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Audioholics Subwoofer Measurement Data Compilation & Report P2

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Tab 4: Bassaholic Room Size

Tab#4 provides our Room Size rating for the subwoofers tested based on their CEA-2010 or reverse sinewave sweep output in according to our Room Size Rating protocol.  We have found the room size rating to really be a function of how much output the particular subwoofer produces below 30Hz because most subwoofers simply start running out of gas at this point.  This means whether the sub was tested via CEA-2010 or reverse sinewave sweep test method, we can still approximate a room size rating with a good confidence using either testing method. 

 Tab4: Bassaholic Rating

Tab 4: Bassaholic Room Size Rating

The top table shows results based on CEA-2010 testing conducted by Josh Ricci.  The bottom table shows results using reverse sinewave sweep testing by reviewers other than Josh Ricci.

As a refresher, here is the breakdown of our room size rating.  The subwoofer must be able to product the minimum SPL#s shown below when their test data is translated to 4 meters 1/8th space.

Room Size Rating

Dimensional Volume

SPL @ 4 meters

SPL @ 4 meters

 

(L x W x H)

25Hz

30Hz to 63 Hz

Small

< 1,500 ft^3

< 103dB

<109dB

Medium

1,500 ft^3 to 3,000ft^3

>/= 103dB

>/= 109dB

Large

3,000ft^3 to 5,000ft^3

>/= 109dB

>/= 115dB

Extreme

>5,000ft^3

>/= 117dB

>/= 123dB

If the subwoofer you are considering receives a “Large” room size rating, that means it will likely be able to hit full playback reference levels without being overdriven in a 3,000ft^3 to 5,000ft^3 room assuming you corner load the subwoofer.  The room size criteria and reference levels are listed at the top of the tabulated results for your reference when making product comparisons.

Tab #5: CEA2010 Max Sweep Comparison

The final tab of our subwoofer measurement spreadsheet exists to study how closely CEA-2010 and reverse sinewave sweep data track each other for each product under test.  The subs in this data table are all tested by both methods and by the same reviewer, namely Josh Ricci. 

Tab5: CEA Max Sweep Comparison 

Tab 5: CEA2010 Max Sweep Comparison

The table features data for all commercial subs tested under both measurement signal types (CEA2010 and reverse sinewave sweeps). Positive values indicate higher output levels were achieved using CEA-2010 test signals while negative values indicate less output was recorded using CEA2010 test signals. 

Conclusion

BassaholicWe hope this guide gives you a better understanding of our tabulated measurement results for subwoofers we review and test.  It is always advisable to spend the time and read the full review of each product while carefully observing our measurement commentary and subjective impressions of the product.  Looking at data alone doesn’t give you the full picture of product performance.  How the product actually performs in real world listening conditions, especially how it integrates into a home theater system is of paramount importance. 

Don’t be too caught up in the numbers game.  If sub A produces 2dB less output than sub B, don’t blindly chose sub A over sub B.  It’s quite possible sub B offers better overall performance and features that may be critical for your application.  Also remember that it takes 6dB of output difference for a subwoofer to play twice as loud.  So a 1-2dB difference between subs is often academic at best. 

For reference, here is a bass loudness chart:

  • +1 dB = 1.12X louder than baseline
  • +2 dB = 1.26X louder than baseline
  • +3 dB = 1.41X louder than baseline
  • +4 dB = 1.58X louder than baseline
  • +5 dB = 1.78X louder than baseline
  • +6 dB = 2X louder than baseline
  • +7 dB = 2.24X louder than baseline
  • +8 dB = 2.51X louder than baseline
  • +9 dB = 2.82X louder than baseline
  • +10 dB = 3.16X louder than baseline
  • +11 dB = 3.55X louder than baseline
  • +12 dB = 4X louder than baseline

If a particular subwoofer is too costly or too large for your application, consider a smaller (but well performing) alternative with future intent on adding a second subwoofer to your system.  We always recommend running multiple subs whenever possible for two reasons:

  • increased headroom (up to +3dB for every doubling of subs corner loaded but not collocated)
  • Smoother bass response across a wider listening area

The excel spreadsheet accompanying this report will routinely be updated and reposted in this article as well as our Powered Subwoofer Measurement Protocol so check back regularly to see our latest test results.  Good luck in your quest for Bassaholic perfection! 

 

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Recent Forum Posts:

Hokies83 posts on March 31, 2019 00:58
shadyJ, post: 1306675, member: 20472
I wouldn't say that SVS outperforms Hsu subs. They have different performance targets. They each have their strengths.
Especially at the $1000 mark, what dollar amount does it take to outperform the $1000 Hsu sub? The 4000 series ? PB-4000 is $1.900,
Ill take my Hsu VTF 15k mk2 for $1050 anyday and put that $900 elsewhere.
shadyJ posts on March 23, 2019 01:48
KallyCoda, post: 1306668, member: 87761
Really appreciate the hard work and sharing of data. Ordinarily, I'm not a data junkie because I find it suspect but your measurements look to be in a controlled environment. They also support my thinking that SVS subs outperform Hsu subs! Don't get offended anyone please. It's always a matter of ear preference. But nice to see some empirical data out there!
I wouldn't say that SVS outperforms Hsu subs. They have different performance targets. They each have their strengths.
KallyCoda posts on March 23, 2019 00:37
admin, post: 857429, member: 1
By now you've seen the numerous subwoofer reviews we've published using our new Powered Subwoofer Test and Room Size Rating protocol. Audioholics.com has invested a great deal of resources measuring and analyzing subwoofers over the last few years. As a result we have created the industry's most comprehensive testing procedure and database of tabulated measurement results. Our tests adhere to our strict testing methodology which is also compliant to the CEA-2010 Subwoofer Measurement Standard whenever practical. In this article, we will take you on a tour of our Excel Spreadsheet measurement results called “Audioholics CEA-2010 Subwoofer Measurement Data”. It is our hope that the reader can achieve a better understanding of what all the data means for a more informed purchasing decision by making objective apples-apples comparisons between various tested products.


Discuss “Audioholics Subwoofer Measurement Data Compilation & Report” here. Read the article.

NOTE: If you are having problems downloading the EXCEL spreadsheet in the main article, I attached it as a Zip File here. Also attached is a PDF version of this file for those that don't have Excel.

I will replace and update as more test data becomes available.
Really appreciate the hard work and sharing of data. Ordinarily, I'm not a data junkie because I find it suspect but your measurements look to be in a controlled environment. They also support my thinking that SVS subs outperform Hsu subs! Don't get offended anyone please. It's always a matter of ear preference. But nice to see some empirical data out there!
everettT posts on February 17, 2019 08:54
vancobra, post: 1298993, member: 87472
Hi gene…
What is your advice..
should I buy .. ONE SVS PB2000
OR
TOW POLK PSW 505
THANKS….
Go ahead and delete this post since you did the right thing and started a thread
vancobra posts on February 17, 2019 08:00
Hi gene…
What is your advice..
should I buy .. ONE SVS PB2000
OR
TOW POLK PSW 505
THANKS….
Post Reply