“Let our rigorous testing and reviews be your guidelines to A/V equipment – not marketing slogans”
Facebook Youtube Twitter instagram pinterest

Pioneer SP-FS52/SP-BS22 and SW-8MK2 Subwoofer Measurements

By

 

SP-FS52 Impedance.JPG

Impedance / Phase Measurement of the Pioneer SP-FS52 Tower Speaker

The Pioneer SP-FS52 speakers appear to be tuned at around 50Hz as indicated by the saddle point in the impedance graph.  I measured the impedance of both speakers and they tracked pretty darn closely.  In fact, they tracked better than the more expensive Infinity P363’s I recently measured.  This demonstrates that Pioneer expended great efforts for quality control of their products.  I must commend Pioneer for rating this as a 6 ohm speaker despite the fact that it would be rated as an 8 ohm system by the IEC method, since it doesn’t dip below 6.4 ohms.  I would call this an 8 ohm speaker. You should have no fears powering them on a modest priced A/V receiver.

SP-BS22 Impedance.JPG 

Impedance / Phase Measurement of the Pioneer SP-BS22-LR Bookshelf Speaker

The Pioneer SP-BS22-LR speakers appear to be tuned at around 70Hz as indicated by the saddle point in the impedance graph.  I measured the impedance of both speakers and they again tracked very closely indicating Pioneer expended great efforts for quality control of their products.  This is a true 6 ohm speaker as Pioneer rates it and it’s a bit more of a demanding load than the towers as a result.

 SP-C22 Impedance.JPG

Impedance / Phase Measurement of the Pioneer SP-C22 Center Speaker

The Pioneer SP-C22 speakers appear to be tuned at around 70Hz as indicated by the saddle point in the impedance graph.  Like the SP-BS22-LR, this is a true 6 ohm speaker as Pioneer rates it and it’s a bit more of a demanding load than the towers as a result.

SP-FS52 listening window.JPG 

 In-room 1 meter Listening Window Response: Pioneer SP-FS52 (1/12rd octave smoothed)

I measured the Pioneer SP-FS52 at 1 meter with the mic position slightly below the tweeter axis for the on-axis measurement and then averaged that response with 15 & 30 degree horizontal off-axis and 15 degrees off-axis vertically to formulate a listening window response.  That response was then spliced with a ½ meter groundplane measurement at 300 Hz to produce the graph above.  Pioneer specs this speaker as 87dB sensitivity but it looks to me more like around 86dB (not factoring in the rise in treble response). 

This is a darn good response for a pair of modest priced towers.  The SP-FS52’s exhibited usable bass extension down to 50Hz and a very linear response through the midrange.  I did notice a slight elevation in treble response as can be seen by the rise in high frequency output above 8kHz.  I asked Mr. Jones about this and he said it was done in part to counter grille losses and also considering the typical buyer of this speaker likely won’t be angling the speaker towards the listening area and would appreciate an elevated treble response.  This measurement pretty much confirmed what I was hearing, a very airy and detailed speaker with a slight emphasis in the upper registers. 

SP-FS52 grille measure.JPG 

In-room 2ft Frequency Response Comparison: Pioneer SP-FS52 (1/12rd octave smoothed)
Purple trace: no grille ; Green trace: with grille

Pioneer did a really nice job of minimizing grille losses thanks to the tightly wrapped grille cloth over the frame.  You can see about a 1-2dB loss in output above 5kHz but this may be welcomed for those that find the SP-FS52’s a bit too bright for their listening preferences.  This is one instance I may actually advise to leave the grilles on.

SP-BS22 listening window.JPG

In-room 1 meter Listening Window Response: Pioneer SP-BS22 (1/12rd octave smoothed)

I measured the Pioneer SP-BS22 at 1 meter with the mic position slightly below the tweeter axis for the on-axis measurement and then averaged that response with 15 & 30 degree horizontal off-axis and 15 degrees off-axis vertically to formulate a listening window response.  That response was then spliced with a ½ meter groundplane measurement at 300 Hz to produce the graph above.  Pioneer specs this speaker as 85dB sensitivity and that’s exactly what I measured.  The SP-BS22 measured the most linearly out of all the speakers in this review.  It displayed usable bass extension down to about 60Hz (perfect for blending with a good sub) and it measured flat out to 20kHz. 

