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JL Audio E-Sub e110 and e112 Subwoofers Measurements & Analysis

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The JL Audio e110 and e112 subwoofers were both measured while placed outdoors on the ground in a large field with the nearest large objects a minimum of 60ft or farther away from it, with the driver facing towards the microphone element. The left RCA input was used and an ACO Pacific 7012 measurement microphone was placed on the ground at a distance of 2 meters from the nearest enclosure face of the subwoofer and pointing towards the driver. The amplifier was set to maximum gain, the phase was set to zero and the low pass filter was set to bypass for all measurements unless otherwise noted. For more info on the testing equipment and procedures please see the article here.

 Powered Subwoofer Testing Outline and Procedures Overview


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JL Audio e112: Effect of Low Pass Filter Settings on Frequency Response

Above are the frequency response measurements of the e112 subwoofer showing how adjustment of the internal low pass filter affects the top end response shape. The roll off slope is 24dB/octave. The resulting roll off point was a bit below that indicated by the setting on the dial. The e110 subwoofer performed in a very similar manner so its results will not be shown.

e112 e110 base fr.jpg 

JL Audio e110 and e112: Basic Frequency Response as Tested

Above is the frequency response of both the e110 and e112 subwoofers with the internal low pass filters disabled. The shape and slope of the roll off on the low end of both the e110 and e112 indicate that there is some low frequency boost employed internally and that there is what appears to be a 12dB/octave high pass filter that comes into effect below 20Hz and combines with the sealed systems natural 12dB/octave roll off to produce a 24dB/octave total slope. The e112 response fits within a 6dB total window from 19-135Hz. The e110 fits within the same 6dB total window over a frequency range of 21-143Hz. The overall response shape of both systems is fairly close with the e112 having a bit of extra low-end extension. Even with the low pass filter defeated on both units the top end extension is fairly limited but is enough so that the crossover point to the other speakers in the system could be effectively set to around 130Hz.

 e110 e112 group delay.jpg

JL Audio e110 and e112: Group Delay

Group delay measurements for the E series JL’s are well mannered and show nothing of consequence. Neither subwoofer approaches 1 cycle of delay at any point over its entire useful bandwidth.

e110 long term output.jpg 

JL Audio e110: Long-Term Power Compression

e112 long term output.jpg 

JL Audio e112: Long-Term Power Compression

The long-term output compression tests for the smaller e110 subwoofer show negligible compression through the nominal 100dB sweep. Compression sets in first in the 20-25Hz area and by the 110dB nominal sweep the e110 is out of headroom full bandwidth. The little e110 manages to produce more than 93dB at 20Hz, passes 100dB at about 28Hz and produces over 105dB above 35Hz during the loudest sweep. The e112 performs quite similarly to the smaller e110 but exhibits greater low bass power. It also remains free of significant compression through the 100dB nominal sweep before exhibiting compression in the 20-25Hz area during the 105dB nominal sweep. By the 110dB nominal sweep it is out of gas. The bigger e112 leverages the larger driver and a bit of extra stroke to manage about 97dB at 20Hz, 101dB at 30Hz and about 109dB at 38Hz. Both subwoofers exhibit some thermal compression from heating of the voice coil in the repeat 90dB base level measurement conducted immediately after the rest of the measurements. Neither subwoofer made any overtly bad noises during these measurements. Other than a bit of distortion and a bit of “grumble” and distortion from the drivers near 20Hz on the loudest sweeps, there was no distress to report. The E series subs are very well protected against being overdriven or otherwise damaged. 

Note on Output Compression Testing: This is by far the most demanding measurement type conducted on the subwoofers during our testing and will reveal any issues with overload, port compression, port noise, driver distress, creaks, rattles, buzzes, etc. Additionally the test is conducted outdoors with just the subwoofer operating so there will be no nearby walls or objects to vibrate and no upper frequency content from other speakers in operation. These would normally help to cover up or mask any objectionable noises from the subwoofer in a typical room. Any sort of audible distress or issues with the subwoofer are readily apparent in this environment.

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JL Audio e110: Output Compression Magnitude

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JL Audio e112: Output Compression Magnitude

Looking at the amount of compression occurring in the e110 and e112 subwoofers in the graphs presented above shows that both are very well behaved until the 105dB nominal sweeps where both start to exhibit notable compression near 20-25hz as both are out of output in this frequency range. Asking the E series subwoofers for a further 5dB increase in output past this point causes them to fall into compression in the upper bass register as well where the output is now some 3 to 4dB less than it should be. As noted previously neither subwoofer showed any signs of being in danger of damage by driving them this far into compression. Judging from the measurement data as a whole it appears that both subwoofers employ significant boost in the 20-25Hz region to flatten their response.  

