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Outlaw Audio RR2160 Stereo Receiver Preview

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Summary

  • Product Name: RR2160 Retro Receiver
  • Manufacturer: Outlaw Audio
  • Review Date: May 28, 2017 19:00
  • MSRP: $800
  • First Impression: Gotta Have It!
  • Buy Now
  • USB-B input for Hi-Res playback from compatible computers
  •  2 USB-A Inputs for connecting thumb-drives (rear USB-A for firmware updates)
  •  Ethernet Jack for network connection via CAT5/CAT6 or external wireless bridging device
  • DLNA - requires software, or app, download
  • 2 Digital Coax Inputs
  • 2 Digital Optical Inputs
  • Phono input for both moving magnet and moving coil cartridges
  • Processor/equalizer loop
  • Subwoofer output that includes selectable, analog bass management
  • Front panel "speaker equalization" selector adds a half-octave of bass boost at a choice of frequencies to improve performance with compact bookshelf speakers
  • A/B Speaker Output
  • IR In/Out jacks
  • Continuous Average Power:  110 watts per channel, 20 Hz - 20kHz,
  • Input Sensitivity/Impedance:  High Level: 200mV/47kohms MM Phono: 3.3mV/47kohms MC Phono: 0.6mV/47kohms
  • S/N Ratio: 96dB
  • Bass Management:  Adjustable 60/80/100/Bypass  High-Pass Slope 12 dB/octave (2nd order)  Low-Pass Slope 12 dB/octave (2nd order)
  • Tone Control:  Bass Center Frequency/Range 50Hz ± 10dB  Treble Center Frequency/Range 10KHz ± 10db
  • Dimensions:  (HxWxD) 5.75 x 17.1 x 15 in.
  • Weight      27 lbs

Executive Overview

Is “New Retro Receiver” an oxymoron? If so than Outlaw audio has one with their new RR2160 Stereo Receiver. It’s been eleven and a half years since Outlaw Audio released its classic two-channel RR2150 Retro Receiver. The new model preserves the analog signal purity of its predecessor, while adding DLNA and high-resolution capabilities via a multitude of digital audio inputs and a new, more powerful 110-watt stereo amplifier.

Since it was launched in 2005, the 2150 Retro Receiver has been one of our most popular products. Its pure analog signal path had some digital options. However, given today’s advances in high resolution audio and DLNA home connectivity technology, we felt it was time to update and improve features, while preserving the best of the 2150's stereo simplicity and pure musicality.

Peter Tribeman Outlaw Audio

The Outlaw Audio RR2160 uses a high-end Burr Brown 24-bit, 192 kHz DAC for playing high-resolution music files. DNLA-capable servers can connect over a home network when the RR2160 is wired via Ethernet or a wireless bridge, while front- and rear-panel USB-A jacks support flash drives, and a rear-panel USB-B jack supports music stored on computers.

RR2160interior.jpg

Inside View of RR2160 Stereo Receiver

As might be expected from a device with the name 'Retro,' the RR2160 has a low-noise switchable MC/MM phono input, and the quality FM Stereo/AM tuner also supports digital HD-Radio technology. In addition, the RR2160 also offers Internet Radio capabilities via the network connection. The RR2160 takes the best of the RR2150 and improves on the thick, multi-layered, aluminum front panel design, keeps the audiophile-quality phono preamp and offers configurable analog bass management. However, wrapped inside a familiar looking exterior is a product that is almost completely new

The Retro Receiver has four analog line level inputs, a record output, an external processor loop, and removable preamp-out/amp-in jumpers (though we doubt you'll need them) to allow use with an external power amplifier. A front-panel 3.5mm analog input accommodates the outputs of phones and tablets

RR2160front.jpg 

The Outlaw Audio RR2160's amplifier section is all new, with power conservatively FTC rated at 2 x 110 watts at 8 ohms, and 2 x 165 watts at 4 ohms, both channels driven. There are separate A and B speaker terminals (wired in parallel) for main and second-room options and there is a front-panel ¼-inch headphone jack with level control.  Based on past performance that we measured with the RR2150, we have no doubt the RR2160 will live up to and exceed expectations.

