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JBL 4367 Studio Monitor Speakers Preview

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JBL 4367 Studio Monitor in Walnut

JBL 4367 Studio Monitor in Walnut

Summary

  • Product Name: 4367
  • Manufacturer: JBL
  • Review Date: January 07, 2016 09:00
  • MSRP: $15,000/pair
  • First Impression: Pretty Cool
  • 3" dual compression driver in a High-Definition Imaging waveguide horn
  • 15" Differential Drive woofer
  • Frequency Range: 30Hz-40kHz
  • Power Handling: 300 watts RMS
  • Sensitivity (1 watt at 1 meter): 94dB
  • Nominal Impedance: 6 ohms
  • Dimensions (H x W x D): 37-1/16" x 22-1/16" x 16-3/4"
  • Weight: 135 lb

 

 

Executive Overview

JBL has released the JBL 4367 Studio Monitors to bring master reference quality into the home. CEDIA 2015 was chocked full of great demos, but one that was at the top of everyone’s list was the JBL Synthesis demo. That demo used their JBL M2 Master Reference Monitors in the main speaker positions. The new JBL 4367 promises much of the same M2 technology, in a slightly more compact package (still 135lb each), along with a built-in crossover allowing the use of conventional home amplifiers. Basically, if you’ve been wanting the lauded JBL M2 sound in your current system, the JBL 4367 is your best bet.

JBL 4367 Black Walnut

JBL 4367 in Black Walnut withgrill removed to expose classic blue front baffle.

Per HARMAN’s press release, the JBL 4367 “incorporates drivers and technologies directly drawn from the company’s M2 Master Reference Monitor to deliver remarkable musical realism and sonic accuracy.” In fact, the high-frequency transducer is identical, though the waveguide on the 4367 is not quite as large and advanced as on the M2. The D2430k is a dual-diaphragm, dual-voice-coil compression driver that employs two annular (ring-shaped) diaphragms and two voice coils to deliver extended high frequency response to 40kHz with extremely low distortion even at high volume levels. The annular diaphragms are not subject to the break-up modes of a conventional dome diaphragm, and the use of two voice coils yields a dramatic increase in output and power handling. Per the press release, “the sonic result is extraordinary clarity and resolution with a rich, musically involving midrange and smooth, accurate high-frequency reproduction that brings out the best in high-resolution music sources and the most demanding program material.

JBL 4367 Waveguide

JBL 4367 Waveguide and High Frequency Trim Controls

“The D2 driver operates into JBL’s newly developed High-Definition Imaging (HDI®) waveguide that provides neutral frequency response both on-axis and off-axis in both the vertical and horizontal planes and a seamless sonic blend with the woofer. The unique geometry of the HDI waveguide enables the JBL 4367 to deliver superlative imaging on a realistic soundstage, with a natural tonal balance at nearly any listening position in a wide range of acoustic environments.”

JBL 4367 Woofer

JBL 4367 Woofer

For the 4367’a low-frequency driver, the JBL 2216Nd 15-inch Differential Drive® woofer used in the M2 was modified with a new spider and a new surround treatment. The cast aluminum frame woofer employs a pure pulp cone material, dual 3-inch voice coils and dual neodymium motor structures to provide “articulate, authoritative low-frequency performance down to below 30Hz.”

JBL 4367 Dual Binding Posts

JBL 4367 Dual Binding Posts

Other features highlighted in the press release include front-panel high-frequency and ultrahigh-frequency trim controls, heavy-duty dual binding posts that allow bi-amping or bi-wiring, and an appearance reminiscent of classic JBL studio monitors with a blue front baffle and choice of furniture-grade walnut or black walnut finishes. The 4367 is rated at 94dB sensitivity, 6-ohm impedance, and 300 watts maximum amplifier power.

JBL 4367 Walnut

JBL 4367 in Walnut Finish

In Conclusion

JBL has been making great speakers for more than half a century, but their recent high-end designs have really starting to catch the attention of audiophiles and pros alike.  The JBL 4367 play on the stellar reputation of the M2 speakers, but in a package that is intended for the home.  While they aren't cheap, it's a safe bet that the JBL 4367 will drop jaws with their sound quality.  The JBL 4367 Studio Monitor are shipping now at a suggested retail price of $15,000 per pair.

