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Audyssey Unveils New Individually Calibrated Microphones for Use with MultEQ-X

by March 16, 2022
Audyssey ACM1-X Calibrated Mic

Audyssey ACM1-X Calibrated Mic

Los Angeles, CA – Audyssey, a leader in audio technology for the home, automotive and commercial theater markets, has unveiled the new ACM1-X calibrated microphone as a companion accessory to its recently announced MultEQ-X room-correction software. The microphone enables measurements to be corrected to a near-perfect match to those of a “type 1” reference microphone.

Each Audyssey ACM1-X microphone is individually measured at Audyssey's laboratory in Los Angeles, CA. Once calibrated, a serial number is assigned, and a unique calibration file is created. MultEQ-X users who purchase an ACM1-X microphone then log in to MultEQ-X and, on either of the pages that have a mic selection option, select “Add New Mic.” From there they enter the microphone serial number, and the mic file is then downloaded and stored within the MultEQ-X application. Once the microphone and app are successfully paired, the user can attach the microphone to their AVR to perform MultEQ room correction to perfect their listening environment.

MultEQ-X is a powerful new software application for calibrating many home theater AVRs that have Audyssey’s MultEQ room equalization technology built-in. MultEQ-X brings users greater control over calibration parameters and more detailed information about their room acoustics.

MultEQ-X represents an important step forward in room correction in that it decouples the delivery of technology from the delivery of hardware. This new app-based platform ensures that MultEQ-X users will be the first to experience many of the improvements and advancements to the MultEQ suite of software/firmware room correction tools that are currently under development.

Audyssey MultEQ-X New Features & Mic Youtube Discussion

The Audyssey ACM1-X microphone is available now on Amazon for an introductory price of $79.99.

Audyssey MultEQ-X is available for download now at the Microsoft Store. For more information about Audyssey’s full range of consumer and B2B audio technologies, please visit www.audyssey.com.

About Audyssey

Established in 2002, Audyssey is the industry leader in research-based audio technologies that correct acoustic problems to improve the sound quality of any device or listening environment. The company’s technologies are integrated into home theater products, automobiles, movie theaters and more from industry-leading manufacturers. For more information, visit http://www.audyssey.com or follow us on LinkedIn and Facebook.

 

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Recent Forum Posts:

Golfx posts on March 31, 2022 16:33
TLS Guy, post: 1546873, member: 29650
So, there is trouble below the transition frequency. In a high powered speaker like that with a lot of power below 600 Hz, there will be room dependent problems.

Eq, very likely will help this.

However, I think Perlisten made a huge error of judgement not to make this speaker active, at least partially. When you design and build a potent speaker like that, it is going to be very room/position sensitive. If it were active, then the output below transition could have been made easily variable. That is why my front three have continuously variable baffle step compensation. My rears allow considerable trimming of BSC, and the surrounds have two choices of where the transition starts. These are the smallest of the seven main speakers, not including the ceiling speakers.

The active control settings of the front three speakers and the rear backs, are very different between my old room in Benedict and the one here in Eagan. The design made transferring the speakers between the two locations a simple endeavor under instrument control.

The other issue is the Perlistens are still a resonant design. In a speaker with prodigious power in the last two octaves having non resonant aperiodic bass alignment is a huge advantage. Unfortunately since the death of John Wright of TDL, less people have had the opportunity to experience it than heretofore.

I started design work on my front three early 2000s, after George Augspurger published his TL model. Modelling software created by George can be downloaded from my website and is available to all. Quite a few DIYers have now downloaded it. It really is a pity no one has used this model to offer commercial offerings.

I think in a state of the art speaker, the deign should now be fully active. I did not make my high pass crossover to the tweeters active, because at that time I could not justify power amps to drive tweeters. However, if I were designing it now, with what is available I would have done an entirely active design.

The other issue I have with Perlisten's design is having crossovers right in the most sensitive part of the speech discrimination band. Don't get me wrong, the crossovers are very good, but not perfect, as there is no perfect solution. You can see the imperfections in the data you published. Unfortunately experience has taught me that the ear is just devilishly sensitive to phase and level aberrations in this region. I have a personal rule of no crossovers from 800 Hz to 2.5 KHz, and if possible, not between 500 Hz and 4 KHz. Unfortunately that really restricts your selection of eligible drivers.

Dang, poor Perlisten. They should have consulted you before designing and making their critically acclaimed speakers. What were they thinking?
PENG posts on March 31, 2022 09:57
EBN, post: 1549116, member: 82603
You must be most negative person i have seen in any audio forum for last 20years. You bash Audussey while have only used the anemic XT version not the better XT32 with editor app which let`s you limit the correction if required and remove bbc dip. It also comes with higher filter resolution and more effective correction for low frequencies which @PENG has shown to be quite close to Dirac Live.

