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Outlaw Audio RR2150 Measurements & Analysis

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All measurements were conducted using our Audio Precision APx585 8 Channel HDMI Audio Analyzer following our rigid Amplifier Measurement Test Protocol.

Signal to Noise Ratio

RR2150-SNR-1watt

Outlaw RR2150 SNR @ 1 watt (A-weighted)

The RR2150 exhibited a low noise floor.  At 1 watt I measured 83dB (A-weighted) and 76dB with no filter engaged.  The relatively small difference between A-wt and un-weighed measurements indicates that out of band residual noise residuals are low.  At rated power, I measured 103dB (A-wt).

Frequency Response

RR2150-freq-bw

Outlaw RR2150 Frequency Response @ 1 watt

The RR2150 exhibited ruler flat frequency response at all power levels within the audio band.  I measured a -3dB point of 60kHz from the speaker outputs. 

Power Measurements

Using our Audio Precision APx585 8-channel HDMI analyzer, I conducted a full barrage of multi-channel amplifier tests on the RR2150. We tested power using three methods all of which were taken at < 0.1% THD + N:

  • Continuous Full Power Bandwidth (CFP-BW) from 20Hz to 20Khz into 8 and 4-ohm loads (up to two-channels)
  • 1kHz Power Sweep vs Distortion (1kHz PSweep) - popularized by the print magazines, this is an instantaneous power vs distortion test at 1kHz. The problem with this test is it often masks slew related and or frequency response problems some amplifiers exhibit at the frequency extremes, and thus inflates the measured power results. It does provide an instant gratification # for consumers to argue over on the forums so we are now incorporating this test to please the masses.
  • Dynamic PWR - 1kHz CEA-2006 Burst Method testing. This is a dynamic power measurement adopted from the car industry similar to IHF method only a bit more difficult for an amplifier and more representative of real musical content.

Keep in mind most review publications don't do continuous power measurements and they usually publish power measurements into clipping at 1% THD + N. Our measurements are very conservative as we use a dedicated 20A line with no Variac to regulate line voltage.  We constantly monitor the line to ensure it never drops more than 2Vrms from nominal which in our case was 120Vrms. 

For more info on amplifier measurements, see:  The All Channels Driven (ACD) Test

RR2150-freq-pwr 

Outlaw RR2150 Frequency Response @ Full Rated Power (100wpc x 2, 8 ohms)

RR2150-psweep-8ohm

RR2150-psweep-4ohm

Outlaw RR2150 1kHz Power Test

Top Pic: 2CH driven, 8 ohms;  Bottom Pic: 2CH driven, 4 ohms

RR2150 CEA 2006 Burst (8 ohm)  

Outlaw RR2150 Dynamic Power Test (1kHz) 2CH Driven, 8 ohms

# of CH Test Type Power Load THD + N
2 CFP-BW 110 watts 8 ohms 0.1%
2 CFP-BW 165 watts 4 ohms 0.1%
1 1kHz Psweep 143 watts 8 ohms 0.1%
1 1kHz Psweep 148 watts 8 ohms 1%
2 1kHz Psweep 120 watts 8 ohms 0.1%
2 1kHz Psweep 126 watts 8 ohms 1%
2 1kHz Psweep 175 watts 4 ohms 0.1%
2 1kHz Psweep 180 watts 4 ohms 1%
1 Dynamic PWR 168 watts 8 ohms 1%
2 Dynamic PWR 155 watts 8 ohms 1%
1 Dynamic PWR 298 watts 4 ohms 1%
2 Dynamic PWR 270 watts 4 ohms 1%

Outlaw RR2150 Power Measurement Table

Outlaw rates the RR2150 as follows:

  • 100 watts x 2 continuous @ 8-ohm  from 20Hz to 20kHz < 0.03% THD + N
  • 160 watts x 2 continuous @ 4-ohm from 20Hz to 20kHz < 0.03% THD +N

Most amplifier companies never give such detailed continuous full bandwidth power ratings like this, let alone receiver companies.  This type of honesty is refreshing.

The RR2150 not only met the specified manufacturer power figures, it beat them.  For continuous power, I measured 110wpc x 2, 8 ohms and 165 wpc x 2, 4 ohms at below 0.1% THD+N.  Using the typical 1kHz Psweep tests, you can see the RR2150 produced above its continuous ratings for 8 ohm and 4 ohm loads, both channels driven.  Dynamic power was an impressive 168 watts into 8 ohms and almost 300 watts into 4 ohms with one channel driven.  I did measure one channel to be slightly more powerful than the other by a few watts, so my figures always reflect the lower power ratings. 

That being said, the RR2150 exhibited 2.3dB of dynamic headroom based on the comparison of the continuous power ratings to what I measured dynamically.  It’s clear that the power supply in this amp section, coupled with high current output devices provides plenty of real world power to drive a wide variety of speakers, even those rated down to 4 ohms.  Not once in any of my power torture tests was I able to cause the power protection circuits to kick in.  This is one ballsy amp section for a receiver!

