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OPPO BDP-95 Blu-ray Player First Look

By
OPPO BDP-95

OPPO BDP-95

Summary

  • Product Name: BDP-95 3D Blu-ray Player
  • Manufacturer: OPPO Digital
  • Review Date: December 22, 2010 05:30
  • MSRP: $999
  • First Impression: Gotta Have It!
  • Buy Now

Disc Types

BD-Video, Blu-ray 3D, DVD-Video, DVD-Audio, AVCHD, SACD, CD, HDCD, Kodak Picture CD, CD-R/RW, DVD±R/RW, DVD±R DL, BD-R/RE

BD Profile

BD-ROM Version 2.4 Profile 5 for 3D (also compatible with Profile 2, Profile 1 Version 1.0 and 1.1)

Internal Storage

2GB (Approximately 1GB available for BD-Live persistent storage. Actual storage varies due to system usage)

Output

Multi-Channel Analog Audio: 7.1ch, 5.1ch, or stereo

Dedicated Stereo Analog Audio: XLR balanced and RCA single-ended

Digital Audio: Coaxial, Optical

HDMI Audio: Stereo, up to 7.1ch high-resolution PCM, up to 5.1ch DSD, bitstream or LPCM conversion of Dolby Digital, Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby TrueHD, DTS, DTS-HD High Resolution Audio, and DTS-HD Master Audio.

Analog Video: Composite, Component Video (Y/Pb/Pr, 480i/480p, 720p/1080i available for non-restricted content only)

Digital Video: HDMI with HDCP (NTSC: 480i/480p/720p/1080i/1080p/1080p24, PAL 576i/576p/720p/1080i/1080p/1080p24)

Video Characteristics

Composite Video Amplitude: 1.0Vp-p (75Ω)

Component Video: Y: 1.0Vp-p (75Ω), Pb/Pr: 0.7Vp-p (75Ω)

Audio Characteristics

Frequency: 20Hz - 20kHz (±0.2dB), 20Hz - 96kHz (±1dB)

Signal-to-Noise Ratio: >125dB (A-weighted, with auto-mute), >115dB (A-weighted, without auto-mute)

THD+N: <0.0003% or -110dB (1kHz 192/24 at 0dBFS, 20kHz LPF), <0.002% or -95dB (1kHz 44.1/16 at 0dBFS, 20kHz LPF)

Output Level: 2Vrms at 0dBFS (RCA), 4Vrms at 0dBFS (XLR)

General Specification

Power Supply: ~ 100V - 120V or 200V - 240V, 50/60Hz AC

Power Consumption: 45W (0.5W Standby)

Dimensions: 430mm x 311mm x 98mm, 16-7/8 x 12-1/4 x 4 inches

Mass: 7.3kg / 16 lbs

Executive Overview

Boy, if felt like it was only yesterday we were gushing all over the the Oppo BDP-83 Blu-ray player - the player good enough to repackage and sell at a $3000 premium. When Oppo announced the release of their BDP-93 3D Blu-ray Player, we knew the spiritual successor to the audiophile grade BDP-83SE couldn't be far behind.

We were right.

Let us start off by saying we love this new business model of Oppo. We love that they release a "bare-bones" model often has more features than anything on the market in the price point. We love that they now start offering an audiophile version with upgraded audio section for those that have the money, desire, and gear to appreciate it. This is a best of both worlds situation. Joe Consumer gets a full featured Blu-ray player with state of the art technology at a very reasonable price. Users that have spent more money on their speakers than many spend on food in a year get to pay a premium for a player that adds those extra bells and whistles that true audiophiles demand without sacrificing any of the other features.

First, we should talk about price. Formally the price has not yet been set up inside sources at Oppo have confirmed that it will come in under a grand - but maybe not much. This is a bit more than the Oppo BDP-83SE which commanded $899. While owners of the BDP-83 could pay to have their players upgraded to the SE model, that isn't possible with the BDP-95 (hence the change in model number). A look at the back of both models will confirm that the 95 is not just a modified 93, it is a completely new product.