You also bash most mainstream speakers even without hearing them, but same time you always praice your butt ugly DIY speakers like they would be gift from god.

I wanted to give you grumpy grandpa award, but this will have to do for now.



To be fair, his speakers/room seems like a winner, based on the FR graphs he posted so far. So he likely won't gain much if anything at all by using any sort of REQ, Dirac, Trinnov or whatever. I do think and have suggested to him, that he shouldn't discourage (not that he did directly, but could have left such an impression by being so negative about it, without reservation…) others to try using REQ.
EBN posts on March 30, 2022 11:23
TLS Guy, post: 1546873, member: 29650
So, there is trouble below the transition frequency. In a high powered speaker like that with a lot of power below 600 Hz, there will be room dependent problems.

Eq, very likely will help this.

However, I think Perlisten made a huge error of judgement not to make this speaker active, at least partially. When you design and build a potent speaker like that, it is going to be very room/position sensitive. If it were active, then the output below transition could have been made easily variable. That is why my front three have continuously variable baffle step compensation. My rears allow considerable trimming of BSC, and the surrounds have two choices of where the transition starts. These are the smallest of the seven main speakers, not including the ceiling speakers.

The active control settings of the front three speakers and the rear backs, are very different between my old room in Benedict and the one here in Eagan. The design made transferring the speakers between the two locations a simple endeavor under instrument control.

The other issue is the Perlistens are still a resonant design. In a speaker with prodigious power in the last two octaves having non resonant aperiodic bass alignment is a huge advantage. Unfortunately since the death of John Wright of TDL, less people have had the opportunity to experience it than heretofore.

I started design work on my front three early 2000s, after George Augspurger published his TL model. Modelling software created by George can be downloaded from my website and is available to all. Quite a few DIYers have now downloaded it. It really is a pity no one has used this model to offer commercial offerings.

I think in a state of the art speaker, the deign should now be fully active. I did not make my high pass crossover to the tweeters active, because at that time I could not justify power amps to drive tweeters. However, if I were designing it now, with what is available I would have done an entirely active design.

The other issue I have with Perlisten's design is having crossovers right in the most sensitive part of the speech discrimination band. Don't get me wrong, the crossovers are very good, but not perfect, as there is no perfect solution. You can see the imperfections in the data you published. Unfortunately experience has taught me that the ear is just devilishly sensitive to phase and level aberrations in this region. I have a personal rule of no crossovers from 800 Hz to 2.5 KHz, and if possible, not between 500 Hz and 4 KHz. Unfortunately that really restricts your selection of eligible drivers.

You must be most negative person i have seen in any audio forum for last 20years. You bash Audussey while have only used the anemic XT version not the better XT32 with editor app which let`s you limit the correction if required and remove bbc dip. It also comes with higher filter resolution and more effective correction for low frequencies which @PENG has shown to be quite close to Dirac Live.

You also bash most mainstream speakers even without hearing them, but same time you always praice your ugly DIY speakers like they would be gift from god.

I wanted to give you grumpy grandpa award, but this will have to do for now.

Auditor55 posts on March 29, 2022 18:05
GalZohar, post: 1547692, member: 96377
I don't actually understand why Denon doesn't just buy it to bundle with AVRs, they could probably get it for a lot less than 200$ (as the development cost is the same regardless of how many units use it, and a lot more units will use it), and it would help marketing s less people will claim how bad Audyssey is because they just calibrated trough the AVR and never bothered with the 20$ or 200$ app which you have to both know about and be willing to pay for without being able to fully understand the benefits. Can't really compare it to something like DLBC which is supposedly a different level of algorithms (although it does share some arguments). For Audyssey this is really just a better interface to existing technology and doesn't have any ground breaking algorithms, and probably has a high price tag simply because they need to cover the development costs with a relatively small number of sales.
Waiting for someone to actually use it and report back.
GalZohar posts on March 23, 2022 18:49
I don't actually understand why Denon doesn't just buy it to bundle with AVRs, they could probably get it for a lot less than 200$ (as the development cost is the same regardless of how many units use it, and a lot more units will use it), and it would help marketing s less people will claim how bad Audyssey is because they just calibrated trough the AVR and never bothered with the 20$ or 200$ app which you have to both know about and be willing to pay for without being able to fully understand the benefits. Can't really compare it to something like DLBC which is supposedly a different level of algorithms (although it does share some arguments). For Audyssey this is really just a better interface to existing technology and doesn't have any ground breaking algorithms, and probably has a high price tag simply because they need to cover the development costs with a relatively small number of sales.
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