and while madness emerges from the end, there is still a method to it that makes it eminently listenable. It isn’t music for everyone, but those who can appreciate its melodic mutilation of traditional R&B and pop music may want to give it a spin on a high-fidelity system to see what it can sound like with content on the very opposite side of realism.

The soundstage, insofar as such a thing exists in music like this, is like normal studio pop music caught in a whirlwind of bizarre samples. On a pair of headphones, it sounds like listening in the eye of the storm, but the K2 936 speakers presented it in front of me, like being seated in the front row at an IMAX theater. It was still a dizzying experience but more graspable than being thrown into pop music chaos. There is some thick bass in “I’ll Try Living Like This,” and the K2 936 could stomp out the fatter basslines and beats with subwoofer-like authority. There is no doubt that these speakers had some real low-frequency muscle. Track 5 overlays a low-fi library instrumental piece with vocals taken from the mind of someone dying from an overdose of LSD, and I had to laugh at the end result when reproduced from these high-fidelity Focal loudspeakers. Every digital studio plug-in effect imaginable is deployed on this album, usually simultaneously, and on the K2 936s, it was like being a kid at a candy store. The K2 936s were able to keep the many layers of sound elements distinct, and as strange as the music could get at times, the sounds didn’t become mired in a confused mess. A lesser speaker might not have been able to differentiate the low-fi sampled elements from some of the heavily processed synth sounds. “I’ll Try Living Like This” was a lot of fun to hear on the K2 936 speakers. It shows that while hi-fi speakers can reproduce traditional acoustic recordings with realism, they can also make the stranger types of music shine thanks to the clarity, tonal balance, and dynamic range that benefits all music.

Deaths Dynamic Shroud  Hereditary OST

Keeping on the experimental side of music but from a very different angle, one album I listened to with the Aria K2 936 speakers was the original soundtrack for the movie “Hereditary.” 2018’s Hereditary was one of the most starkly horrific movies to come out in recent years, and the music played a larger part than most people realize in achieving this effect. The score was created by Colin Stetson who decided to avoid the usual tropes of the genre and didn’t use any straining strings or synthesizer drones. Instead, he relied largely on woodwinds and brass but used them in an unusual fashion to create a truly unique orchestral score. The result is unnerving and striking, and this album certainly doesn’t need the accompanying movie to create a sense of unease. Anyone looking to see how new sounds can be made from traditional instruments should give this album a listen.

the K2 936 speakers were able to provide precise imaging as well as an expansive, enveloping sound when it was called for.

The “Hereditary” score pushed woodwind instruments into their lowest octaves; in fact, the woodwinds provide much of the bass here, and the Aria K2 936 speakers were able to vividly express this unusual texture. Stetson, who is mainly known as an alto and bass saxophone player, unsurprisingly does use quite a bit of saxophone in the music, but that would come as a surprise to anyone who didn’t already know that since nothing in this music sounds anything like a normal saxophone. Much of this music is made from different types of clarinets, but again, one would never guess from just hearing the music. Stetson makes these traditional instruments sound utterly alien, and the K2 936 could evocatively communicate this effect. Some tracks are underlined by a pulsating deep bass sound, and the speakers reproduced the bass with an almost visceral potency. Some instruments held a strong center image in the soundstage while others were mixed to span outward to cover a broad swath, and the K2 936 speakers were able to provide precise imaging as well as an expansive, enveloping sound when it was called for. Much like the movie that it scores, the “Hereditary” soundtrack is not a pleasant experience but is still enjoyable due to the artistry involved. Such artistry is most fully expressed on a good sound system, and the Aria K2 936 speakers proved to be a very worthy part of such a sound system.

Movie Watching

It has been a long time since I have been as excited to watch a television show as when HBO’s “We Own This City” had been announced. One of my all-time favorite television shows was “The Wire,” and this show looked to be something of a successor to “The Wire,” since it was about Baltimore law enforcement and was made by the same creative team. As far as tests of dialogue intelligibility go, it looked to be a very good one since the showrunners insist on authentic Baltimore accents and slang, and it can sometimes be a bit tricky for a non-native to follow. And being an HBO production, the sound mix should be of the highest production quality that a television show can have. Now that all six episodes are available at the same time I had the Aria K2 936 speakers, I figured now would be a good time to binge this show. 

“We Own This City” met my high expectations of it, and the K2 936 speakers turned out to be a great choice for experiencing this show. It is crucially important that the sound system be very good in dialogue intelligibility for this show, and the K2 936s were very good indeed. Every single F-bomb was beautifully lucid, and I had no trouble understanding anything that was said. The music was largely diegetic with bar music or car stereos playing in the background with the exception of the opening titles and end credits. The sound mix was clean and down to Earth, and the effects noises were mostly just sounds from routine city life except for moments of police action such as household raids or peeling tires of patrol cars. Certainly one could get by with a lesser sound system for following this drama, but a good sound system like the Aria K2 936 speakers makes it so much more immersive. “We Own This City” turned out to be a terrific show, and anyone looking for something engrossing to binge on ought to check it out.

We Own This City  Gunpowder_Milkshake

The Focal Aria K2 936 speakers proved to be a good fit with movie action.

For a sound mix more on the fantastical side, I watched the Netflix production “Gunpowder Milkshake,” an over-the-top action movie about a ruthless lady assassin who decides to protect a child that ended up in the crosshairs of an organized crime syndicate. I had not yet seen this movie, but it looked like it has action scenes so excessive that they become comical. I had heard by word of mouth that “Gunpowder Milkshake” is heavily stylized and wildly violent, so I thought it could be a good choice for demonstrating what the Aria K2 936 speakers could do with a more traditional Hollywood fare.

