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Denon AVR-X4000 Features Continued & Build Quality

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For the Audiophile

You might be thinking, “Great, this is just another receiver that has thrown audiophiles to the curb in favor of mainstream consumers.” Well, Mr. Scrooge, you would be wrong. The AVR-X4000 weighs in at a respectable, though not record setting, 27 pounds and can put out 125wpc (8 ohms, 20Hz-20kHz, 0.05% THD). You might see the X4000 marketed at 165wpc, but that’s at 6 ohms, 1kHz, 0.7% THD. I didn’t measure the actual power output (Gene’s a real stickler on how it’s done and I’m fresh out of electrical engineering degrees); however, I did pull off the top panel and take a look at the guts. It was difficult to see much without actually removing boards, but I was able to find a nice pair of 12,000uF, 71V power capacitors, which average to slightly above average in this price range. The power rating on the back panel is an impressive 630w, but one always needs to be careful when assessing power from this rating, as you can’t quite be sure the measurement method used. The bracing and heatsinks aren’t quite as impressive as the Yamaha RX-A1010 or RX-A2020 receivers we reviewed, but seem adequate. I ran the receiver for long periods of time and it always stayed cool.

 

Denon AVR-X4000 Capacitors

Denon AVR-X4000 Power Capacitors

The X4000 has a total of 7 internal amplifiers, 11 pairs of binding posts, and full 11.2 preouts + stereo preouts for zones 2 and 3. The internal amps can be configured in every way imaginable, and done so easily with helpful onscreen guides. Even though it only has 7 internal amps, it can support up to a 9.2 system with the use of an external 2ch. amplifier. You could also opt to run a 5.1 system and bi-amp the mains. Or, if you have two sets of main speakers (one set for home theater, the other for music) you can configure the X4000 to automatically switch to the preferred set based on the material. What this means is, if you are listening to a multichannel source it will use the HT speakers, but as soon as you kick the receiver into 2ch. or stereo mode, it will turn on the other set of speakers. What’s even cooler is that both sets can be configured independently (size, level, distance, crossover).

Denon AVR-X4000 Internal Angle 

Denon AVR-X4000 Top Panel Removed

Once you have selected the proper amp configuration, you can manually adjust each speaker. A global crossover can be used, or set individually at: 40Hz, 60Hz, 80Hz, 90Hz, 100Hz, 110Hz, 120Hz, 150Hz, 200Hz, or 250Hz. Distance can be set in .1 foot increments and level at .5dB.

One of the biggest features of the X4000 is that it comes equipped with Audyssey MultEQ XT32 (MultEQ Pro ready) and Sub EQ HT. MultEQ XT32 is Audyssey’s flagship room correction system with much finer resolution that any other version, and this is the first time it’s featured on a Denon receiver in this price range. SubEQ HT is also making its first appearance in this class for Denon, and I’m pretty excited to see it included. At Audioholics, we always recommend using multiple subwoofers, but the results can be disastrous if not setup properly (as you will see later in this review). SubEQ HT calibrates dual subwoofers in a two-step process. First, it measures the level and delay of each sub separately. Second, it plays both subs simultaneously to figure out the room correction filter.

Editor’s Note: I would quickly like to point out that SubEQ HT is an additional feature above and beyond MultEQ XT32. Many people believe they come together; however, they are in no way packaged together. For example, the Onkyo TX-NR818 has MultEQ XT32, but not SubEQ HT.