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JL Audio e110: CEA2010 2 Meter Ground-plane RMS Results

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JL Audio e112: CEA2010 2 Meter Ground-plane RMS Results

CEA2010 Results

The CEA2010 maximum-distortion-limited-short-term output results for the JL Audio E series subwoofers are shown above. The e110 is a mighty little beast. It manages to produce well over 110dB from 50-125Hz which would explain why it packs quite a thump with kick drums. On the low end it still manages a passing 93.3dB at 20Hz and even manages a passing 16Hz at 89.1dB. Not exactly records by any means but for a single sealed 10” driver it is more than respectable. At 31.5Hz and above the e110 was amplifier limited and below that the distortion was the limiting factor as the e110 will put out a bit more in the deep bass if distortion is ignored. Pushing it for all it is worth at 20Hz it will muster up about 96dB. The bigger e112 with a 12” driver and slightly stronger amplifier puts out a little more as expected. At 63Hz the e112 managed to burst 115dB flat and is still well over 110dB at 40Hz. In the deep bass is where the larger driver, enclosure and amplifier of the e112 come into effect. This allows the e112 to produce about 3-4dB higher maximum output than the e110 below 40Hz. The e112 produced 97.5dB at 20Hz and 92.6dB at 16Hz while passing the CEA-2010 distortion thresholds. It even managed a passing score of 87.7dB at 12.5Hz. As with the e110 the e112 was amplifier limited above the 31.5Hz band but was distortion limited below that point and would produce another 3-4dB if pushed to its limit in the deep bass. Maximum output at 20Hz was recorded as 100.5dB without regard for distortion. When comparing the CEA-2010 short-term burst output to the maximum outputs reached during the sine sweep testing reveals that the E series exhibits 3 to 5dB of extra output with shorter term signals. This may be partly due to a protection circuit that dials back the power when the signals are of very long duration in order to prevent overheating of the voice coil.

 

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Recent Forum Posts:

shadyJ posts on March 15, 2021 12:59
Hubbard32, post: 1468458, member: 93682
Hey Joshua,

Sorry to resurrect an old review, but it was very helpful.

I have 2 e110s on order right now for my 17’x17’x 8’ (2300 cu ft) room where we listen to music and watch movies (60% music,40% movies). In this size room do you feel that the JLs will deliver the fullness and punch I’m looking for? I will be calibrating the room with the help of DIRAC through my Monolith HTP-1.

im also entertaining the idea of attempting to blend these e110s with my existing James Loudspeaker EBU1200 12” sub to help lend a bit of low end support to movies. I would value your opinion on using these subs together and if you feel this will only harm the performance of the JL subs.

thank you in advance!
Josh hasn't posted here since 2016. Don't be too hopeful for a reply.
Hubbard32 posts on March 15, 2021 11:13
Ricci, post: 1031514, member: 56121
Thanks Erin. The JL's are nice subs. I'm a big sub kinda guy and I usually come away underwhelmed with the small sealed units but these have more balls than most.
Hey Joshua,

Sorry to resurrect an old review, but it was very helpful.

I have 2 e110s on order right now for my 17’x17’x 8’ (2300 cu ft) room where we listen to music and watch movies (60% music,40% movies). In this size room do you feel that the JLs will deliver the fullness and punch I’m looking for? I will be calibrating the room with the help of DIRAC through my Monolith HTP-1.

im also entertaining the idea of attempting to blend these e110s with my existing James Loudspeaker EBU1200 12” sub to help lend a bit of low end support to movies. I would value your opinion on using these subs together and if you feel this will only harm the performance of the JL subs.

thank you in advance!
haraldo posts on September 04, 2016 10:35
haraldo, post: 1081400, member: 32412
I'm really questioning why they do this …. it seems very strange to me, I'm sure they could use damping too….

Ref Jim's review here where he opened up the sub to see no damping inside: www.hometheatershack.com/forums/speaker-subwoofer-reviews/73616-jl-audio-e112-subwoofer-review.html

This us the answer I got from Barry @ JL Audio as to why there's no dampiimg inside:
The concept of “damping material” is
a) relatively useless at low frequencies
b) really useless if there are no cabinet resonances

Even if the cabinet were to vibrate, that signal would be so far down in dB relative to the actual output that it wouldn't make any difference.

The JL subs have long throw drivers. The way the cabinets are constructed we are mainly concerned with the air pressure in front of the driver.
Majico Garcia posts on September 04, 2016 09:42
Hello Joshua.

What was it about the E Series that actually impressed you more than the Fathom series?

Is there more output?

Is the esub more musical?
haraldo posts on April 27, 2015 02:32
KEW, post: 1081373, member: 41838
Are you sure it has no detrimental consequences?
I think they could definitely use some damping!

I'm really questioning why they do this …. it seems very strange to me, I'm sure they could use damping too….

Ref Jim's review here where he opened up the sub to see no damping inside: www.hometheatershack.com/forums/speaker-subwoofer-reviews/73616-jl-audio-e112-subwoofer-review.html
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