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Status Acoustics Titus 8T Floorstanding Speaker System Conclusion

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Status_side.jpgSpending the last three months with the Status Titus 8T speaker system has been a true audiophile revelation for me.  This speaker has transformed the way I listen to music as I seem to now place more emphasis on two-channel over multi-channel listening these days.  Even after all this time listening, the honeymoon phase has still yet to wear off.  I am still in awe each time I engage in a listening session, denying that the fidelity could be as good as I remembered the day before.   There are times that I like to just sit and stare at the beauty of this design because it’s truly a unique-looking loudspeaker.  In fact, the Status 8T system is quite a conversation piece as they make their presence known to anyone who comes into my theater room for a visit.  People are instantly drawn to these speakers, like Pavlov’s dog to a steak, wanting me to fire them up for a listen.  They sound great just looking at them!

The Status 8T system is what I consider to be "speakers for life"...

The Status 8T system has an uncanny ability of sounding larger than life yet focused like a laser.  Their sound transcends their physical cabinets, which is grandiose and in your face when called to do so, yet delicate like the petals of a rose beckoning you to carefully listen, rewarding you with pure unadulterated audio perfection.  The 8T speaker system has a fundamental rightness to its sound that just hooks you into spending more time listening.  In fact, the biggest issue I’ve found with these speakers is once you engage in a listening session either solo or with friends, time seems to speed up.  Einstein would be puzzled by the reverse time-dilation paradox these speakers often create with unwary listeners.  I’ve noticed my wife and I have been plowing through bottles of wine with greater frequently since I’ve gotten these in for review.

If you’re in the market to assemble a cost-no-object audiophile two-channel or multi-channel system, I can’t imagine anyone not being completely satisfied with the new Status Acoustics Titus 8T speaker system.  These are truly what I consider to be “speakers for life” in that once you own a set, there’s pretty much no need to upgrade in the future.… unless, of course, the folks at Status Acoustics come up with something even more impressive.  Highly recommended if you’ve got the coin and space!

Many thanks to Steve Feinstein for his technical contributions and peer review

Status Acoustics Titus 8T Floorstanding Speaker System
MSRP: $50k/pair

Status Acoustics
Mailing Address:

382 Marshall Way
Layton, Utah USA 84041-7318

Phone and Fax:
Toll-free: (800) 543-2205
Phone: (801) 543-2200
Fax: (801) 543-3300

Email Address:
[email protected]

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Audioholics.com note: The ratings indicated below are based on subjective listening and objective testing of the product in question. The rating scale is based on performance/value ratio. If you notice better performing products in future reviews that have lower numbers in certain areas, be aware that the value factor is most likely the culprit. Other Audioholics reviewers may rate products solely based on performance, and each reviewer has his/her own system for ratings.

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Treble ExtensionStarStarStarStarStar
Treble SmoothnessStarStarStarStarStar
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Gene manages this organization, establishes relations with manufacturers and keeps Audioholics a well oiled machine. His goal is to educate about home theater and develop more standards in the industry to eliminate consumer confusion clouded by industry snake oil.

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Recent Forum Posts:

haraldo posts on October 13, 2013 16:52
Rich Davis, post: 993231
I laughed for about 5 minutes after seeing that photograph. does the mfg of the test equipment instruct the user to move the speakers outdoors when performing those measurements? That's not a good methodology for testing a speaker, plus I would use the cables that the MFG recommends for their speakers when connecting to other components such as amps and pre amps. The reason is the mfg uses equipment/cables in their listening rooms when designing and testing their equipment, so they might have recommendations for obtaining similar test results.

It is insulting to my intelligence that a reviewer would take home audio speakers and move them outside to perform measurement tests. Every time I've been to an outdoor concert, wind has a HUGE factor on various frequencies, so I'm sure testing home audio systems outdoors is, well, kind of stupid, IMO. Aren't you supposed to use an anechoic chamber for those kinds of measurement tests instead?

The best way to measure speakers is probably in an anechoic chamber but the cost is prohibitive as in order to get good results way down in frequencies size of wedges and size of room must be enormous, I don't even comprehend what the cost is but it's probably way out of reach. lacking anechoic chamber, the outdoor testing is the only way to reliably measure a speaker I reckon, unless you want to measure the room modes and other influences of the room.