For the Installer

The AVR-X4000 is packed with all of the inputs, outputs, and advanced configuration options any custom installer could ask for. It has: 7 HDMI in/3 out, 5 composite in/3 out, 2 component in/1 out, 7 stereo analog in/1 out, and 2 optical and 2 digital coax inputs. Not mentioned in that mix is a Denon Link HD connection (if you have to ask, then just ignore it), and stereo audio preouts for zones 2 and 3. Inputs are easily assigned, hidden, and/or renamed in the system menu. The reason the X4000 has so many different video outputs is for zone 2 support. You can run an independent video feed from the main zone to zone 2 using composite, component, or HDMI. Yes, zone 2 can pull the same or different HDMI signal than the main zone. It can also take audio from HDMI, and send it out through the zone 2 preouts, eliminating the need to hook up HDMI and analog audio cables from sources. But, poor zone 3 doesn’t have any sort of video output, and only supports HDMI when “All Zone Stereo” is used. Both zones always support digital coax and optical as well. Additionally, each zone can be renamed, and the name change is reflected on the receiver’s front display and mobile app. For an installer, this means you never have to use the word “zone” with a client. You also don’t have to worry about what’s going on in one zone interfering with the other zones. The only limitation is that just one network feature can be used at a time. For example, you cannot listen to Pandora in one zone while listening to Spotify in another. But, I do not believe any receiver exists that can do that, at any price. The last point to note about the X4000’s multi-zone capabilities is its extensive speaker setup options in each zone. You can adjust the max volume, power on volume, bass, treble, high pass filter, left and right speaker levels. As far as multi-room capabilities, I have never come across a $1299 receiver that can do everything the AVR-X4000 can. Heck, many receivers in the $2000 dollar range can’t do all of this.

 Denon AVR-X4000 Rear Panel

Denon AVR-X4000 Rear Panel

As for advanced configuration, the AVR-X4000 is about as flexible as they come. It has dual 12v volt triggers, an RS-232C connection, and IR in/out for use with IR repeaters. It also supports HDMI standby pass through, but you can’t change the HDMI input without turning on the receiver. A list of 4 favorite buttons across the middle of the remote allow for easy access “favorite” material. The buttons can take you to a particular input, radio station, or even a specific favorite song stored on the network. However, oddly enough they won’t take you a specific folder or Pandora station. Pandora, as a source, can be saved as a favorite, but not a particular station. As for DLNA, specifying a particular folder would be really nice so you don’t have to drill down through folders every time you startup the service.

 

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Recent Forum Posts:

YAGI1980 posts on January 12, 2017 04:27
Hello.
I have a Denon AVR X4000 but I don't now how to manually setup speakers impedance to 8 ohms.
Please a little help!
Tnx!
PENG posts on March 05, 2014 07:20
ReUpRo, post: 1021322
In typical Owner Manual style, that's neither here nor there. I'll PM Gene and see if he can get someone from Denon to give an unequivocal response.
True. This is mostly a gimmick since one can buy a dedicated pre-pro for the cost of that AVR.

Thanks in advance. By the way turning off the power amp completely does has some “green” merit and should help the unit run a touch (very little I guess) cooler. Even just disconnecting the input has some green merit but not much at all, just a side note, still nothing to do with SQ. I suppose it also depends on the power supply design, if the prepro section has its own completely independent power supply then in preamp mode I would expect the power amp side power supply to be deenergized, in theory anyway. I do doubt that is the case for the 4311 and 4520 but I am sure Gene could find out if he wants to.
ReUpRo posts on March 04, 2014 23:31
PENG, post: 1021295
I read that before but not sure if it is just internet hearsay or fact. Page 98 of the manual says “When the preamplifier mode is used, the built-in amplifier operation of this unit is stopped, and interference to the preamplifier from the power amplifier can be reduced”.
In typical Owner Manual style, that's neither here nor there. I'll PM Gene and see if he can get someone from Denon to give an unequivocal response.
PENG, post: 1021295
I believe most people won't notice a difference regardless. it is a feature that may make some people happier, but then those people probably don't believe in AVR to begin with.
True. This is mostly a gimmick since one can buy a dedicated pre-pro for the cost of that AVR.
PENG posts on March 04, 2014 19:12
ReUpRo, post: 1021180
The receiver only disconnects the amps from inputs without shutting them off. I wonder why Denon chose to implement it like that?

I read that before but not sure if it is just internet hearsay or fact. Page 98 of the manual says “When the preamplifier mode is used, the built-in amplifier operation of this unit is stopped, and interference to the preamplifier from the power amplifier can be reduced”.

I believe most people won't notice a difference regardless. it is a feature that may make some people happier, but then those people probably don't believe in AVR to begin with.
dwaleke posts on March 04, 2014 13:03
There are a few sites that sell the X4000 for ~$899 shipped new.
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