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Hitachi CP-A100 Short-throw Projector

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Hitachis Short Throw Projector

Hitachi's Short Throw Projector

Summary

  • Product Name: CP-A100 Short-Throw Projector
  • Manufacturer: Hitachi
  • Review Date: January 14, 2008 10:34
  • MSRP: $TBD
  • First Impression: Pretty Cool
Aspect Ratio: 4:3 (Native)
Brightness (ANSI): 1500 Lumens (Normal), 2500 Lumens (Bright)
Contrast Ratio: 500:1
Display Type: 3LCD
Resolution (Native / Max): XGA (1024 x 768), UXGA (1600 x 1200)
Video Compatibility: NTSC, PAL, SECAM, PAL-M, PAL-N, NTSC 4.43, SDTV (525i, 480i, 525p, 480p, 625i, 576i), HDTV (750p, 720p, 1125i)
Number of Colors: 16.7 Million Colors

Inputs:

2 x Mini D-Sub 15pin
1 x RCA Video
1 x S-Video
1 x Component
2 x Stereo Mini Jack
1 x RCA Audio

Outputs

1 x Mini D-Sub 15pin
1 x Stereo Mini Jack

Control

1 x RJ-45
1 x RS-232
1 x USB Type B

Power Supply: 100 ~ 120 / 220 ~ 240 V / 50 ~ 60 Hz
Approvals: UL, C-UL, FCC Class B, CE
Lamp Type: 220W

Projection Distance: 1.4ft. ~ 3.2ft. (0.43m ~ 0.98m)
Projection Mode: Front
Projection Screen Size (Diagonal): 60in. ~ 100in. (152.4cm ~ 254cm)
Vertical Keystone Correction: +/- 5 Degrees
Menu Languages: 17 Languages

Features:
Freeze
Magnifying
Blank
Auto Adjustment
Search

Picture Adjustment:
Digital Keystone
Accessories:
Remote Control
Power Cord
User Manual
Computer Cable
Soft Case
Security Label
Cable Cover
Stand


Executive Overview

Hitachi Short Throw Projector EngineHitachi America unveiled the CP-A100 3LCD projector, a unique product that offered a dramatically short throw distance at a remarkably steep angle. This type of projector, geared primarily towards the commercial markets, eliminates the problem of presenters obstructing the projected image by standing in front of the screen. Additionally, the CP-A100 offers networking capability, allowing multiple projectors to be controlled and monitored from a single location. It also makes for a very impressive screenwall effect when multiple units are used from an overhand along a stretch of wall.

The CP-A100 boasts an extremely short throw distance: at 1.6 feet you can project a 60 inch image. This not only prevents image obstruction, but also means there are no shadows interfering with the image and no light in the presenter's face. The versatile CP-A100 can be placed vertically as well as horizontally, as well as inverted for ceiling mount applications, making positioning of the projector more convenient.

Adding to the user's convenience is the network connectivity of the CP-A100, which allows for simultaneous monitoring and control of several projectors from a remote location. This is particularly beneficial in schools and large corporate environments, where projectors are located throughout a facility and the monitoring of each projector is a time-consuming ordeal. With the benefits of networking technology, a technician can monitor details such as lamp life for each projector from his/her computer. Additionally, the CP-A100's performance stands alone among competitive models. It offers a brightness of 2,500 ANSI lumens, XGA resolution and a 500:1 contrast ratio.

The CP-A100 addresses the issue of security with functions such as multilevel PIN locks, a security bar and a Kensington slot. Moreover, the CP-A100 appears easy to use, featuring advanced connectivity and proprietary Hitachi functions including My Buttons, Input Source Naming and My Text. The CP-A100's E-Shot feature allows users to transfer up to four still images from a computer to the projector.

Easy maintenance is another attractive function of the CP-A100, as its lamp door is on top of the model, and the filter is located on the back, allowing for easy access. The CP-A100 offers additional versatility with its Whiteboard, Blackboard or Day Time Modes.

This product caught our eye and is a real no-brainer for those looking for a very impressive business-level solution that avoids the typical issues of glaring presentation products and shadow casting. I wish we could announce pricing and availability, but Hitachi was mum for now.

For more information about Hitachi's activities at the 2008 International CES, please visit http://av.hitachi.com/

About the author:
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Clint Deboer was terminated from Audioholics for misconduct on April 4th, 2014. He no longer represents Audioholics in any fashion.

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Recent Forum Posts:

AVRat posts on January 20, 2008 14:20
I guess announcements on upgraded pre/pros was skimpy/non-existent since nothing was reported, eh?
The Chukker posts on January 16, 2008 00:28
Tom Andry, post: 358149
Scratch that - when I wrote that article, I was converting from Yen to $ and came to $1800. Turns out it will cost more like $2500 according to Sony.
Yikes. It would be interesting if someone used the average price points for LCD or Plasma tv's (from say 27“ to 60+”) and then applied that sliding scale model to OLED tv's to give a “rough” idea of what the larger panels would cost in comparison. I know this logic is inherently flawed but geez, $2500 for an 11" tv? pfffff.
Do you get the feeling these guys are just showing off for it's own sake?
Tom Andry posts on January 15, 2008 11:10
Scratch that - when I wrote that article, I was converting from Yen to $ and came to $1800. Turns out it will cost more like $2500 according to Sony. I'd love to see this tech mature but I have a feeling that no one is going to want to invest in it enough to get the infrastructure to the point were they can be produced cheaply. With the majority of the public rolling their eyes at me when I tell them that there is a difference between SD and HD, I can't believe that we're going to convince them that a high contrast ratio is reason enough to spend 5x on an OLED display.
Tom Andry posts on January 15, 2008 09:43
The Chukker, post: 357718
So what kind of price differential are we talking about here? Did Samsung actually have an MSRP for the 31" model? If mass production were to indeed start in 2010 of mid to large sized models, what price point is Samsung shooting for and what was the maximum size they were touting?

Sony just released their first 11" OLED at $1800
Toshiba isn't going to release any at all based on manufacturing costs
[read more]

Samsung didn't talk price (heck, they didn't have a price tag on a single item in their booth) but many times these tech showcases are just stuff they are exploring.
The Chukker posts on January 14, 2008 18:44
“there is ample evidence that OLED will never come down in price enough to be a serious contender against LCDs.”
So what kind of price differential are we talking about here? Did Samsung actually have an MSRP for the 31" model? If mass production were to indeed start in 2010 of mid to large sized models, what price point is Samsung shooting for and what was the maximum size they were touting?
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