I guess Vandersteen Audio has facilities like this and for sure also Dunlavy Audio Labs used this as John Dunlavy could measure his speakers reliably in an anechoic chamber down below 20Hz…. I really don't see why Audhioholics should go the the step of putting so much money into this…. I believe what they do is industry leading and way better measurements than say… what they do in Stereophile, which is indoors at 50", many speakers don't integrate properly at such a short distance…. if Stereophile measures at bigger distance then room influence would take over…. There's been a wave of criticism from some manufacturers about this way of measuring, claiming that it just doesn't show reliably performance of some large array speakers…… I am not saying that it's this way or the other but just referring to what's been written and stated around Inet…

I reckon outdoors is way way better, Audioholics is the benchmark
gene posts on October 13, 2013 16:00
Rich Davis, post: 993231
I laughed for about 5 minutes after seeing that photograph. does the mfg of the test equipment instruct the user to move the speakers outdoors when performing those measurements? That's not a good methodology for testing a speaker, plus I would use the cables that the MFG recommends for their speakers when connecting to other components such as amps and pre amps. The reason is the mfg uses equipment/cables in their listening rooms when designing and testing their equipment, so they might have recommendations for obtaining similar test results.

It is insulting to my intelligence that a reviewer would take home audio speakers and move them outside to perform measurement tests. Every time I've been to an outdoor concert, wind has a HUGE factor on various frequencies, so I'm sure testing home audio systems outdoors is, well, kind of stupid, IMO. Aren't you supposed to use an anechoic chamber for those kinds of measurement tests instead?

I'll give you the benefit of a doubt seeing how you're a new member and obviously lacking in knowledge on measuring loudspeakers.

This speaker was measured both outdoors (for accuracy) and indoors (to see how they integrated into the room). The outdoor measurements most closely approximate an anechoic environment by removing all echos but the floor. A speaker this large would be difficult to measure anechoically even if we had access to a chamber due to its sheer size and capabilities down below 100Hz.

Outdoor measurements (aka, GP) are the best way to measure subwoofers which is not only an industry standard but it's also what we do. It has the advantage over anechoic since most anechoic chambers are too small and/or have insufficiently sized wedges to produce accurate results below 100Hz.

Hopefully you will will read up more on the subject matter before making such insulting and ignorant postings in the future.
fuzz092888 posts on October 13, 2013 15:12
Rich Davis, post: 993231
I laughed for about 5 minutes after seeing that photograph. does the mfg of the test equipment instruct the user to move the speakers outdoors when performing those measurements? That's not a good methodology for testing a speaker, plus I would use the cables that the MFG recommends for their speakers when connecting to other components such as amps and pre amps. The reason is the mfg uses equipment/cables in their listening rooms when designing and testing their equipment, so they might have recommendations for obtaining similar test results.

It is insulting to my intelligence that a reviewer would take home audio speakers and move them outside to perform measurement tests. Every time I've been to an outdoor concert, wind has a HUGE factor on various frequencies, so I'm sure testing home audio systems outdoors is, well, kind of stupid, IMO. Aren't you supposed to use an anechoic chamber for those kinds of measurement tests instead?

Outdoor testing is a perfectly viable way of gaining near anechoic measurements so long as you account for outdoor factors and don't test where it's noisy or on a windy day, gate your measurements appropriately, etc. If you don't know how to properly test speakers (based on your last sentence) then how can you criticize others on how it's being done? Besides, comparing being at an outdoor concert to what is being referenced is just silly. If you can't see why, then I'm not sure what to say.

As long as the cables aren't defective and are competently made they should perform near identically to higher priced cables. Although if you're buying these speakers I doubt you have any issue paying for Kimber Kable or the like.
Rich Davis posts on October 13, 2013 14:46
Why is there a test performed outdoors?

I laughed for about 5 minutes after seeing that photograph. does the mfg of the test equipment instruct the user to move the speakers outdoors when performing those measurements? That's not a good methodology for testing a speaker, plus I would use the cables that the MFG recommends for their speakers when connecting to other components such as amps and pre amps. The reason is the mfg uses equipment/cables in their listening rooms when designing and testing their equipment, so they might have recommendations for obtaining similar test results.

It is insulting to my intelligence that a reviewer would take home audio speakers and move them outside to perform measurement tests. Every time I've been to an outdoor concert, wind has a HUGE factor on various frequencies, so I'm sure testing home audio systems outdoors is, well, kind of stupid, IMO. Aren't you supposed to use an anechoic chamber for those kinds of measurement tests instead?
BoredSysAdmin posts on August 30, 2013 10:57
Weird, I clearly remember posting one of the first posts on this thread something like this: “Too bad Kimber cable interconnects weren't mentioned at all in the article” clearly referring to reoccurrence of Kimber brand 6 times on a single page.

Now I can't find that post anymore. hmmmm……
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