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Denon & Marantz Announce HDMI 2.1 Receivers 4k/120Hz Works Without Issue!

by December 09, 2020
HDMI 2.1 Bug Fixed?

HDMI 2.1 Bug Fixed?

At the end of October, Audioholics reported the discovery of a chipset bug in the latest HDMI 2.1 chipsets sourced by Panasonic and used in the new Denon, Marantz, and Yamaha HDMI 2.1 AV Receivers. The bug can inhibit pass through of 4k/120Hz HDR and 8k/60 HDR for some devices like NVIDIA's newest graphics cards and the latest XBOX Series X gaming console. When engaging these resolutions with these source devices directly connected to an HDMI 2.1 capable receiver utilizing the Panasonic HDMI 2.1 chipset, the user can experience a blank screen.

Some new gaming source devices that support 4K/120Hz output may not work fully with Denon (or Marantz) 8K AVRs. You may discover this incompatibility issue due to a HDMI chipset mismatch between the devices.

--Sound United

Sound United, parent company of both Denon and Marantz, reached out to Audioholics to let us know that they have been working diligently on the problem and have released an official statement regarding the issue.

Sound United completed additional testing and is pleased to report that 4K/120Hz passthrough works without issue on Nvidia and PS5 devices. Outside of what was originally reported regarding Xbox at 4K/120Hz output setting, we have had no further HDMI 2.1 device interoperability issues reported as of this writing.  

Denon used one of its new AVR-X2700 AV receivers to test the problem. The result is that the latest generation of Marantz and Denon AVRs actually can, after all, pass 4K 120Hz through their 8K-capable HDMI port from both the Sony PS5 games console and the Nvidia RTX 30 graphics cards. Sound United even posted a video to ensure that consumers correctly set up their gaming systems for 4K 120 Hz.

To ensure Denon and Marantz customers have the best gaming experience with PS5 and NVIDIA consoles, we created this video that walks users through the optimal set-up process to get the most out of their gaming systems. In this video, we cover how to configure a 2020 Denon or Marantz receiver, a Playstation 5 and an HDMI 2.1 compatible TV for 4K gaming at 120fps.

--Sound United

Configuring For PlayStation 5 With A Denon/Marantz Receiver for [email protected] Gaming

Configuring For Nvidia RTX3090 Graphics Card Users With A Denon/Marantz Receiver for [email protected] Gaming

This is great news for consumers who purchased one of the Denon or Marantz HDMI 2.1 compatible receivers in 2020. Sound United continues to work diligently to nail down a long-term solution for Xbox users who are looking for a 4K/120hz pass-through solution on their 8K AV receivers, which they say “is progressing nicely.”  For the time being, be sure to check out the Sound United video for PS5 for proper 4k/120Hz playback support. We have to hand it to Sound United for not only being on the cutting edge of new technologies but for their open minded approach to fix issues and post videos to help AV enthusiasts get the most out of their systems!

About the author:

Tony is our resident expert for lifestyle and wireless products including soundbars. He does most of the reviews for wireless and streaming loudspeakers and often compares soundbars in round ups and helps us cover the trade shows.

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Recent Forum Posts:

AVR Enthu posts on December 28, 2020 10:58
pcosmic, post: 1446245, member: 90032
These guys go to extreme lengths to get extremely low travel fast responsive buttons, extremely low lag pcbs in their controllers, etc, etc….all this stuff….
No doubt. I agree. Those are priorities for gamers that give them a competitive edge, even more so for pro or semi-pro gamers.

I just used an opportunity to express wider frustration with this year's marketing and implementation of HDMI 2.1 in AVRs. A product that was aggressively targeting gaming part of PC world has not actually delivered, not only for gamers, but more broadly too.
Gmoney posts on December 28, 2020 10:09
Otto Pylot, post: 1445592, member: 90526
A big thanks to all you gamers for beta testing HDMI 2.1 for the rest of us non-gamers .
I don't game, use to with the first PS, My Sons and All of my grandchildren do they all have their own PS 4 and will be getting the 5.
But yeah Thanks Gamers! for all the testing! of these new AVR's. You guy's have been posting up some very valuable info.
pcosmic posts on December 28, 2020 09:45
AVR Enthu, post: 1446228, member: 93878
It's not about gamers only either, as high frame rate is just one of several benefits of HDMI 2.1. Another one is throughput beyond 18 Gbps via RFL lanes, e.g. 4K60 RGB 10 bit content, where input lag is not that relevant. There are professionals and enthusiasts who would like to run their graphic simulations and high quality video projects with lossless music in the background with one simple connection that was supposed to work out of the box, rather than apply temporary workaround after spending so much money on new gear. Their new AVRs have one single HDMI 2.1 port, and it does not work properly. It's simply not acceptable. Many users also have one single HDMI port on their PCs, the one on GPU, and do not want to play with DP-HDMI workarounds, or are not aware of them, just to be able to extract audio. It's yet another hassle to make things work, yet another product to buy.