SP-C22 listening window.JPG

In-room 1 meter Listening Window Response: Pioneer SP-C22 (1/12rd octave smoothed)

I measured the Pioneer SP-C22 at 1 meter with the mic position slightly above the tweeter axis for the on-axis measurement and then averaged that response with 15 & 30 degree horizontal off-axis and 15 degrees off-axis vertically to formulate a listening window response.  That response was then spliced with a ½ meter groundplane measurement at 300 Hz to produce the graph above.  Pioneer specs this speaker as 88dB sensitivity though I measured about 87dB.  The SP-C22 being placed horizontally was at a disadvantage just as all MTMs are but this is how it was intended to be used.   In reality a small dip like this in the mid frequencies will ameliorate any harshness that is often in the movie soundtrack so it’s not such a bad thing.  The SP-C22 displayed usable bass extension down to about 70Hz with an elevated treble response, slightly more pronounced than what the towers exhibited.  This confirmed my listening tests that the SP-C22 was a bit bright, though not fatiguing as some speakers thanks to the well executed tweeter design.

 tower+sub_freq.JPG

In-room ½ Meter Groundplane Measurement: SW-8MKii Subwoofer Superimposed over SP-FS52

The SW-8MKii won’t shake your house or rattle your bones.  It’s a small budget sub meant to supplement the bass of this system.  You can see it does just that when I superimpose and level match its response with the SP-FS52 towers.  You get a little over ½ octave bass extension using this sub in conjunction with the towers.  The sub rolls off at 36 dB/octave around 35Hz which is a few Hz below its published specified frequency response.  What I found surprising is how Mr. Jones expended extra care to keep the sub flat in its passband.  You typically find very peaky response in budget products like this. 

 

Confused about what AV Gear to buy or how to set it up? Join our Exclusive Audioholics E-Book Membership Program!

Recent Forum Posts:

MLadia posts on February 09, 2021 13:18
shadyJ, post: 1306360, member: 20472
There would almost certainly be an improvement.
Ran into this old post. I eventually got an Infinity REFERENCE RC263.
shadyJ posts on March 21, 2019 18:35
MLadia, post: 1306353, member: 87319
Would it be an improvement to use another Floor-standing SP-FS552 as my center instead of the Pioneer SP-C22? Btw, I replaced the original Pioneer sub with 2 Dayton 1200s.
There would almost certainly be an improvement.
MLadia posts on March 21, 2019 18:02
Would it be an improvement to use another Floor-standing SP-FS552 as my center instead of the Pioneer SP-C22? Btw, I replaced the original Pioneer sub with 2 Dayton 1200s.
Dazz Wryght posts on March 20, 2018 14:45
Dazz Wryght, post: 1233567, member: 83977
I hope someone is still watching this thread,

I bought the Pioneer FS-52s, the SP-C22, and the SW-8MK2. I have yet to buy the SP-BS22-LR, I'm using some no name towers I had as surrounds for now.

My receiver is a Onkyo TX-NR646.

I set up the crossovers to 80Hz for all the Pioneers and 100Hz for the surrounds since the drivers are so small. I'm using the LFE for the SW-8MK2 set at 120Hz (max on my receiver). I've been consuming a mix of streaming video (Netflix, Hulu, etc.), streaming music (Spotify, Apple Music, etc.), and gaming on an XboxOne S. I've been happy with the sound in my semi-open 2600 cu-ft living room.

Recently, I found the AccuEQ mic for my TX-NR646. So I plugged it up to see what results it would produce. It got all my distances spot on. I've measured them myself previously. However, it crossover my towers at 50Hz, center at 70Hz, and surrounds at 90Hz. I immediately thought this was wrong and manually set everything back. Much reading had me convinced that 80Hz was the way to go.

After reading this article it seems that the towers are tuned to 50HZ with the center at 70Hz. So was AccuEQ correct? Should I give it a listen, or stick with 80Hz?

Update: I grabbed a pair of SP-BS22-LRs for $68 at Fry's. They are now in the rear position. I also ditched the SW8-MK2 for a pair of SVS SB12-NSDs.
Dazz Wryght posts on February 15, 2018 11:13
j_garcia, post: 1233598, member: 10856
My Pre uses a proprietary EQ and it does some things I don't agree with also, but the end result does seem to be that it does a decent job. So it isn't always perfect in terms of what our preferences might be or what we think we hear, but knowing what the system “thinks” is correct is a good starting point to tweak from.

I got the kids and the wife to be quiet for 10 mins while I ran AccuEQ. I put a camera tripod on my couch in the ‘sweet spot’ with the mic sitting at about ear level… ish. AccuEQ produced pretty much the same results I discarded previously. I then switched to 2.1 to listen to some music. I grabbed a handful of CDs to listen.

Jimi Hendrix's “Purple Haze” and “Foxy Lady” had a detail to them that I don't think I've ever noticed before. Sticking with this CD I played Jimi's “National Anthem” and WOW! I never noticed that there's a drummer playing rapid kicks and snare trills in the background.

I wasn't listening at a loud level. Sadly, my receiver only displays relative volume and not dB level. Turned up to about 40, which is where my family normally has it for family TV watching, I was impressed.

I then switched to movies and 5.1. I played the opening scene from “The Lion King” on Blu-Ray (DTS-MA), which was apropos being I just saw the play at the Fox, Atlanta with the misses. There was so much more immersion in sound. Birds flying by head, and elephants making my bookshelf shake. I tested again with “Rio” on Blu-Ray. The opening scene had me forgetting I was at home and not at my local Regal RPX.

There's still more testing to do. All of my TV watching is on streaming services, then there's also video games to test.

So far so good,

Thanks again.
Post Reply