One thing was clear after having seen “Gunpowder Milkshake,” and that was the Aria K2 936 speakers were not light on bass. The audio was as stylized as the video, so the action scenes had a much heavier emphasis on bass than was realistic, and this was not lost on the K2 936 speakers. Every gunshot had a meaty thump as did every punch, kick, and body slam. A car chase in an underground parking garage also evidenced the dynamic range of the speakers with a fair amount of tire squeals, revving motors, and collisions that echoed in the reverberant acoustics of the facility. In some moments, classic pop music was played over the action scenes which did mute their dynamics a bit, but it was still fun to watch the bloodbath set to some golden oldies. The original music was a traditional orchestral score that didn’t really attempt to do more than set the mood of the scenes, but it still sounded full on the K2 936s. The movie wasn’t much more than a justification for John Wick-styled violence with a feminine angle, but that was all that it promised to be, and indeed, that was what it delivered. Action movie fans should check it out if they haven’t already done so, and they should do it with speakers that won’t compress the dynamics or compromise the clarity of the sound. The Focal Aria K2 936 speakers proved to be a good fit with this movie.

About the author:

James Larson is Audioholics' primary loudspeaker and subwoofer reviewer on account of his deep knowledge of loudspeaker functioning and performance and also his overall enthusiasm toward moving the state of audio science forward.

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Recent Forum Posts:

audiogod66 posts on August 08, 2022 00:25
mtrot, post: 1567782, member: 57542
Yes, right before covid, there were nice used sets of 936 available for $2700 and I saw a set of 926 for around $1800. It's astounding how much people are asking for them now, which I refuse to pay. Just can't do it.
I can get Focal Aria 926 Gloss Black with Gia11 footers11 for $2k as of the weekend they hadn't been sold. Only trouble for anyone in Australia is the guy through the packaging away ,anyway in Sydney for those keen
mtrot posts on August 07, 2022 23:44
audiogod66, post: 1567779, member: 61876
The whole Aria speaker range basically doubled in price in the last 4 years. They were ok value 2016,2017. But these K2 936 are $8250 in Australia .The build quality for that money is dreadful. A Russian guy takes a deep dive at the 936 Aria and the speaker is junk and this shares the
same cabinet, really cheapest grade dust mdf,screws just screwed into flimsy thin mdf. Crossovers made of the cheapest crap and even using different crossover revisions in a pair ! I have taken apart Jamo 606 and the cabinet quality of Aria 936 is about the same. The Focal drivers are excellent in the K2 but the rest for this kind of money just sucks
Yes, right before covid, there were nice used sets of 936 available for $2700 and I saw a set of 926 for around $1800. It's astounding how much people are asking for them now, which I refuse to pay. Just can't do it.
audiogod66 posts on August 07, 2022 23:33
shadyJ, post: 1567286, member: 20472
57153

Focal’s Aria loudspeaker line has been around for some years now and has received praise from reviewers and owners alike. Sadly, it wasn’t a loudspeaker series that we had close contact with in the form of a review when it was launched. However, when Focal recently revamped the Arias in the limited-edition K2 series, we decided not to miss out on another opportunity to see what Aria speakers could do and asked Focal to send us a pair. Read our full review of Focal's Aria K2 936 speaker to find out what we found!

READ: FOCAL ARIA K2 936 TOWER SPEAKER REVIEW
The whole Aria speaker range basically doubled in price in the last 4 years. They were ok value 2016,2017. But these K2 936 are $8250 in Australia .The build quality for that money is dreadful. A Russian guy takes a deep dive at the 936 Aria and the speaker is junk and this shares the
same cabinet, really cheapest grade dust mdf,screws just screwed into flimsy thin mdf. Crossovers made of the cheapest crap and even using different crossover revisions in a pair ! I have taken apart Jamo 606 and the cabinet quality of Aria 936 is about the same. The Focal drivers are excellent in the K2 but the rest for this kind of money just sucks
TLS Guy posts on August 06, 2022 09:11
luis1090, post: 1567559, member: 64602
I understand what you're saying but it just doesn't make sense to spend $7k on speakers to pair with a receiver. A lot high price tag receivers have 4 ohms power ratings still I wouldn't never use one with speakers like this.

I agree, but people do. But the other issue is that most people now want to go to 20 Hz. So if people are bound and determined to roll speakers off at 60 or 80 Hz to cross to a sub, then what's the point of a low F3, might as well make the speaker more efficient, and make sure it has good power handling above 80 Hz or so. The fact is that most of the frequencies people perceive as bass are actually above sub range. In my view, a lot, and probably most speakers, are deficient in actually powerfully delivering that power range between 80 Hz and certainly 1.5KHz and even 3 to 4 KHz. The worst offenders are so often three ways, with totally inadequate mid range speakers in terms of power handling. There are actually few mids that can handle this range as single units, and most should be used in pairs.
luis1090 posts on August 06, 2022 08:51
TLS Guy, post: 1567467, member: 29650
It is that old saw, that you can have high sensitivity or extended bass, but not both. I don't think it is only the sub issue, I think it is higher spl requirements of home theater, coupled with the poor performance of power amps in receivers, which are far too prone to blow up if pushed hard, especially into lower impedance loads. Every 3db drop in speaker sensitivity doubles the power requirement of the amps. More and more speakers are in fact 4 ohm loads, no matter what the manufacturer says. That is to properly compensate for the baffle step. Most receivers are not designed for four ohm loads, and certainly not at power.
I understand what you're saying but it just doesn't make sense to spend $7k on speakers to pair with a receiver. A lot high price tag receivers have 4 ohms power ratings still I wouldn't never use one with speakers like this.
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