RR2160RP.jpg

The original RR2150 was one of the first stereo receivers to offer true bass management with a built-in electronic crossover for use with an optional subwoofer output. We did a full review of the RR2150 so be sure to check it out. The new RR2160 continues that feature with a three-position control for optimal integration between your speakers and up to two subwoofers. In addition, there is also a front-panel bass EQ switch which, when activated, is designed to provide smaller bookshelf speakers a boost of 6dB across a half-octave of bass.

Other useful features include two rear-panel 5-volt USB-A charging ports, two 12V-triggers, and IR input and output connections. Operating firmware is upgradable via the rear USB A jack. The aluminum bodied remote control is back-lighted and provides full access to all functions.

Basically, for $100 more than the RR2150 model, you get a top notch DAC and updated receiver based on a solid platform of good amplification which is hard to come by in this day and age in a sea of mediocre Atmos receivers.

Gene DellaSala, Audioholics

A Gem in a Sea of Mediocre Stereo Receivers?

We’re excited to see the release of a new and improved Retro Receiver from Outlaw Audio. The attention to detail extends to items other audio companies tend to skimp on: upgraded speaker terminals, IR In/Out jacks, separate listening paths for the main and record outputs, dual subwoofer pre-outputs, a dimmable two-line display and a heavy gauge, removable power cord, just to name a few. Most importantly, the RR2160 offers something very few stereo receivers do these days - a real amplification section that can authoritatively drive 4 ohm loads.  The RR2160 is a gem in a sea of mediocre stereo receivers. The Outlaw Audio RR2160 will be available from outlawaudio.com at the beginning of June with a price $799.

 

 

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About the author:

Tony is our resident expert for lifestyle and wireless products including soundbars. He does most of the reviews for wireless and streaming loudspeakers and often compares soundbars in round ups and helps us cover the trade shows.

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Recent Forum Posts:

brettski posts on February 28, 2019 17:35
davidscott, post: 1301763, member: 86172
Thanks Gene if I wasn't pretty happy with my HK3490 (which you reviewed a few years ago) this would be the 2 channel receiver that I would be interested in purchasing.

I'm currently rocking a HK3490 myself but it is starting to act up (A/B channel relays going bad). Trying to decide between a repair or a replacement. The RR2160 and the A-S801 are both at the top of my list. Great review here for the A-S801 but no detailed analysis on the RR2160 yet.
davidscott posts on February 28, 2019 17:27
gene, post: 1189596, member: 4348
It’s been eleven and a half years since Outlaw Audio released its classic two-channel RR2150 Stereo Retro Receiver. Their new RR2160 preserves the analog signal purity of its predecessor, while adding DLNA and high-resolution capabilities via a multitude of digital audio inputs and a new, more powerful 110-watt stereo amplifier. If you're looking for a new two-channel receiver for your Hi-Fi content than this might be the receiver for you. Is it a gem in a sea of mediocre stereo receivers? Read on to find out.



Read: Outlaw Audio RR2160 Stereo Receiver Preview
Thanks Gene if I wasn't pretty happy with my HK3490 (which you reviewed a few years ago) this would be the 2 channel receiver that I would be interested in purchasing.
brettski posts on February 28, 2019 13:47
Would love to see a more detailed breakdown for the performance of this model as was done for its predecessor, the RR2150, or its competitor the A-S801. Any chance there will be a ‘full review’ for the RR2160 in the near future?
j_garcia posts on June 13, 2018 11:57
I don't find the Emo amps to be analytical sounding, but I did always like the “analog” sound of the Outlaw gear like the older 1050 AVR.
dpl46 posts on June 13, 2018 11:43
I recently purchased the RR-2160 and love it. I've owned lots of audio gear over the years including Emotiva amps & preamps. And I prefer this Outlaw receiver to the Emo gear. To me it sounds a bit more musical and not as analytical as the Emo amps. And maybe its a function of gettng older, but I really like the simplicity of a receiver. Just one unit that does it all, and this one does it all very well.
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