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Emotiva UMC-200 A/V Processor Recommendations

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The UMC-EMO_blue.jpg200 offers benchmark performance in virtually every category.  For under $600 you get an A/V processor that supports all of the latest HD audio formats and sampling rates, a true analog audio path for purists, and fast HDMI switching.  If you’re looking for a product with all of the latest bells and whistles and networking features, the UMC-200 is not for you.  Your only option in this price range would be an A/V receiver.  However if you’re looking for a top notch analog preamp that just happens to double as a surround decoder and HDMI switcher, than the UMC-200 appears to be the best game in town at this price point.  I would suggest choosing a blu-ray player or display that offers networking options if you still would like to stream audio sources such as Pandora, Rhapsody, etc. 

Some have compared the new Outlaw 975 A/V processor as a direct competitor but they are two different products in reality.  The Outlaw offers legacy video support for analog video sources with analog up conversion while Emotiva simply abandoned all analog video in the UMC-200.  If analog video support is essential for your application, than the 975 is the only option for your consideration as far as a budget dedicated A/V processor goes.  However the Outlaw processor digitizes all of its analog audio inputs and it doesn’t have a 7.1 analog audio input.  This can be a deal breaker for analog purists.  The Outlaw 975 also lacks EQ other than basic tone controls and has no multi-zone support.   Further, because the Outlaw 975 has only one DSP, it offers limited functionality with a Dolby TrueHD bitstream or LPCM above a 96kHz sampling rate and above 48kHz sampling rates for DTS-HD via HDMI.  You will have to switch your Blu-ray player to LPCM  as a workaround if you go the Outlaw route.  This is NOT an issue for the Emotiva UMC-200 since it employs two Cirrus DSPs.  More horsepower and more MIPS are essential to fully support the highest sampling rates offered from HD audio formats while simultaneously supporting level control, digital delay and bass management. 

Conclusion

Emotiva UMC-200 A/V processor was pretty easy to set up and operate.  Not once did I have to reference a user manual which in my book is a sign of a well thought out OSD and functional layout.  It just worked— and worked very well indeed.  I tested the UMC-200 with Dolby TrueHD and DTS 96kHz/24 bit audio, and high-resolution PCM sources and everything decoded correctly.  HDMI switching was fast and glitch-free.

The real surprise of the UMC-200 was its fabulous analog preamp section.  Plugged directly into a high quality DAC, you’ve got yourself a preamp that will rival any mid priced A/V receiver and give most dedicated analog preamps a run for their money.  If you’re looking to break into the separates market at receiver level pricing, I can’t think of a better solution than the Emotiva UMC-200.  Paired with one of their high value amplifiers such as a UPA-700, you’ve got yourself a separates solution that supports all of the latest HD audio formats along with plenty of amplifier power to drive a wider array of loudspeakers most mid priced A/V receivers simply cannot do.  Highly recommended!

   Emotiva Audio Corporation

135 SE Parkway Court
Franklin, TN 37064

Phone: 615.790.6754   or   1.877.EMO.TECH (1.877.366.8324)
Fax: 615.791.6287
Office hours: Monday - Friday, 8am - 7pm (Central Standard Time)

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The scoring below is based on each piece of equipment doing the duty it is designed for. The numbers are weighed heavily with respect to the individual cost of each unit, thus giving a rating roughly equal to:

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Audioholics.com note: The ratings indicated below are based on subjective listening and objective testing of the product in question. The rating scale is based on performance/value ratio. If you notice better performing products in future reviews that have lower numbers in certain areas, be aware that the value factor is most likely the culprit. Other Audioholics reviewers may rate products solely based on performance, and each reviewer has his/her own system for ratings.

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Fit and FinishStarStarStarStarStar
Ergonomics & UsabilityStarStarStarStar
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Recent Forum Posts:

j_garcia posts on June 26, 2017 18:57
brad1138, post: 1194807, member: 37577
From the OP

“I found this to still be the case with the UMC-200. During manual calibration, the subwoofer level appeared to be set about 6-8 dB too hot when using the internal tone generator and my trusty analog SPL meter.”

I believe I have figured this out.

I recently switched from a pair of Velodyne ULD15s to a pair of SVS CS-Ultras. The Velodyne's had a built in crossover, originally set to 85Hz, but I had them modified to about 300Hz. The SVS' are just an Amp and 12“ driver, no Xover what so ever. The Velodyne's fit your 6-8 dB offset finding, I found them to be about 6 dB hot. The SVS' however were spot on. Using an external test disc, I confirmed the readings.

The problem is, the UMC-200 send a full range tone out to the subs, the test disc, only <~80Hz (what should be in the LFE channel). The test disc, with the <80Hz output, leveled the playing field. Both subs measured the same, but when then switching to the UMC-200 tone generator, with the full range output, the SVS' being ”full range“ (so to speak) had about 6dB more output than the Velo's, which were capped under about 300 Hz with internal xover. So, not knowing this issue, you would increase the Velo's output to reach the ”appropriate" dB, but they would be way to hot.

So it all seems to be related to the design of the sub.

Interesting. IMO, it does the full range tone because it is seeing where to blend the mains to the sub and EQ'ing the sub as well. I noticed the MC700 does something similar, but handles it better than the UMC did. It still comes in fairly hotter than I'd expect.
brad1138 posts on June 26, 2017 18:25
From the OP

“I found this to still be the case with the UMC-200. During manual calibration, the subwoofer level appeared to be set about 6-8 dB too hot when using the internal tone generator and my trusty analog SPL meter.”

I believe I have figured this out.

I recently switched from a pair of Velodyne ULD15s to a pair of SVS CS-Ultras. The Velodyne's had a built in crossover, originally set to 85Hz, but I had them modified to about 300Hz. The SVS' are just an Amp and 12“ driver, no Xover what so ever. The Velodyne's fit the OP's 6-8 dB offset finding, I found them to be about 6 dB hot. The SVS' however were spot on. Using an external test disc, I confirmed the readings.

The problem is, the UMC-200 send a full range tone out to the subs, the test disc, only <~80Hz (what should be in the LFE channel). The test disc, with the <80Hz output, leveled the playing field. Both subs measured the same, but when then switching to the UMC-200 tone generator, with the full range output, the SVS' being ”full range“ (so to speak) had about 6dB more output than the Velo's, which were capped under about 300 Hz with internal xover. So, not knowing this issue, you would increase the Velo's output to reach the ”appropriate" dB, but they would be way to hot.

So it all seems to be related to the design of the sub.
brad1138 posts on September 13, 2015 23:04
So, I missed it if we got a definitive answer, does enhanced bass send LFE channel to any speaker set as large or does it include bass from any speaker set as large large to the sub?
brad1138 posts on September 13, 2015 22:49
I believe so, I just got mine and noticed the same thing, I am going to change my mains to “Large” and see if it works all the way around.
swspiers posts on October 28, 2014 20:13
Steve81, post: 1057196, member: 61173
Ditto on the odd part. I was actually trying to see how my new speakers would do without subwoofer support so I switched over to direct mode and was thrown for a loop, particularly since I run with a higher than average XO point.

That is really weird! If the darn thing didn't sound so good, I would be all freaked out by the weird, strange things it does, and doesn't do.
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