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AV Research

Audioholics tech articles are well researched and chock full of great detail on how products and technologies operate. Our staff of electrical and acoustical engineers, combined with industry expert guest writers ensures you're getting a true AV education when researching all topics from HDTV, cables, room acoustics, loudspeakers, amplifiers and all things related to audio and video technologies.

Introduction to Acoustics

Introduction to Acoustics

Throughout this series we hope to educate and illustrate some of the fundamental points of room acoustics. This is by no means meant to be an intensive course on acoustics, which by the way, for those that are interested, we recommend and have a list of educational and training opportunities on our website. However, this will give the reader some fundamentals and resources that may help in solving their own acoustical needs and problems. In this introductory article we would like to accomplish a few goals: First will be to discuss many of the facts and myths that exist regarding acoustics. The second will be to give a very brief definition and description of some of the acoustical terms you may have heard. Lastly, we will discuss our direction in this series of articles.

Throughout this series we hope to educate and illustrate some of the fundamental points of room acoustics. This is by no means meant to be an intensive course on acoustics, which by the way, for

rives — August 24, 2004 20:00 in Room Acoustics

Getting the Right Acoustics for Your Listening Room

Getting the Right Acoustics for Your Listening Room

"The room is the first thing we start with and the last thing we think about." This statement is so often true. It's unfortunate because the room, as we often refer to it as the "invisible component" can easily make or break the system performance. Think about it, an amplifier company makes a state of the art amplifier capable of reproducing a signal with no more than 0.01 Total Harmonic Distortion, dynamic headroom above 110 dB, and gold plated connections to insure the best possible path for the signal. Then we put this amplifier together with speakers and other fine performing electronics into a room that delivers a bass boost of 12 dB at 80 Hz, a huge dip at 300 Hz, and another strong peak around 5 kHz to 10 kHz.

"The room is the first thing we start with and the last thing we think about." This statement is so often true. It's unfortunate because the room, as we often refer to it as the "invisible component"

rives — August 24, 2004 20:00 in Room Acoustics

Rooms Without Boundaries: Using RPG Diffusors

Rooms Without Boundaries: Using RPG Diffusors

This month we have another guest writer, Jeff Madison from RPG. Jeff is the senior product application consultant in RPG's Home Theater Division. He spent his first years at RPG developing its computer modeling and acoustic testing capabilities. With a background in music and engineering, he enjoys the challenges of both large and small spaces...and golf.

This month we have another guest writer, Jeff Madison from RPG. Jeff is the senior product application consultant in RPG's Home Theater Division. He spent his first years at RPG developing its

Jeff Madison — August 24, 2004 20:00 in Room Acoustics

Room Modes and Dealing with Them

Room Modes and Dealing with Them

When the boundaries of a room accentuate bas frequencies, the listener's perception is one of a reduced midrange and soundstage. If you don't get the bass right, nothing ever comes together very well.

When the boundaries of a room accentuate bas frequencies, the listener's perception is one of a reduced midrange and soundstage. If you don't get the bass right, nothing ever comes together very

rives — August 24, 2004 19:00 in Room Acoustics

Component Video Cables - The Definitive Guide

Component Video Cables - The Definitive Guide

Component video cables are a key interconnect element to any Home Theater System. To better understand how these 75-ohm cables can affect a video signal from a DVD player, it is helpful to cover some fundamental engineering principles that define them. To begin with, the primary purpose for 75-ohm component video cables is to conduct an AC video signal from a source (DVD player) to a load (TV monitor) with as little change to that signal as possible.

Component video cables are a key interconnect element to any Home Theater System. To better understand how these 75-ohm cables can affect a video signal from a DVD player, it is helpful to cover some

— August 23, 2004 20:00 in Audio Video Cables