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RBH MC-4C Measurements and Analysis

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The graph below shows the frequency response of the RBH MC-4C HD on-axis (red), 15 (blue) and 30 (purple) degrees off-axis horizontally, 15 degrees off-axis above (green) and below (yellow) the tweeter, and an average of these responses (black) at 1 meter, smoothed 1/12 of an octave, and offset for easier viewing.  All measurements were taken in room, so keep in mind that the low-frequency response is affected by room modes.

RBH MC-4C Listening Window

RBH MC-4C In-room Frequency Response (1 meter measurements, 1/12th octave smoothed)

on-axis (red); 15 (blue) and 30 (purple) degrees off-axis horizontally, 15 degrees off-axis above (green) and below (yellow) the tweeter, and an average of these responses (black)

The RBH MC-4C produced exhibited an exceptionally flat frequency response.

Notice the exceptionally flat response from 1k upward.  The accuracy of these speakers, even off-axis, is really impressive.  The speakers were placed on 24” stands, so the distance between the woofer/mic and the floor is roughly the same as the wavelength of the 300-400hz suck-out, thus, this measurement anomaly due to floor bounce should be ignored.  The only issue is the step drop in the last half-octave at 30 degrees or more.  For those of us that can still hear 15kHz and above (watch your volume levels and get a nice set of earplugs people), this might translate into a little less “air” in the high frequencies throughout the room.  Compensate by using a moderate amount of toe-in.
 
Here is the average response (black) spliced at 300Hz with a near-field woofer (red) measurement for a more accurate picture of the bass response.

RBH MC-4C Avg and Nearfield

RBH MC-4C Listening Window Average (Black) and Wofer Near-field (Red)

All previous measurements were taken with the grill off, while I did the vast majority of my listening with the grill on.  In the graph below, you can see on-axis measurements with the grill on (blue) and off (red).

RBH MC-4C Grill

RBH MC-4C Grill On (Blue) and Off (Red)

 

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Recent Forum Posts:

nova posts on May 12, 2015 22:52
Too bad these are being phased out. I think they are a great little speaker. I did not think these were all that “bass shy”, though mine are the originals not the Mark II reviewed here. Not to say there is a lot of bass but crossed at 160 Hz? I've run mine full range with an Acurus A250 (okay I've abused mine) at very high volume and they never complained and sounded quite good. Was rather amused at the driver excursion and quality of upper mid-bass.

I typically run mine in a small (~12'x~14') room, crossover at 120 Hz and an RBH TS-10AP sub. At times I enjoy them more than my SE-1266's
KEW posts on May 07, 2015 22:18
Reorx, post: 1082844, member: 9134
It seems like it would be more headache then what it's worth to run these as a LCR.

I think that is a fair assessment. These speakers are so bass shy, I would only really consider them as satellites. I suppose you might pair them with a competent 8" sub to complete the bass in a 2 channel system… and then add a sub.
Reorx posts on May 07, 2015 18:01
That's what I thought you would say. I didn't want to put words into your mouth though. And I had not thought about the directionality of the mid-bass.

It seems like it would be more headache then what it's worth to run these as a LCR. if you need to purchase 2 subs to provide that mid-bass extension, your already taking up the floor space, plus adding cost. If you are using existing subs, then it might be a pain for the normal person to calibrate properly.

You might as well get larger bookshelf or tower speakers that already are capable. RBH MC-6C, or 661 series for example.

I really do like the fact that they are not rear ported. And I could see myself getting these little guys for surround, surround rears, wide, or height. Maybe suspending them from the ceiling for an Atmos setup. o_O

Thanks for the review.
gene posts on May 07, 2015 14:10
Reorx, post: 1082818, member: 9134
Quote: “You might also consider purchasing two small subs, placing them in close proximity to the left and right speakers, and running them in stereo. This would give you full-frequency range response in a compact package while accommodating a higher crossover point, smoothing out low frequency response, and giving you the best stereo separation at high-bass frequencies.”

Question: Did something change recently?

Before the recommendations were to put dual sub's in opposing symmetrical sides of the room. To properly balance the bass. As well as running the dual subs in mono.

Thanks.

Reorx
As Kew stated I recommend placing dual subs on the front wall in close proximity to the front speakers if you're using satellite speakers that require a higher than 80Hz crossover setting to get a good mid bass integration. This works very well especially with 1/4L and 3/4L placement.
KEW posts on May 07, 2015 13:59
Reorx, post: 1082818, member: 9134
Quote: “You might also consider purchasing two small subs, placing them in close proximity to the left and right speakers, and running them in stereo. This would give you full-frequency range response in a compact package while accommodating a higher crossover point, smoothing out low frequency response, and giving you the best stereo separation at high-bass frequencies.”

Question: Did something change recently?

Before the recommendations were to put dual sub's in opposing symmetrical sides of the room. To properly balance the bass. As well as running the dual subs in mono.

Thanks.

Reorx

I think the idea is that since you would want to cross over these speakers at 150Hz or higher, you would be able to tell where the sound came from. Normally subs are crossed low enough that most of us can't locate it by sound.
So you are sacrificing optimal placement to prevent a greater sin - having the bass player behind you while the rest of the band is in front!
Crossing over so high puts the sub in the role normally played by a mid-woofer, and you want your mid-woofer near the tweeter.
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