We can measure it and prove it!
This thread is not focusing on your graphics sims and video projects dude. OP was talking about gaming applications (check thread title again!). My son has a semi-pro gaming hobby. Believe me, i know this whole schpeel from head to toe . If you played anything competitive in the gaming realm (FPSs, fighting games, etc), connecting your video output from the PC into a receiver is pure sacrilege. These guys go to extreme lengths to get extremely low travel fast responsive buttons, extremely low lag pcbs in their controllers, etc, etc….all this stuff….

Sure, if you wanna walk around slowly in a RPG and shoot something gently from time to time (or do your video projects!), knock yourself out, plug it into a receiver, no problemo!
AVR Enthu posts on December 28, 2020 07:33
pcosmic, post: 1446194, member: 90032
Extremely Simple fix:
Plug your hdmi out for video directly into the monitor/tv from gpu. Why the fk should your receiver fck with the video? No, leave the receiver out of it..
( if you played fighting games where every single ms of lag counts, this should already be a no brainer)

Use a 2nd out from your gpu into the receiver for audio only.
You are right that a simple fix could be applied, no doubt about it. And I know that many new owners have tried to resort to it, being out of other choices. But that's not the point here and such fix defeats the purpose of using new technology that has been so widely and frequently advertised, including in more expensive models. HDMI 2.1 apprears to be in the top three features in official adverts and it carries ‘heavy lifting’ as a selling feature. If someone buys a new AVR for hundreds or thousands of $/£/€ after exposure to such adverstisement and numerous presentations of products throughout the summer, one would expect top functions to perform reliably, rather then being told to apply a simple fix. This temporary fix was officially recommended by Sound United too. It's not a fix, let's be clear about it. It's an embarrassment for the company that was not willing to wait long enough for a HDMI 2.1 chip to be properly tested with engineering samples of new sources.

It's not about gamers only either, as high frame rate is just one of several benefits of HDMI 2.1. Another one is throughput beyond 18 Gbps via RFL lanes, e.g. 4K60 RGB 10 bit content, where input lag is not that relevant. There are professionals and enthusiasts who would like to run their graphic simulations and high quality video projects with lossless music in the background with one simple connection that was supposed to work out of the box, rather than apply temporary workaround after spending so much money on new gear. Their new AVRs have one single HDMI 2.1 port, and it does not work properly. It's simply not acceptable. Many users also have one single HDMI port on their PCs, the one on GPU, and do not want to play with DP-HDMI workarounds, or are not aware of them, just to be able to extract audio. It's yet another hassle to make things work, yet another product to buy.

Finally, there are customers whose TVs or monitors do not necessarily have eARC function or their eARC is buggy, as we know from thousands of posts in different fora. Problems with eARC have plagued dozens of devices across the board for several years now and those issues frustrated so many people. The feature was supposed to deliver only one single thing - lossless sound back to AVR. Some new and popular TVs do not support pass through of DTS sound either. So, ‘simple fix’ is not that simple in specific configurations of home theatre or in professional studios.

Your practical advice can work for some users for time-being, which is fine, but it is not surprising that customers are increasingly angry and dissatisfied with multiple malfunctioning features that cannot make their audio-video systems running reliably.
AVR Enthu posts on December 28, 2020 06:07
BlackSpider777, post: 1446032, member: 93194
hmmn, i wonder how denon/marantz are going to fix this issue? I guess new chipsets for the next year models? what about those who bought the Marantz Sr8015 which gets updates once in 3 years? they will have a warranty fix? Interesting it will be.

Thanks.
Recall is becoming more likely with every passing day and testing of new products with HDMI 2.1. It's unfortunate.

This year's models are reportedly on a 3 year cicle, unless they decide to stop production and revamp current models with new boards once a novel chip is ready. This is supposed to happen Q3-Q4 2021. They will certainly need to square the circle of budget vs. trust in the brand.
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