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Emotiva UMC-200 A/V Processor Measurements and Analysis

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UMC-200 Analog Direct Freq.jpg

Emotiva UMC-200 Analog Preamp Frequency Response

I measured a ruler flat frequency response beyond the frequency response limits of my test gear (80kHz) in "Pure Direct" mode.  The UMC-200 preamplifier has a voltage gain of 14dB and was able to output 4Vrms at < 0.1% THD + N.   Basically the analog preamp is like a high quality jumper between your source and power amplifier.  The subwoofer output was about 0.5dB lower than the rest of the channels which is curious but not concerning. 

 UMC-200-analog-FFT.jpg

Emotiva UMC-200 Preamp FFT Distortion Analysis

At 2Vrms output, the UMC-200 had very little residual noise.  The noise floor was -120dB and the 2nd order harmonic was 101dB below the fundamental.  That’s a great measurement.

 UMC-200-analog-THD.jpg

Emotiva UMC-200 Distortion vs Frequency

Running a THD+N distortion sweep from 10Hz to 40kHz at 2Vrms output revealed a very clean preamplifier section.  This is textbook Amplifier Design 101.

UMC-1-Freq-192khz.jpg 

Emotiva UMC-200 Frequency Response with 192kHz Dolby TrueHD Test Signal

With all channels set to “small” crossed over at 80Hz, I measured a ruler flat response out to 48kHz.  Post processing such as bass management or PLIIx surround modes from Dolby/DTS limit sampling rates to 96KHz otherwise you would have seen ruler flat response out to ½ sampling rate which in this case would be 96kHz.

SNR

 UMC-200-aSNR.jpg

Emotiva UMC-200 Signal to Noise Ratio

The SNR of the preamp section was excellent measuring at > 102dB (a-wt) or about 90dB unweighted with 1 Vrms at the output being driven by a 200mV input from the Audio Precision APX585.  I wasn’t surprised by this measurement since the UMC-200 had very low, virtually undetectable background noise in all of my listening tests.  

Note: Disregard the SNR measurement for the Sub channel.  I forgot to turn off the measurement probe at the time of measurement.  no signal was present hence the measurement is invalid.

 Crosstalk

UMC-200 XTALK-HDMI.jpg

Emotiva UMC-200 Crosstalk Measurement

The Emotiva UMC-200 exhibited excellent channel to channel crosstalk performance whether being driven by a digital HDMI or analog audio source. With all channels acting as the noise source or disturber driven via the HDMI input, I measured each idle channel one at a time with all other channels being driven as the disturbers to determine the worst case channel to channel crosstalk.  At 1kHz the UMC-200 yielded about -100dB and -70dB @ 20kHz for its noisiest surround channel.  I consider anything less than -40dB @ 10kHz acceptable so the UMC-200 met that minimum requirement with >40dB to spare! 

 

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Recent Forum Posts:

j_garcia posts on June 26, 2017 18:57
brad1138, post: 1194807, member: 37577
From the OP

“I found this to still be the case with the UMC-200. During manual calibration, the subwoofer level appeared to be set about 6-8 dB too hot when using the internal tone generator and my trusty analog SPL meter.”

I believe I have figured this out.

I recently switched from a pair of Velodyne ULD15s to a pair of SVS CS-Ultras. The Velodyne's had a built in crossover, originally set to 85Hz, but I had them modified to about 300Hz. The SVS' are just an Amp and 12“ driver, no Xover what so ever. The Velodyne's fit your 6-8 dB offset finding, I found them to be about 6 dB hot. The SVS' however were spot on. Using an external test disc, I confirmed the readings.

The problem is, the UMC-200 send a full range tone out to the subs, the test disc, only <~80Hz (what should be in the LFE channel). The test disc, with the <80Hz output, leveled the playing field. Both subs measured the same, but when then switching to the UMC-200 tone generator, with the full range output, the SVS' being ”full range“ (so to speak) had about 6dB more output than the Velo's, which were capped under about 300 Hz with internal xover. So, not knowing this issue, you would increase the Velo's output to reach the ”appropriate" dB, but they would be way to hot.

So it all seems to be related to the design of the sub.

Interesting. IMO, it does the full range tone because it is seeing where to blend the mains to the sub and EQ'ing the sub as well. I noticed the MC700 does something similar, but handles it better than the UMC did. It still comes in fairly hotter than I'd expect.
brad1138 posts on June 26, 2017 18:25
From the OP

“I found this to still be the case with the UMC-200. During manual calibration, the subwoofer level appeared to be set about 6-8 dB too hot when using the internal tone generator and my trusty analog SPL meter.”

I believe I have figured this out.

I recently switched from a pair of Velodyne ULD15s to a pair of SVS CS-Ultras. The Velodyne's had a built in crossover, originally set to 85Hz, but I had them modified to about 300Hz. The SVS' are just an Amp and 12“ driver, no Xover what so ever. The Velodyne's fit the OP's 6-8 dB offset finding, I found them to be about 6 dB hot. The SVS' however were spot on. Using an external test disc, I confirmed the readings.

The problem is, the UMC-200 send a full range tone out to the subs, the test disc, only <~80Hz (what should be in the LFE channel). The test disc, with the <80Hz output, leveled the playing field. Both subs measured the same, but when then switching to the UMC-200 tone generator, with the full range output, the SVS' being ”full range“ (so to speak) had about 6dB more output than the Velo's, which were capped under about 300 Hz with internal xover. So, not knowing this issue, you would increase the Velo's output to reach the ”appropriate" dB, but they would be way to hot.

So it all seems to be related to the design of the sub.
brad1138 posts on September 13, 2015 23:04
So, I missed it if we got a definitive answer, does enhanced bass send LFE channel to any speaker set as large or does it include bass from any speaker set as large large to the sub?
brad1138 posts on September 13, 2015 22:49
I believe so, I just got mine and noticed the same thing, I am going to change my mains to “Large” and see if it works all the way around.
swspiers posts on October 28, 2014 20:13
Steve81, post: 1057196, member: 61173
Ditto on the odd part. I was actually trying to see how my new speakers would do without subwoofer support so I switched over to direct mode and was thrown for a loop, particularly since I run with a higher than average XO point.

That is really weird! If the darn thing didn't sound so good, I would be all freaked out by the weird, strange things it does, and doesn't do.
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