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About the author:

Marshall is an Educator by trade, and currently lives in Oregon. He was lucky enough to grow up in a musical household, and though the AV equipment wasn't the greatest, it was always on. His dad introduced him to Queen, Paul Simon, and Sgt. Pepper's, and his mom played Lionel Richie and Disney Soundtracks. When Marshall was 14, his uncle passed down a pair of JBL towers and Marshall finally had his own system. Having enjoyed podcasting and video production over the past 10 years, Marshall is happy to be contributing at Audioholics.

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Recent Forum Posts:

TheWarrior posts on April 10, 2016 05:38
ermesy, post: 1127163, member: 72409
Please excuse the late update but….from Australian Hi-Fi review of JBL's Studio 590 :

Interestingly, despite the preponderance of advertising, all other things being equal, a paper cone is still stronger, lighter, and less resonant than either a polypropylene or a metal cone… but it’s easier to write sexy advertising copy about polypropylene or metal cones than it is about paper cones.

I remember when Jamo released their much lauded R909/907 speakers they went with paper woofers because of their speed and response. JBL and Jamo certainly aren't the only speaker manufacturers to use paper (or “fibre”) in their drivers. Whatmough Audio (an Australian speaker company) also use paper drivers in many of their speakers because, according to their founder Colin Whatmough, they sound “more natural” to the human ear.
Not tryin' to start an argument….just sayin'. I think the quote above about “sexy advertising copy” speaks volumes (pun not intended in a discussion about speakers!!)

Totally agree! That was light sarcasm, I acknowledge that a ‘paper’ cone is hardly a paper product given all the other additives to give it strength and durability.
JRT3 posts on April 09, 2016 07:10
Actually, according to JBL Pro's advertising, you can have their “Image Control Waveguide (which) was developed for JBL's new flagship M2 Master Reference Monitor and with the introduction of the new JBL 3 Series, is now available for the first time in an affordable, compact reference monitor.”. My two LSR-305 ‘Powered Studio Monitors’ do sound pretty good, but I'll bet the 4367 has a bit more low end… Still, at as little as a C-note per unit (Black Friday price…), they do sound pretty good… make super computer speakers, too!
ermesy posts on April 09, 2016 06:27
TheWarrior, post: 1112693, member: 57254
The one positive I see, if the rumor is true, is that JBL has finally figured out the math for the horn geometry. Some consider compression drivers to be the ideal for high frequency performance, but the shape of the horn makes or breaks that.

That said, $15k for a paper woofer does make me cringe. Especially when you consider the competition!

Please excuse the late update but….from Australian Hi-Fi review of JBL's Studio 590 :

Interestingly, despite the preponderance of advertising, all other things being equal, a paper cone is still stronger, lighter, and less resonant than either a polypropylene or a metal cone… but it’s easier to write sexy advertising copy about polypropylene or metal cones than it is about paper cones.

I remember when Jamo released their much lauded R909/907 speakers they went with paper woofers because of their speed and response. JBL and Jamo certainly aren't the only speaker manufacturers to use paper (or “fibre”) in their drivers. Whatmough Audio (an Australian speaker company) also use paper drivers in many of their speakers because, according to their founder Colin Whatmough, they sound “more natural” to the human ear.
Not tryin' to start an argument….just sayin'. I think the quote above about “sexy advertising copy” speaks volumes (pun not intended in a discussion about speakers!!)
CNguyen777 posts on January 13, 2016 22:05
They are probably good speakers or you can get a pair of jbl l100t3 and be happy with their sounds.
Best little secret - a pair of bose 901 V or VI everywhere sweetspots, very coherent, very easy on the ears, great analog soundings out of your wav files..
TheWarrior posts on January 11, 2016 05:45
The one positive I see, if the rumor is true, is that JBL has finally figured out the math for the horn geometry. Some consider compression drivers to be the ideal for high frequency performance, but the shape of the horn makes or breaks that.

That said, $15k for a paper woofer does make me cringe. Especially when you consider the competition!
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