Distortion Analysis

FFT Distortion

 RR2150 FFT Distortion Analysis @ 1 watt

Outlaw RR2150 FFT Distortion Analysis @ 1 watt

I ran FFT distortion plots at 1 watt and full rated power to determine how clean this amplifier really is.  At 1 watt, the spectral distortion pretty clean with the 2nd order harmonic down 90dB from the fundamental.  At rated power, things got a bit less sterile as expected with the 3rd order products dominating but still -85dB below the fundamental. 

Intermodulation Distortion

We just started including SMPTE IMD distortion tests to see how amplifiers react to non-harmonically related signals.  The test signal consists of a 60Hz and 7kHz test signal summed together at a 4:1 amplitude ratio.

RR2150-SMPTE-25watt 

Outlaw RR2150 SMPTE IMD Distortion Test

This test was conducted at 25 watts with both channels driven.  The RR2150 exhibited good results in this test.  No residuals were present for 60Hz (which is important for power supply noise rejection) and the harmonics at 7kHz were -80dB or lower than the fundamental. 

Crosstalk

Low channel to channel crosstalk ensures good stereo separation.  I consider anything less than -40dB @ 10kHz acceptable and anything less than -80dB to be superb.  The Outlaw RR2150 exhibited good, though not stellar crosstalk performance with about -50dB at 10kHz of isolation between the channels.

RR2150-xtalk 

Outlaw RR2150 Crosstalk Measurement at Rated Power

 

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Recent Forum Posts:

PENG posts on January 07, 2018 10:30
Robertotron, post: 1227607, member: 84553
I'm leaning heavily toward buying this model. Pretty excited about learning about it , as it's the only receiver I can made tolerate looking at or operating in about 25 years.
I favor it over the 2160 because of the knobs.
I'll be using it 80% to play music off my PC and 20% from Phono. (With a pair of 6ohm Polk RT7s if possible)
Can someone please comment more about using the USB-in to play Spotify & Music Files off my PC?
I've never heard of doing this and wonder if it's reliable..
Someone above mentioned a $200 upgrade to add another digital input.
Can I have a link to info on this Please?

If you buying it for the look that's a good reason but may be the only reason. Otherwise, you are much better off getting an AVR-X3300W that often goes on sale for $599 brand new. The output power rating and bench test results (also by Audioholics) are similar between the two. Even if you strictly use the unit for two channel, the AVR still has the edge because of the much richer feature set, and the build in excellent bass management, REQ etc.

The RR2160's USB is limited to 16GB thumb drive, the USB-b can be used with your PC but it appears to play PCM only. The Denon AVR can play DSD up to 5.6 MHz. I have no idea what the $200 to add another digital output is about, why kind of digital input are they referring to?
Robertotron posts on January 06, 2018 15:11
I'm leaning heavily toward buying this model. Pretty excited about learning about it , as it's the only receiver I can made tolerate looking at or operating in about 25 years.
I favor it over the 2160 because of the knobs.
I'll be using it 80% to play music off my PC and 20% from Phono. (With a pair of 6ohm Polk RT7s if possible)
Can someone please comment more about using the USB-in to play Spotify & Music Files off my PC?
I've never heard of doing this and wonder if it's reliable..
Someone above mentioned a $200 upgrade to add another digital input.
Can I have a link to info on this Please?
slipperybidness posts on March 20, 2015 08:48
HK990vxi, post: 1076127, member: 72533
I just purchased the Outlaw 2150 and am disappointed! I have a Harman Kardon 990vxi that I absolutely loved (started having trouble with the right channel cutting out and decided to give the Outlaw a try rather than going through another round of repairs). I have a pair of Dahlquist DQ-12s that provide sound quality that places any instrument right there in the room with you. The HK has a fullness and punch through these speakers that the Outlaw doesn't seem to have. Is there much of a difference after the break-in period? How long?
Why don't you call up Outlaw directly and discuss it with them?
HK990vxi posts on March 19, 2015 22:14
I just purchased the Outlaw 2150 and am disappointed! I have a Harman Kardon 990vxi that I absolutely loved (started having trouble with the right channel cutting out and decided to give the Outlaw a try rather than going through another round of repairs). I have a pair of Dahlquist DQ-12s that provide sound quality that places any instrument right there in the room with you. The HK has a fullness and punch through these speakers that the Outlaw doesn't seem to have. Is there much of a difference after the break-in period? How long?
gfmucci posts on December 18, 2014 21:41
I have a dilemma. I am torn between this amp for $699, versus the new Yamaha A-S801 for $899. This amp has a basic DAC with USB in. The Yamaha has a more sophisticated DAC with all three types of digital ins. For me it boils down to the difference in quality of the audio output. If I needed to upgrade the DAC capability, I could always spend the $200 difference on that upgrade for the Outlaw. My primary sources will be from my desktop computer with its generic sound card and Kindles. The desktop will send via USB cable. The Kindle via Bluetooth. I will be driving a pair of Definitive 8040s that run on 6 ohms.
Your thoughts, please.
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