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Marantz SR5008, SR6008, and SR7008 Receivers Preview

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Marantz SR5008, SR6008, and SR7008 Receivers Preview

Marantz SR5008, SR6008, and SR7008 Receivers Preview

Summary

  • Product Name: SR5008, SR6008, SR7008
  • Manufacturer: Marantz
  • Review Date: June 05, 2013 14:15
  • MSRP: $899, $1199, $1999
  • First Impression: Pretty Cool

All Marantz SR Receivers include:

  • HDAM & Current Feedback Circuitry
  • Networking with AirPlay, Spotify, Pandora & SiriusXM
  • 7.2 Preamplifier Outputs and 7.1 Multi-Channel Analog Inputs
  • 4K Ultra HD Scaling and Pass-Through
  • Three Year Warranty covering parts and labor

SR5008

  • Power: 100W X7 (8 Ω/ohms, 20 Hz – 20 kHz with 0.08 % T.H.D.)
  • Dimensions (W x H x D):17.3” x 6.3” x 13.2”
  • Weight: 22 lbs 4 oz
  • Notable Features: 7.1 analog inputs, phono input, Audyssey MultEQ XT

SR6008

  • Power:110W X7 (8 Ω/ohms, 20 Hz – 20 kHz with 0.08 % T.H.D.)
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): 17.3” x 6.3” x 15.3”
  • Weight: 24 lbs 11 oz
  • Notable Features: 2nd zone, 2 HDMI ouputs, Audyssey MultEQ XT

SR7008

  • Power:125W X9 (8 Ω/ohms, 20 Hz – 20 kHz with 0.08 % T.H.D.)
  • Dimensions (W x H x D): 17.3” x 7.4 ” x 16”
  • Weight: 30 lbs
  • Notable Features: 9 ch. amplifier, 3rd zone, Audyssey MultEQ XT32 & Audyssey Sub EQ HT

Executive Overview

Every receiver manufacturer tries to carve out their own niche in the marketplace. Over the years, Marantz has made it clear they are targeting audiophiles, and so the story continues with their new lineup, the SR5008, SR6008, and SR7008. Replacing last year’s ’07 series (no, not the year 2007), the new ’08 receivers keep much of what we liked last year, but make some big changes as well. At the same time, the SR5008 and SR7008 also receive a bump in price.

Additionally, whenever Marantz or Denon release new receivers, someone is bound to claim the companies simply clone each others' designs. Up until now, we've just taken Marantz at their word that there really are internal differences between the brands. However, this year we decided to reach out to D&M (The parent company of Denon and Marantz) and ask them what the differences really are. They responded with in depth diagrams and schematics, detailing the variations between the lineups. So, before we jump into this year's new Marantz lineup, we'll look at some of the general differences between the two manufacturing heavyweights.

What Makes a Marantz Different Than a Denon?

To start with, Denon and Marantz have difference engineering teams responsible for the final "house sound" of each brand. On the outside of each receiver, we can easily see that the front panels look different, the user interface is slightly modified, and Marantz tends to have higher quality binding posts and legacy audio support. But, what about differences we can’t readily see? What can you see if you crack open receivers from both companies? Below is a brief list of some, though not all, of the key differences between the two lineups. Note that these points are specific to the 08' Marantz receivers versus the 2013 Denon X series. Also note that some of these differences only apply to certain receivers in the lineups.

  • Current feedback preamp topology – Allows for higher slew rate and lower distortion at all volume levels (particularly at low levels) than comparable voltage feedback designs
  • Decoupled capacitors - To reduce residual noise and interference
Marantz Decoupled Capacitors- Digital Board          Marantz Decoupled Capacitors - DAC

Decoupled Capacitors. Left: Around Digital Board Entrance. Right: Around DAC.

  • Luxury power capacitors – Custom capacitors, larger values for Marantz SR7008 compared to the Denon AVR-X4000
  • Hyper Dynamic Amplifier Modules (HDAM’s) – A discrete preamplifier circuit module proprietary to Marantz that goes between the volume control and power amplifier section to further improve performance

Denon AVR-X3000 Input PCB          Marantz SR6008 Input PCB - HDAM

               Denon AVR-X3000 PCB (No HDAM)     Marantz SR6008 PCB (HDAM Incorporated) 

SR5008 - $899

New to the SR5008 and SR6008 is the inclusion of Marantz’s proprietary HDAM (Hyper Dynamic Amplifier Module) and current-feedback preamp circuitry. Both features were previously only found in the SR7007 and above, but have now trickled their way down to all of the current SR receivers. Additionally, all 08' SR receivers feature full 7.2 preamp outputs and 7.1 analog inputs. Most receiver manufacturers have dropped analog multichannel inputs on sub $1K receivers, and many have also dropped analog multichannel outputs. This includes sister company Denon and their new Denon AVR-X3000 ($999). The inclusion of HDAM, current-feedback preamp circuitry, and full multichannel inputs and outputs on the SR5008 shows Marantz’s continued wooing of audiophiles.

