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RBH MC-4C Conclusion

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Sometimes manufacturers skimp on their small speaker designs assuming that a customer who wants the best quality sound will always buy larger speakers, and those buying small speakers are looking to spend as little money as possible even at the expense of quality.  RBH recognizes that this is not always the case, and there is a large customer base that wants both high-quality sound, and a compact package.  The RBH MC-4C is the small speaker for customers who put a premium on appearance and want to make as few sonic compromises as possible.  The MC-4C offer great sound, especially when mated with a capable subwoofer, and stand out with polished finish details, and high-quality components.

 Despite the MC-4C is a small speaker, RBH did NOT skimp on its design.

The only downside to the speakers is the cost.  Sure, for $529/pair, you’re getting high-quality components, exceptional fit and finish, and notably accurate sound reproduction.  But, the small speaker category is getting crowded with low-cost options from well-regarded names including classics like the NHT SuperZero and newcomers like the SVS Prime Satellite.  RBH will need to rely on the MC-4C superior fit and finish to get in your room, and the quality of their sound reproduction to keep them there.

 RBH MC-4C Bookshelf Speaker Video Review


MC-4C Review
MSRP: $529/pair

RBH Sound
382 Marshall Way
Layton, Utah 84041
http://www.rbhsound.com
Toll-free: (800) 543-2205

The Score Card

The scoring below is based on each piece of equipment doing the duty it is designed for. The numbers are weighed heavily with respect to the individual cost of each unit, thus giving a rating roughly equal to:

Performance × Price Factor/Value = Rating

Audioholics.com note: The ratings indicated below are based on subjective listening and objective testing of the product in question. The rating scale is based on performance/value ratio. If you notice better performing products in future reviews that have lower numbers in certain areas, be aware that the value factor is most likely the culprit. Other Audioholics reviewers may rate products solely based on performance, and each reviewer has his/her own system for ratings.

Audioholics Rating Scale

  • StarStarStarStarStar — Excellent
  • StarStarStarStar — Very Good
  • StarStarStar — Good
  • StarStar — Fair
  • Star — Poor
MetricRating
Build QualityStarStarStarStarStar
AppearanceStarStarStarStarStar
Treble ExtensionStarStarStarStar
Treble SmoothnessStarStarStarStar
Midrange AccuracyStarStarStarStar
Bass ExtensionStarStarStar
Bass AccuracyStarStarStarStar
ImagingStarStarStarStar
SoundstageStarStarStarStar
Dynamic RangeStarStarStarStar
Fit and FinishStarStarStarStar
PerformanceStarStarStarStar
ValueStarStarStarhalf-star
About the author:
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Marshall is an Educator by trade, and currently lives in Oregon. He was lucky enough to grow up in a musical household, and though the AV equipment wasn't the greatest, it was always on. His dad introduced him to Queen, Paul Simon, and Sgt. Pepper's, and his mom played Lionel Richie and Disney Soundtracks. When Marshall was 14, his uncle passed down a pair of JBL towers and Marshall finally had his own system. Having enjoyed podcasting and video production over the past 10 years, Marshall is happy to be contributing at Audioholics.

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Recent Forum Posts:

nova posts on May 12, 2015 22:52
Too bad these are being phased out. I think they are a great little speaker. I did not think these were all that “bass shy”, though mine are the originals not the Mark II reviewed here. Not to say there is a lot of bass but crossed at 160 Hz? I've run mine full range with an Acurus A250 (okay I've abused mine) at very high volume and they never complained and sounded quite good. Was rather amused at the driver excursion and quality of upper mid-bass.

I typically run mine in a small (~12'x~14') room, crossover at 120 Hz and an RBH TS-10AP sub. At times I enjoy them more than my SE-1266's
KEW posts on May 07, 2015 22:18
Reorx, post: 1082844, member: 9134
It seems like it would be more headache then what it's worth to run these as a LCR.

I think that is a fair assessment. These speakers are so bass shy, I would only really consider them as satellites. I suppose you might pair them with a competent 8" sub to complete the bass in a 2 channel system… and then add a sub.
Reorx posts on May 07, 2015 18:01
That's what I thought you would say. I didn't want to put words into your mouth though. And I had not thought about the directionality of the mid-bass.

It seems like it would be more headache then what it's worth to run these as a LCR. if you need to purchase 2 subs to provide that mid-bass extension, your already taking up the floor space, plus adding cost. If you are using existing subs, then it might be a pain for the normal person to calibrate properly.

You might as well get larger bookshelf or tower speakers that already are capable. RBH MC-6C, or 661 series for example.

I really do like the fact that they are not rear ported. And I could see myself getting these little guys for surround, surround rears, wide, or height. Maybe suspending them from the ceiling for an Atmos setup. o_O

Thanks for the review.
gene posts on May 07, 2015 14:10
Reorx, post: 1082818, member: 9134
Quote: “You might also consider purchasing two small subs, placing them in close proximity to the left and right speakers, and running them in stereo. This would give you full-frequency range response in a compact package while accommodating a higher crossover point, smoothing out low frequency response, and giving you the best stereo separation at high-bass frequencies.”

Question: Did something change recently?

Before the recommendations were to put dual sub's in opposing symmetrical sides of the room. To properly balance the bass. As well as running the dual subs in mono.

Thanks.

Reorx
As Kew stated I recommend placing dual subs on the front wall in close proximity to the front speakers if you're using satellite speakers that require a higher than 80Hz crossover setting to get a good mid bass integration. This works very well especially with 1/4L and 3/4L placement.
KEW posts on May 07, 2015 13:59
Reorx, post: 1082818, member: 9134
Quote: “You might also consider purchasing two small subs, placing them in close proximity to the left and right speakers, and running them in stereo. This would give you full-frequency range response in a compact package while accommodating a higher crossover point, smoothing out low frequency response, and giving you the best stereo separation at high-bass frequencies.”

Question: Did something change recently?

Before the recommendations were to put dual sub's in opposing symmetrical sides of the room. To properly balance the bass. As well as running the dual subs in mono.

Thanks.

Reorx

I think the idea is that since you would want to cross over these speakers at 150Hz or higher, you would be able to tell where the sound came from. Normally subs are crossed low enough that most of us can't locate it by sound.
So you are sacrificing optimal placement to prevent a greater sin - having the bass player behind you while the rest of the band is in front!
Crossing over so high puts the sub in the role normally played by a mid-woofer, and you want your mid-woofer near the tweeter.
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