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YG Acoustics InVincible 21.2 6kwatt Subwoofer Costs $100k?!?

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YG Acoustics InVincible 21.2 Subwoofer

YG Acoustics InVincible 21.2 Subwoofer

Summary

  • Product Name: InVincible 21.2 Subwoofer
  • Manufacturer: YG Acoustics
  • Review Date: July 24, 2019 01:00
  • MSRP: $100,000
  • First Impression: Pretty Cool
  • Buy Now

  • Drivers: Dual 21” CNC machined aluminum cones
  • Frequency response: Truly full output (-0 dB), even anechoically, to below 20 Hz. Usable output extends below 15 Hz
  • Amplifier Power: Up to 6,000 watts RMS (requires a 230 Volt AC hookup, otherwise 3,000 watts)
  • Dimensions (H x W x D): 70 x 27 x 27 inches
  • Weight: 462 lbs

Executive Overview

What is the best bass you’ve ever heard? For me, two very different systems come to mind. The first is an utterly ridiculous two-channel system that I recently heard at a high-end dealer in Santa Monica, featuring Wilson Audio’s flagship WAMM Master Chronosonic loudspeakers ($685,000 per pair) and WAMM Master Subsonic subwoofers ($90,000 per pair), driven by a rack full of Dan D’Agostino’s gleaming copper-clad electronics. The source was the $400,000 TechDAS Air Force Zero turntable. Yes, this megabuck system was absurdly expensive, even by high-end standards, but the sound was memorable, to say the least. The focus was on lightning-fast transient speed and extreme clarity, all the way down to the lowest frequencies. There was a sense of effortlessness to the bass, which blended so seamlessly that the towering subs seemed to be doing nothing at all. The system did a remarkable job of recreating the acoustic space of Carnegie Hall on a track from Harry Belafonte’s 1959 live album. This experience was very different from that of my other pick for best-ever bass — a surround system comprising electronics and omnidirectional loudspeakers from Germany’s MBL, with supplemental bass provided by a pair of JL Audio Gotham v2 subwoofers ($16,500 each). The bass was, as JL Audio would put it, devastating. Aural memory may be less than perfect, but I definitely remember how this system felt. At a moment’s notice, these subs could have pulverized my entire skeleton to dust. There was a seemingly endless reserve of power and slam, and the low frequencies extended down to just above the core of the Earth. For me, the platonic ideal of bass would capture the best of both worlds. Is it possible to convey the WAMM Master Subsonic’s effortless speed and clarity while delivering the Gotham’s mind-blowing depth and power? That is precisely what YG Acoustics set out to achieve with the company’s enormous InVincible 21.2 subwoofer, which sells for a cool $100,000 each.

YG Acoustics has made some of the world’s best loudspeakers for 15 years now, but the InVinYG InVincible 21.2.jpgcible sub is unlike anything the Colorado-based company — or anyone, really — has ever produced. YG says the InVincible sub is:

the world’s first hyper-high-end sub-bass speaker,” created to be “a truly extreme solution, a no-holds-barred assault on everything deemed possible in the sub-bass realm.”

According to YG, many owners of the company’s flagship speakers wanted to add subwoofers to their systems, but found that doing so came with serious drawbacks. We’ve all heard systems in which the bass simply can’t keep up with the higher frequencies, and this problem can be even more apparent in highly resolving systems. In order to create a sub that could go toe-to-toe with the best speakers from YG and its high-end competitors (such as Wilson, Magico, and Rockport), YG’s designers began by developing a new 21-inch BilletCore driver, which is machined from a single, massive slab of aircraft-grade aluminum. After more than five hours of CNC machining, a 14.5-ounce cone is all that remains of the 66-pound slab from which it was delicately carved. The 21-inch driver is only 0.6mm (0.024 inches) thick, yet is reportedly far more rigid than any competing design. According to YG, the CNC-machined basket is “precisely assembled from 238 parts using lab-grade alignment and tolerances.”