Marantz SR5008 Receiver Front Panel       Marantz SR5008 Receiver Rear Panel

SR5008 Front Panel                      SR5008 Rear Panel   

Power stays consistent from last year at 100 watts per channel (8 Ω/ohms, 20 Hz – 20 kHz with 0.08 % T.H.D.), with discrete amplifiers and identical topology for all seven channels. The binding posts receive a refresh with more convenient spacing and color coding. The SR5008 only has 7 sets of binding posts so the surround back channels pull double duty and power zone 2 as well. Marantz actually continues using the surround back channels for zone 2 all the way up to the SR7008. This configuration makes it a pain for people who use zone 2 and 7.1, because they will either have to switch out speaker cables or use an external amp for zone 2. I would rather that Marantz follow Yamaha’s lead and use the front height/width channels (available on the SR6008 and SR7008) for zone 2.

Audyssey MultEQ XT, 4K & 3D pass-through, AirPlay, Pandora, Spotify, RS232, 12v trigger output & IR in (no IR out) also make their way over from the SR5007. There’s a bump to 7 HDMI inputs, otherwise all inputs remain the same. We don’t see anything too huge to compel people to upgrade from the SR5007 to the SR5008, but we do like the changes that have been made. The multichannel inputs, pre-outs, HDAM, and current-feedback preamp circuitry set the SR5008 apart from most of the competition. The inclusion of a phono input would have rounded out the SR5008 perfectly, but for that, you'll have to jump up to the SR6008.

SR6008 - $1199

An extra $300 dollars steps you up to the SR6008, and all the upgrades that go with it. For starters, a increase to 110wpc and two additional binding posts. It still has 7 amplifiers and 7.2 preouts, but an extra set of binding posts for Audyssey DSX and DTS Neo:X front height or front width channels. The 9 sets of binding posts allow users to easily switch between a traditional 7.1 system (with surround back channels) to a 5.1 + height or width setup.

Marantz SR6008 Receiver Front Panel        Marantz SR6008 Receiver Rear Panel

SR6008 Front Panel                      SR6008 Rear Panel

The SR6008, compared to the SR5008, also adds a phono input, extra composite input (4 total), and instapreview for convenient HDMI switching. It still keeps Audyssey MultEQ XT, but it’s now Audyssey Installer Pro Ready. The last big upgrades over the SR5008 are digital audio support for zone 2 and a second fully discrete HDMI output. While I can see the SR5008 as a compelling product in its price class, the SR6008 generally seems a little less enticing. Denon’s AVR-X4000 we reviewed retails for $100 more and offers a lot of features that the SR6008 lacks. The AVR-X4000 supports processing for a 9.2 system (still only 7 internal amps), 3 zones of audio, 3 HDMI outputs (2 discrete), an extra set of binding posts, and Audyssey MultEQ XT32 & SubEQ HT. To top it off, the AVR-X4000 also boasts 125wpc compared to the SR6008’s 110wpc. But, the Denon doesn't have multichannel analog pre-ins. It also lacks many of the higher grade internal components that the SR6008 has.

SR7008 - $1999

We finally arrive at the top of Marantz’s 2013 SR lineup, the SR7008 for $1999. The SR7008 is a $200 price increase over the SR7007, but there’s good reason for the extra cash, and good reason to upgrade. It’s now a full-fledged 9.2 receiver, with 9 fully discrete 125 watt internal amplifiers and 11 sets of binding posts. The 11 sets of binding posts are accompanied by 11.2 preouts, but unfortunately the SR7008 only has the processing power to support a 9.2 system. A 3rd HDMI output finally appears (2 discrete, 1 clone) and a 3rd zone of audio as well. Even more important is the upgrade to Audyssey MultEQ XT32 & Audyssey SubEQ HT.

Marantz SR7008 Receiver Front Panel            Marantz SR7008 Receiver Rear Panel

SR7008 Front Panel                      SR7008 Rear Panel

The SR7008 sits at an interesting spot compared to the AVR-X4000 for $700 less. Both receivers have a nearly identical feature set, but the SR7008 has full multichannel inputs, 9 internal amplifiers, and higher grade components. The power capacitors are also larger in the SR7008, 15,000uF compared to 12,000uF. Granted, the larger caps are for supporting the extra two channels of amplification, not for providing more power per channel. One final note is that Marantz is going to continue producing last year's SR7007 to help fill the large gap between the SR6008 and SR7008.

Marantz '08 SR Receivers Conclusion

Marantz's new 2013 receiver lineup stays true to the company's long lineage of audiophile products. Many other AV companies tend to focus on offering as many features as possible, at as low of price as possible, usually at the expense of build quality (checkout our article on Trading Amplifier Quality for Features). Marantz has resisted that urge, and has chosen to focus on high quality internal components in pursuit of the best sound quality possible. This also means that you might have to pay more for a Marantz to get the feature set you want. So, is one of the new 08' SR receivers right for you? Well, that depends on what type of consumer you are. But, we're confident that between Marantz's and Denon's offerings, there's sure to be a receiver for most anyone.

