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Emotiva UMC-200 AV Preamp / Processor Review

by January 03, 2013
  • Product Name: UMC-200 A/V Processor
  • Manufacturer: Emotiva
  • Performance Rating: StarStarStarStar
  • Value Rating: StarStarStarStarStar
  • Review Date: January 03, 2013 10:30
  • MSRP: $ 599
  • Buy Now
  • 4 HDMI Inputs all inputs HDMI 1.4 compliant, with 3D and CEC support
  • 1 HDMI Output HDMI 1.4 compliant, with ARC support
  • Analog Inputs: 4 stereo pairs and one 7.1 channel unbalanced;direct
  • Digital Inputs: S/PDIF, Coax, and 2 Toslink Optical
  • USB Input: Accepts Emotiva Bluetooth dongle only
  • Analog Outputs: 1 7.1 channel (unbalanced), 1 subwoofer (balanced), 1 stereo pair (unbalanced), and 2 stereo pairs (Zone 2 and Zone 3).
  • Antenna Inputs: 1 AM and 1 FM
  • 1 Trigger Input / 2 Trigger Outputs
  • 1 IR Input / 1 IR Output
  • Remote Control Full function infrared remote control with CEC sub panel
  • Display (on-screen) Full color OSD over live video
  • Display (front panel) Two line alphanumeric High visibility blue VFD (dimmable)
  • Size: unboxed: 17” W x 14” D x 3-1/4” H boxed: 21” W x 18” D x 7.5” H
  • Weight: 10 lbs (16 lbs boxed)

Pros

  • Decodes all of the latest HD audio formats flawlessly
  • Fabulous analog preamp section
  • Easy to setup and use
  • Firmware updatable via USB
  • Superb value

Cons

  • Lacks networking features found on A/V receivers
  • No legacy video support

 

Emotiva UMC-200 Introduction

Emo-bag.jpgEmotiva has been releasing a slew of new products every year either as entirely new platforms or refreshes to prior successful generations of products, most notably their power amplifies.   Emotiva fans have been awaiting the arrival of the new UMC-200 A/V processor.   The Emotiva UMC-200 is a 7.1 channel A/V processor with four HDMI inputs and one output with ARC (Audio Return Channel). It has two coaxial and two optical digital audio inputs and four pairs of RCA style analogue audio inputs. It has RCA style output connectors for your external amplifier for all 7.1 channels plus an additional XLR output for your subwoofer.

This highly anticipated product was designed to cosmetically match their Ultra series power amplifiers.  The Ultra series from Emotiva enables consumers to get into a separates solution at the price range of a middle of the lineup A/V receiver.  This review pairs the UMC-200 ($599) and the UPA-500 ($399) five-channel power amplifier for a combo squeezing in below the magic $1k price point.  Take a tour with us in this review to better understand the features and level of performance you can expect from the brand that has built such a solid reputation for performance, customer support and reliability for nearly a decade. 

Unpacking

The Emotiva UMC-200 comes in small compact box with foam inserts.  When I opened the box, i felt like I was unpacking an Oppo since the UMC-200 was enclosed in a bag very similar to what Oppo uses for their products. This was a very nice touch.  In the box was the supplied detachable power cord, calibration mic, FM antenna and AM loop antenna.  No user manual was located in my review sample but Emotiva makes their user manual readily available online for downloading.

About the author:

Gene manages this organization, establishes relations with manufacturers and keeps Audioholics a well oiled machine. His goal is to educate about home theater and develop more standards in the industry to eliminate consumer confusion clouded by industry snake oil.

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Recent Forum Posts:

j_garcia posts on June 26, 2017 18:57
brad1138, post: 1194807, member: 37577
From the OP

“I found this to still be the case with the UMC-200. During manual calibration, the subwoofer level appeared to be set about 6-8 dB too hot when using the internal tone generator and my trusty analog SPL meter.”

I believe I have figured this out.

I recently switched from a pair of Velodyne ULD15s to a pair of SVS CS-Ultras. The Velodyne's had a built in crossover, originally set to 85Hz, but I had them modified to about 300Hz. The SVS' are just an Amp and 12“ driver, no Xover what so ever. The Velodyne's fit your 6-8 dB offset finding, I found them to be about 6 dB hot. The SVS' however were spot on. Using an external test disc, I confirmed the readings.

The problem is, the UMC-200 send a full range tone out to the subs, the test disc, only <~80Hz (what should be in the LFE channel). The test disc, with the <80Hz output, leveled the playing field. Both subs measured the same, but when then switching to the UMC-200 tone generator, with the full range output, the SVS' being ”full range“ (so to speak) had about 6dB more output than the Velo's, which were capped under about 300 Hz with internal xover. So, not knowing this issue, you would increase the Velo's output to reach the ”appropriate" dB, but they would be way to hot.

So it all seems to be related to the design of the sub.

Interesting. IMO, it does the full range tone because it is seeing where to blend the mains to the sub and EQ'ing the sub as well. I noticed the MC700 does something similar, but handles it better than the UMC did. It still comes in fairly hotter than I'd expect.
brad1138 posts on June 26, 2017 18:25
From the OP

“I found this to still be the case with the UMC-200. During manual calibration, the subwoofer level appeared to be set about 6-8 dB too hot when using the internal tone generator and my trusty analog SPL meter.”

I believe I have figured this out.

I recently switched from a pair of Velodyne ULD15s to a pair of SVS CS-Ultras. The Velodyne's had a built in crossover, originally set to 85Hz, but I had them modified to about 300Hz. The SVS' are just an Amp and 12“ driver, no Xover what so ever. The Velodyne's fit the OP's 6-8 dB offset finding, I found them to be about 6 dB hot. The SVS' however were spot on. Using an external test disc, I confirmed the readings.

The problem is, the UMC-200 send a full range tone out to the subs, the test disc, only <~80Hz (what should be in the LFE channel). The test disc, with the <80Hz output, leveled the playing field. Both subs measured the same, but when then switching to the UMC-200 tone generator, with the full range output, the SVS' being ”full range“ (so to speak) had about 6dB more output than the Velo's, which were capped under about 300 Hz with internal xover. So, not knowing this issue, you would increase the Velo's output to reach the ”appropriate" dB, but they would be way to hot.

So it all seems to be related to the design of the sub.
brad1138 posts on September 13, 2015 23:04
So, I missed it if we got a definitive answer, does enhanced bass send LFE channel to any speaker set as large or does it include bass from any speaker set as large large to the sub?
brad1138 posts on September 13, 2015 22:49
I believe so, I just got mine and noticed the same thing, I am going to change my mains to “Large” and see if it works all the way around.
swspiers posts on October 28, 2014 20:13
Steve81, post: 1057196, member: 61173
Ditto on the odd part. I was actually trying to see how my new speakers would do without subwoofer support so I switched over to direct mode and was thrown for a loop, particularly since I run with a higher than average XO point.

That is really weird! If the darn thing didn't sound so good, I would be all freaked out by the weird, strange things it does, and doesn't do.
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