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Emotiva UMC-200 A/V Processor Listening Tests

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SACD: GrGrover.jpgover Washington JR – Prime Cuts

This SACD is a sonic masterpiece and a must have in your collection if you’re serious about sound and a jazz aficionado like myself. Track #1 “Take Five” has a lot of stuff going on at once, including a deeply rich bass track. Grover’s saxophone came through with excellent clarity while the percussive effects popped out into a very three dimensional landscape. When directly comparing the HDMI digital input to the analog connections using the 7.1 analog bypass, I did prefer the analog.  The Oppo BDP-105 DAC portrayed greater clarity than the internal UMC-200 DAC’s.  This wasn’t surprising considering the BDP-105 costs 2X the UMC-200 and utilizes some of the very best DAC’s in the industry (ESS Sabre 32 bit).  Don’t get me wrong, the UMC-200 sounded just fine via HDMI but in analog bypass, it was just magical.  I was hearing all of the great detail of the recording like I was listening on a high dollar separates rig.  Track #6 “Summer Nights” bore a similar resemblance to “Pyramid” from another great album called Close Up by David Sanborn. I loved the ping pong effect of the percussion instruments between the speakers. The Emotiva combo was driving the Pioneer speaker system with an ease and fidelity that defies the asking price of this setup.  You could hear the triangles slowly decay instead of just sharply fading away. Very nice.

AIX.jpg   avengers.jpg
      

Blu-ray: AIX Records Audio Calibration Disc

If you’ve never heard an AIX recording, you’re truly missing out.  Although most of the music is a bit obscure or not mainstream, the artists are generally good and the fidelity is unbeatable.  The UMC-200 delivered excellent clarity in Track #5, “Primavera”.  The flutes were reproduced with realism.  The vocals were a bit honky at loud listening levels but this was a limitation of the Pioneer center channel, NOT the Emotiva gear.  Bass was well extended despite the modest driver compliment of the Pioneer speaker system.  Channel separation was great and the noise floor was dead silent at all listening levels.  

Blu-ray: Avengers

This was the ultimate popcorn flick of 2012 and I’m a proud owner of it on Blu-ray.  The DTS HD soundtrack is rockin’ on this disc and it’s sure to test the limits of even the very best home theater systems.  The UMC-200 was able to place me into the middle of the battleground of the opening scene of Avengers when Loki stole back the Tesseract causing the secret S.H.I.E.L.D. installation to implode. The little Pioneer sub was unable to handle the bass dynamics of this scene so I switched over to one of my Velodyne DD-15+ subs and presto, I was engulfed into the experience. 

 

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Recent Forum Posts:

j_garcia posts on June 26, 2017 18:57
brad1138, post: 1194807, member: 37577
From the OP

“I found this to still be the case with the UMC-200. During manual calibration, the subwoofer level appeared to be set about 6-8 dB too hot when using the internal tone generator and my trusty analog SPL meter.”

I believe I have figured this out.

I recently switched from a pair of Velodyne ULD15s to a pair of SVS CS-Ultras. The Velodyne's had a built in crossover, originally set to 85Hz, but I had them modified to about 300Hz. The SVS' are just an Amp and 12“ driver, no Xover what so ever. The Velodyne's fit your 6-8 dB offset finding, I found them to be about 6 dB hot. The SVS' however were spot on. Using an external test disc, I confirmed the readings.

The problem is, the UMC-200 send a full range tone out to the subs, the test disc, only <~80Hz (what should be in the LFE channel). The test disc, with the <80Hz output, leveled the playing field. Both subs measured the same, but when then switching to the UMC-200 tone generator, with the full range output, the SVS' being ”full range“ (so to speak) had about 6dB more output than the Velo's, which were capped under about 300 Hz with internal xover. So, not knowing this issue, you would increase the Velo's output to reach the ”appropriate" dB, but they would be way to hot.

So it all seems to be related to the design of the sub.

Interesting. IMO, it does the full range tone because it is seeing where to blend the mains to the sub and EQ'ing the sub as well. I noticed the MC700 does something similar, but handles it better than the UMC did. It still comes in fairly hotter than I'd expect.
brad1138 posts on June 26, 2017 18:25
From the OP

“I found this to still be the case with the UMC-200. During manual calibration, the subwoofer level appeared to be set about 6-8 dB too hot when using the internal tone generator and my trusty analog SPL meter.”

I believe I have figured this out.

I recently switched from a pair of Velodyne ULD15s to a pair of SVS CS-Ultras. The Velodyne's had a built in crossover, originally set to 85Hz, but I had them modified to about 300Hz. The SVS' are just an Amp and 12“ driver, no Xover what so ever. The Velodyne's fit the OP's 6-8 dB offset finding, I found them to be about 6 dB hot. The SVS' however were spot on. Using an external test disc, I confirmed the readings.

The problem is, the UMC-200 send a full range tone out to the subs, the test disc, only <~80Hz (what should be in the LFE channel). The test disc, with the <80Hz output, leveled the playing field. Both subs measured the same, but when then switching to the UMC-200 tone generator, with the full range output, the SVS' being ”full range“ (so to speak) had about 6dB more output than the Velo's, which were capped under about 300 Hz with internal xover. So, not knowing this issue, you would increase the Velo's output to reach the ”appropriate" dB, but they would be way to hot.

So it all seems to be related to the design of the sub.
brad1138 posts on September 13, 2015 23:04
So, I missed it if we got a definitive answer, does enhanced bass send LFE channel to any speaker set as large or does it include bass from any speaker set as large large to the sub?
brad1138 posts on September 13, 2015 22:49
I believe so, I just got mine and noticed the same thing, I am going to change my mains to “Large” and see if it works all the way around.
swspiers posts on October 28, 2014 20:13
Steve81, post: 1057196, member: 61173
Ditto on the odd part. I was actually trying to see how my new speakers would do without subwoofer support so I switched over to direct mode and was thrown for a loop, particularly since I run with a higher than average XO point.

That is really weird! If the darn thing didn't sound so good, I would be all freaked out by the weird, strange things it does, and doesn't do.
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