BDP-93-back
Oppo BDP-93

 BDP-95-back
Oppo BDP-95

Just glancing at the rear panel of the BDP-95 reveals a number of serious upgrades. First, you find XLR as well as RCA stereo outputs. With the BDP-93 you'd be forced to use the Left and Right channels of the 7.1 analogue outputs. The rest of the connections are all the same if a bit rearranged. Observant readers will note that the 95 is a bit taller than the 93 (the 93 is 16.9 x 12.25 x 3.125 inches and the 95 is same except 4 inches tall). There is also a fan on the back of the 95 that is not present on the 93. This is probably because of the internal upgrades which includes a toroidal transformer built by Rotel.

Yes, that Rotel.

The toroidal power transformer is designed to offer superior inrush current and much lower exterior magnetic field over traditional laminated steel core transformers. The BDP-95's toroidal linear power supply provides a very clean and robust power source to the critical audio components. But the most important part as far as audio is the DAC - Digital to Analogue Converter. In the case of the BDP-95, they've opted with the SABRE32 (that 32 is supposed to be superscript) Reference ES9018 from ESS Technology. This is the same DAC they used in high-end consumer applications and professional studio equipment. The SABRE brags a DNR (Dynamic Range) of up to 135dB and a THD+N (Total Harmonic Distortion plus Noise) of -120dB. This is the industry's highest performance level and should satisfy even the most demanding audio purist (of course, we fully expect to see a BDP-95 with a tube sticking out of the top at the next high-end show because, you know, everything sounds better with tubes). Oppo hasn't just used a single SABRE DAC for their BDP-95, they use two - one for the 7.1 channel output and a second one for the dedicated stereo output. All this technology adds nearly 50% additional weight to the unit bringing the BDP-95 in at 16 pounds.

The BDP-95 is scheduled to start shipping in February. You can register on Oppo's website to be notified by email when it comes available.

Conclusion

The BDP-95 still has all the other features of the BDP-93 including dual HDMI outputs, Marvell's Kyoto-G2 video processor, Netflix and Blockbuster support, and 3D compatibility. Hopefully they'll also add more features like VUDU and other streaming services shortly after release. And this is what is so great about the new BDP-95: You don't have sacrifice the latest and greatest features to have state of the art audio. If all you really want is a great player with universal disc support (meaning it plays DVDs, CDs, Blu-rays, DVD-As, and SACDs plus lots more), 3D, and Netflix, the BDP-93 is a great choice. But if you are really worried about audio, specifically two channel analogue audio, it's going to be really hard to outperform the BDP-95. Considering the price (under a grand), it is probably impossible to beat. If you have high end processors, amps, and speakers, you owe it to your gear to feed them a source as quality as the BDP-95... or wait until someone takes it and puts it into a nicer box for you to buy at 7x the price.

For more information, please visit www.oppodigital.com.

Unless otherwise indicated, this is a preview article for the featured product. A formal review may or may not follow in the future.

About the author:
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As Associate Editor at Audioholics, Tom promises to the best of his ability to give each review the same amount of attention, consideration, and thoughtfulness as possible and keep his writings free from undue bias and preconceptions. Any indication, either internally or from another, that bias has entered into his review will be immediately investigated. Substantiation of mistakes or bias will be immediately corrected regardless of personal stake, feelings, or ego.

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Recent Forum Posts:

PearlcorderS701 posts on April 19, 2011 22:36
PENG, post: 807087
You can see such user reviews by visiting avsforum and I have read more than one HT magazine reviews that offer some sort of comparisons as well. From what I can remember, they said the 83, 93, 95 are basically equal in PQ and the 83 SE and 95 are better in SQ. Between the SE and the 95 I don't think anyone said anything about which one was better in SQ.