6000 Thousand Watts? Great Scott!

Doc BrownThe InVincible 21.2 sub uses two of these huge drivers in a dual-opposing, push-push setup. Each driver sits in its own enclosure, and is tilted at an angle that YG says improves the ease of room-integration by approximating the dispersion of a front-firing driver, while delivering the vibration-cancelling benefits of a push-push setup. The drivers are powered by a custom, American-made class D amplifier that provides up to 6,000 watts RMS (iyou're going to need a custom wall outlet to deliver anywhere near that power). Like YG’s flagship Sonja loudspeakers, the InVincible sub uses a “box within a box” cabinet design to minimize vibration. The sealed cabinet is CNC-machined from solid aluminum billet, and stands 5’10” high. The cabinet also features a YG technology called Focused Elimination, which relies on precise, sophisticated geometries to eradicate standing waves with less loss (i.e. less friction) than traditional stuffing and damping methods.

According to YG, the result is “a quick reaction-time, freedom from boxiness, and a tight, punchy bass.”

 YG InVincible 21.1.jpgYG InVincible 21.1i.jpg

The InVincible sub uses an advanced DSP-based crossover, allowing it to blend with most high-end speakers in two-channel or surround sound setups. The DSP design was inspired by YG’s exclusive Dual Coherent technology, which ensures that the crossover is coherent in both the time and frequency domains. The user can select whatever crossover frequency works best, but the guesswork is eliminated for owners of YG speakers, thanks to pre-programmed settings for all current YG loudspeaker models, as well as for many legacy models. Like YG’s Sonja loudspeakers, the InVincible sub is modular, and is therefore available in two single-driver, single-enclosure configurations, either of which can be upgraded to the larger, dual-driver flagship design described above. The InVincible 21.1 is the upward-firing single-driver configuration; it is basically the bottom half of the dual-driver InVincible 21.2 configuration. The 21.1i is a downward-firing version of the single-driver configuration. It is designed for high-traffic installations where the user does not feel comfortable leaving the driver exposed. Because the 21.1i has a flat top surface, it can also double as a stand for the center channel speaker in a surround application. Both single-driver configurations sell for $55,000 each.

Will YG’s InVincible sub succeed in setting a new standard in the world of ultra-high-end bass performance? What is the best bass you’ve heard in an audio system? Share your thoughts in the related forum thread below.

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About the author:

Jacob is a music-lover and audiophile who enjoys convincing his friends to buy audio gear that they can't afford. He's also a freelance writer and editor based in Los Angeles.

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Recent Forum Posts:

killdozzer posts on August 03, 2019 06:14
Not trying to get anyone angry, but taking a serious step back from this topic… I don't think this is Audioholics grade. 400k TT (I know, it was another system)??? It is not “absurdly expensive ” it crossed that line ages ago in the direction of really stupid.
William Lemmerhirt posts on July 26, 2019 19:12
BoredSysAdmin, post: 1328339, member: 28046
The difference is TomV is quite active on this forum (or least used to) and his posting/marketing style could be described in what I think is quite aggressive/pushy (at past, the subs comparisons were fuzzied to point of borderline dishonest). Dr. SHU, on the other hand, does very little to no marketing at all and let his products speak for themselves. You'd be the judge.
Idk. I’ve seen Tom recommend subs from other builders before too. So while his tactics may be “questionable” sometimes, I can say all of my personal interactions with him have been positive. mad you said though, I have seen some measurements/comparisons that seemed to be…..slanted maybe? Anyway, hopefully we end up with third party(data-bass) data to read. FWIW, their new subs do seem pretty compelling.
its phillip posts on July 25, 2019 15:22
jeffca, post: 1328528, member: 48611
Wow, do you have a bunch of things wrong:

• Six 8“ woofers give the response of one 8” woofer, but with 6 times the excursion, 6 times the power handling, 6 times the heat dissipation and 1/6 the distortion and non-linearities one 8“ woofer doing the same work. These are approximations, but they work out to be fairly true.
• The cumulative weight of the voice coils, formers cones and air load is a non factor… they act independently for each driver, not as a summed group
• 8” subs tend to have a moving mass including air load around 3 oz. That is substantially less than this sub so if you are trying to tell me that six, well-designed 8“ subs will be as slow as the best 18” driver, sorry, you are wrong
• Once you start getting upwards of 18 inches for a sub driver, the size of the magnet being able to control the driver has already started diminishing. That's just a fact. Sorry.
• Moving mass is never advantageous when you are designing a loudspeaker driver. It is a necessary evil that can be utilized when engineering a real world design, but it is not ideal.
• Six, well designed, 8“ sub drivers will eviscerate any 18” sub driver any day of the week
• The lowest note on most instruments is a low B which is about 31Hz. You can go even lower, a super low E is 20.5Hz, but nothing but a pipe organ or synth can hit that (OK, John Paul Jones' crazy bass string things can do that, but, hey, those are not normal as is he… in the greatest way!)

Bottom line is this:
• A phalanx of small subs is better than one huge sub any day
• The reason there aren't more subs like Paradigm's is the expense, plain and simple

Bass myths: https://data-bass.com/#articles/5cbf5e7357f7140004d6d0ec

Paradigm Signature S2 review/measurements: https://data-bass.com/#/systems/5b11d85da201f10004e39d70?_k=y923ea
Funk Audio FW21.0 review/measurements: https://data-bass.com/#/systems/5c11783c4f4746000425b908?_k=yjmat9
JTR Captivator S2 review/measurements: https://data-bass.com/#/systems/5c1d4e6c45bca300046104df?_k=n0o5f2

I agree that multiple small subs can potentially perform better than one huge sub however, but that of course depends on the subs in question
shadyJ posts on July 25, 2019 15:20
jeffca, post: 1328528, member: 48611
Wow, do you have a bunch of things wrong:

• Six 8“ woofers give the response of one 8” woofer, but with 6 times the excursion, 6 times the power handling, 6 times the heat dissipation and 1/6 the distortion and non-linearities one 8“ woofer doing the same work. These are approximations, but they work out to be fairly true.
• The cumulative weight of the voice coils, formers cones and air load is a non factor… they act independently for each driver, not as a summed group
• 8” subs tend to have a moving mass including air load around 3 oz. That is substantially less than this sub so if you are trying to tell me that six, well-designed 8“ subs will be as slow as the best 18” driver, sorry, you are wrong
• Once you start getting upwards of 18 inches for a sub driver, the size of the magnet being able to control the driver has already started diminishing. That's just a fact. Sorry.
• Moving mass is never advantageous when you are designing a loudspeaker driver. It is a necessary evil that can be utilized when engineering a real world design, but it is not ideal.
• Six, well designed, 8“ sub drivers will eviscerate any 18” sub driver any day of the week
• The lowest note on most instruments is a low B which is about 31Hz. You can go even lower, a super low E is 20.5Hz, but nothing but a pipe organ or synth can hit that (OK, John Paul Jones' crazy bass string things can do that, but, hey, those are not normal as is he… in the greatest way!)

Bottom line is this:
• A phalanx of small subs is better than one huge sub any day
• The reason there aren't more subs like Paradigm's is the expense, plain and simple
8“ is just not a great size for subwoofer drivers. The problem is there is not much room for suspension in such a tight basket, so the Fs of 8” drivers tends to be high, and they tend to be very inefficient outside of midbass frequencies. As far as the loss of ability of a magnet to control an 18“, I don't know where you are getting that. There are tons of examples of well-controlled 18” drivers and even larger cone diameters. I don't disagree with the idea that a bunch of small subs can make for a better system than a single large sub, only for the reason that they can achieve a flatter response by smoothing out room modes. There is definitely no technical advantage that an 8" driver has over larger cone diameters in subwoofer band frequencies. And I don't think that it is correct that there aren't more subs like Paradigms because of expense. I think the real reason is because it is easier and better to just have one large driver in an enclosure than six small ones.
Pogre posts on July 25, 2019 14:49
^ Who left that strawman up there..?
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