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Optoma HD65 and HD71 Projectors

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Summary

  • Product Name: HD65 and HD71 Projectors
  • Manufacturer: Optoma
  • Review Date: January 09, 2008 04:41
  • MSRP: $999 & $1299
  • First Impression: Pretty Cool
  • Buy Now

HD65

  • Native 720p resolution with DLP® chipset by Texas Instruments
  • 1600 lumens with a 4000:1 contrast ratio (in ImageAI mode)
  • Latest light and color processing technologies for enhanced picture quality and contrast
  • Sleek form factor and lightweight at 4 pounds
  • Extensive connectivity options including HDMI v1.3, component, VGA, composite, s-video,+12v trigger and USB

HD71

  • Native 720p resolution with DLP chipset by Texas Instruments
  • 2400 lumens of brightness with a 4000:1 contrast ratio (in ImageAI mode)
  • Extensive inputs including HDMI v1.3, DVI, component, composite, s-video and VGA
  • The latest in multi-color processing technologies for enhance picture quality and contrast
  • Built-in 2-watt speaker

Executive Overview

Optoma, a leading manufacturer of award-winning digital projection and display devices, introduced two new 720p home theater projectors today at CES Las Vegas. The HD65 and the HD71 bring accessibility to high-definition, big-screen video content. The Optoma HD65 and HD71 combine amazing picture quality with extensive connectivity options for optimum performance.


The Optoma HD65 is the company’s 720p home theater projector that is priced at a remarkable starting point of $999. At 1600 lumens and the latest color processing technologies, the HD65 delivers subtle and incredible image quality and contrast. With a variety of connectivity options, including HDMI 1.3, the Optoma HD65 reproduces the realism that high-definition offers. With amazing picture quality and a high brightness level of 2400 lumens, the Optoma HD71 redefines vivid and vibrant. The HD71 expands the versatility of the home theater projector, with its multitude of connectivity options. The HD71 is an ideal crossover projector, perfect for both home and business uses. With the latest in multi-color processing capabilities, the HD71 delivers rich and deep textures with astonishing ease in non-light controlled environments.

The Optoma HD65 home theater projector will have an estimated street price of $999 and is currently available; the Optoma HD71 home theater projector will have an estimated street price of $1,299 and will be available in January 2008. Both projectors will be sold through authorized Optoma dealers and retailers.

For more information, visit www.optomausa.com.

About Optoma Technology, Inc.
Optoma Technology, Inc. is an award-winning developer of projection and digital display products for business and home. The company manufactures multimedia projectors for mobile users, fixed installations and home theaters, as well as HD displays. Optoma products combine superior image processing technologies with exceptional engineering and innovation to deliver images that are bright, crystal clear, and finely tuned for tone and color. Optoma products are sold through the company’s global network of pro AV dealers, major consumer electronics retailers and Internet resellers.

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About the author:

Tony is our resident expert for lifestyle and wireless products including soundbars. He does most of the reviews for wireless and streaming loudspeakers and often compares soundbars in round ups and helps us cover the trade shows.

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Recent Forum Posts:

Adam posts on March 29, 2014 16:42
Hi Dixie, and welcome to the forum!

To get audio from the TV to the Coby, the easiest way with that equipment is to use the “Headphone” jack on the TV, an inexpensive cable like this one to go from a 3.5mm headphone jack to stereo RCA plugs, and connect the RCA plugs to one of the Aux left/right inputs on the Coby.

To get video from the Coby to the TV, use the component video output on the back of the Coby (the green/blue/red cable that you mentioned) and connect that to the “COMPONENT” video input on the TV (which is right next to the headphone jack).

If I misunderstood and you want to send audio from the Coby to the TV, too, then you'd connect the left/right RCA audio outputs on the back of the Coby to the left/right audio inputs of the “COMPONENT” input on the TV - right next to where you connect the green/blue/red video cable.
Dixie_Darlin posts on March 29, 2014 15:58
markw, post: 1025570
that manual helps me but, sad to say, not you.

the most common way to connect audio is through the red/white RCA jacks. But, both the source and target unit need these.

Another method connect audio is through a digital audio connection (orange jack) , either a coaxial wire or a fibre optic cable (toslink). Again, both the source and target unit need these.

the sad thing in this case is that it appears that the TV has a digital coaxial audio output (orange jack) but the Coby has a red/white analog input for the CD which would work if the TV had the corrosponding output.

Thank you so much. I do understand these things and sometimes items just need to go, but again, my Dad things all those things last forever. Maybe he had something else he can hook up. Thanks again for all your help. Dixie
markw posts on March 27, 2014 07:55
that manual helps me but, sad to say, not you.

the most common way to connect audio is through the red/white RCA jacks. But, both the source and target unit need these.

Another method connect audio is through a digital audio connection (orange jack) , either a coaxial wire or a fibre optic cable (toslink). Again, both the source and target unit need these.

the sad thing in this case is that it appears that the TV has a digital coaxial audio output (orange jack) but the Coby has a red/white analog input for the CD which would work if the TV had the corrosponding output.
Dixie_Darlin posts on March 26, 2014 21:12
markw, post: 1025482
I can't find a manusl for your Coby unit so you'll have to do a little research on your own.

If it has a “coaxial digital input” you might be able to use it. If not, it doesn't look promising. One thing you give up when going for these budget units is flexibility.

Thank you very much. I know it's older. Someone gave it to my Dad and of course he always thinks it great and something better, when sometimes, it's not.

Here's a manual if that helps, the back is on page 6. http://dutchmen.com/image/data/documents/parts/Coby_Home_Theater_DVD_Player_DVD-925.pdf Thanks.
markw posts on March 26, 2014 17:09
I can't find a manusl for your Coby unit so you'll have to do a little research on your own.

If it has a “coaxial digital input” you might be able to use it. If not, it doesn't look promising. One thing you give up when going for these budget units is flexibility.
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