About the author:

Cliff, like many of us, has always loved home theater equipment. In high school he landed a job at Best Buy that started his path towards actual high quality audio. His first surround sound was a Klipsch 5.1 system. After that he was hooked, moving from Klipsch to Polk to Definitive Technology, and so on. Eventually, Cliff ended up doing custom installation work for Best Buy and then for a "Ma & Pa" shop in Mankato, MN.

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Recent Forum Posts:

Lulimet posts on February 25, 2014 23:30
slipperybidness, post: 1019171
A possible exception might be running Zone 2 for outside/patio.
It's exactly what I use zone 2 for, pair of speakers on a deck. Music stored on a NAS and control everything from my phone with the Marantz App. It's awesome.
slipperybidness posts on February 24, 2014 10:07
rojo, post: 1019093
I just recently bought the Marantz SR6008. I bought Marantz for the reputed warmth and clarity. I was not disappointed. I got the 6008 because it was the lowest common denominator providing a 2nd HDMI out for my evil purposes.

I considered a 6007 for a while. Then I saw the spec sheets for both. (SR6007, SR6008) Looking at the 6-ohm distortion rating for each, it's clear that some sort of advanced sorcery has been employed in the 08. Considering that 8 ohm speakers aren't consistently 8 ohms from min to max frequency, I figured I'd get the best sound from the current model. That, and I've also got my eye on a pair of 6-ohm mains.

Regarding all the Zone 2 / Zone 3 garbage, I'm completely befuddled by this. I don't get why multi-zone capability is such a popular feature in receivers, or why it should be a deal breaker if a Yamaha's zone 2 uses the front height channels rather than the rear surround. I mean, after you have gone to the trouble of running wires from room to room, setting up an RF extender / IR blaster, and so on, only to end up with 2.1 sound in the second room, wouldn't it have been easier (and perhaps even cheaper) just to buy a dedicated system for the 2nd room? I mean, if your source is Blu-Ray or similar, it seems awfully inefficient to go to a different room to insert a disc. If you're streaming FLAC files from a media server, ethernet or wifi ought to be just as effective and much less complicated. If you're piping music outside to a hot tub, then what's the benefit of making your home theater receiver pull double duty rather than using a second amp or a second receiver? What sort of first world problem is Zone 2 solving?

Then again, I intentionally try to limit my AV technology to one room of the house. I don't even have a television in my bedroom, and I prefer it that way. I used to be such a technophile. Have I become that old guy, the 12 o'clock flasher? (You know, where every clock in the house flashes 12:00.)

I'm with you on the Zone 2 stuff. It just seems like more trouble than it's worth to me. I prefer a system for each room where it is needed.

A possible exception might be running Zone 2 for outside/patio.
rojo posts on February 23, 2014 21:46
I just recently bought the Marantz SR6008. I bought Marantz for the reputed warmth and clarity. I was not disappointed. I got the 6008 because it was the lowest common denominator providing a 2nd HDMI out for my evil purposes.

I considered a 6007 for a while. Then I saw the spec sheets for both. (SR6007, SR6008) Looking at the 6-ohm distortion rating for each, it's clear that some sort of advanced sorcery has been employed in the 08. Considering that 8 ohm speakers aren't consistently 8 ohms from min to max frequency, I figured I'd get the best sound from the current model. That, and I've also got my eye on a pair of 6-ohm mains.

Regarding all the Zone 2 / Zone 3 garbage, I'm completely befuddled by this. I don't get why multi-zone capability is such a popular feature in receivers, or why it should be a deal breaker if a Yamaha's zone 2 uses the front height channels rather than the rear surround. I mean, after you have gone to the trouble of running wires from room to room, setting up an RF extender / IR blaster, and so on, only to end up with 2.1 sound in the second room, wouldn't it have been easier (and perhaps even cheaper) just to buy a dedicated system for the 2nd room? I mean, if your source is Blu-Ray or similar, it seems awfully inefficient to go to a different room to insert a disc. If you're streaming FLAC files from a media server, ethernet or wifi ought to be just as effective and much less complicated. If you're piping music outside to a hot tub, then what's the benefit of making your home theater receiver pull double duty rather than using a second amp or a second receiver? What sort of first world problem is Zone 2 solving?

Then again, I intentionally try to limit my AV technology to one room of the house. I don't even have a television in my bedroom, and I prefer it that way. I used to be such a technophile. Have I become that old guy, the 12 o'clock flasher? (You know, where every clock in the house flashes 12:00.)
Maxi posts on August 03, 2013 22:16
Actually the difference in sound between 6007 and 3313 is very audible. Especially noticeable in detail sound.
But 6006 and 3313 are very similar in sound.

Guys, I recently fortunate enough to hear 7008 with good acoustics in stereo, it's amazing, I had never heard anything like it.
boydzfv posts on July 24, 2013 03:38
i would have bought a marantz instead of my denon just for the looks if they had offered the same features at anywhere close to the same price.




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