Hello Again PENG,

Oh, so okay – you got your answer then regarding the PQ between these decks…didn't you? They're basically the same, picture quality wise, between the 83, 93 and 95? Isn't that what you and I were discussing earlier in this thread? And is that PQ with regard to DVD or Blu-ray quality?
PENG posts on April 19, 2011 19:08
Techlord, post: 806968
I'm sure at some point someone could do a comparison between the 83SE and the BDP-95 and even the BDP-93, while I'm not interested in 3D whatsoever its hard to imagine being able to see a dramatic difference in video quality of the VRS 2010 chip vs the new kid on the block. The only thing I upgrade every two years is my computer, you know who you are. Anyhow it will be interesting to see the differences between (excluding the XLR outputs) the 83SE and the new kid in town!

-Techlord

You can see such user reviews by visiting avsforum and I have read more than one HT magazine reviews that offer some sort of comparisons as well. From what I can remember, they said the 83, 93, 95 are basically equal in PQ and the 83 SE and 95 are better in SQ. Between the SE and the 95 I don't think anyone said anything about which one was better in SQ.
Techlord posts on April 19, 2011 01:01
I'm sure at some point someone could do a comparison between the 83SE and the BDP-95 and even the BDP-93, while I'm not interested in 3D whatsoever its hard to imagine being able to see a dramatic difference in video quality of the VRS 2010 chip vs the new kid on the block. The only thing I upgrade every two years is my computer, you know who you are. Anyhow it will be interesting to see the differences between (excluding the XLR outputs) the 83SE and the new kid in town!

-Techlord
Ron Temple posts on April 12, 2011 12:32
goodman, post: 805946
UPS delivered my BDP-95 on Friday. It is heavy. I installed it, played with it, and eventually removed my Sony DVD/SACD player and my PS3 from the system. I wired it with 5.1 analog outs and stereo analog outs. I also installed a coax audio cable and an optical audio cable, thinking I could send digital audio to my receiver for standard Dolby Digital and DTS. So far, this doesn't seem to work - all formats seem to emanate from the BDP-95 through the analog outs. The picture and sound, while very good, are not noticeably superior, except for DTS HD MA and Dolby True Surround, which are superior. The question is: am I getting DTS HD MA and Dolby True HD through the analog outs or merely uncompressed audio? Even if it is only uncompressed audio, it sounds much better than squawky DD and DTS. How much better would the uncompressed audio be if I spring for an HDMI-equipped receiver?
My understanding is that the player converts the codecs and sends it as PCM to your receiver, but your are getting the entire package. As far as HDMI bitstream being better…that will depend on the DACs in the AVR or pre plus any automatic eq added.

In my case, I was using a legacy pre/pro with my 83SE. The player always displayed which codec version was on the disk and sent it along PCM. When I moved over to an Onk 1007 via HDMI w/Audyssey the differences are subtle, but I have no real preference. I do prefer the Oppo DACs for 2 channel and MCH so I'm connected both ways. However, I haven't found a way to force the signal to either analog or HDMI. If it's a DTS MA or DDTHD, then it goes via HDMI. DVDA and SACD go analog and the AVR display shows MUltichannel. If a BD only offers uncompressed PCM, then it goes analog.
goodman posts on April 12, 2011 11:47
UPS delivered my BDP-95 on Friday. It is heavy. I installed it, played with it, and eventually removed my Sony DVD/SACD player and my PS3 from the system. I wired it with 5.1 analog outs and stereo analog outs. I also installed a coax audio cable and an optical audio cable, thinking I could send digital audio to my receiver for standard Dolby Digital and DTS. So far, this doesn't seem to work - all formats seem to emanate from the BDP-95 through the analog outs. The picture and sound, while very good, are not noticeably superior, except for DTS HD MA and Dolby True Surround, which are superior. The question is: am I getting DTS HD MA and Dolby True HD through the analog outs or merely uncompressed audio? Even if it is only uncompressed audio, it sounds much better than squawky DD and DTS. How much better would the uncompressed audio be if I spring for an HDMI-equipped receiver?
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