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Panamax-Furman MIW-XT Remote Power Review

by September 23, 2009
Panamax-Furman MIW-XT

Panamax-Furman MIW-XT

  • Product Name: MIW-XT Remote Power System
  • Manufacturer: Panamax-Furman
  • Performance Rating: StarStarStarStarStar
  • Value Rating: StarStarStarhalf-star
  • Review Date: September 23, 2009 05:00
  • MSRP: $ 149.95
  • Buy Now

AC Circuit

  • Total Current Capacity: 15A
  • Line Voltage: 120V, 60Hz
  • AC Outlets, Total: 1

IEC Power Inlet Cord

  • Length: 6 ft.
  • Connectors: IEC 320-C13 and NEMA 5-15R

Flat Plug AC Power Cord

  • Length: 11 inches
  • Connectors: NEMA 5-15P and NEMA 5-15R

Power Inlet Faceplate

  • Signal Line Protection not included, modules sold separately.
  • AC Connector: IEC 320-C14

Power Outlet Faceplate

  • Signal Line Protection not included, modules sold separately.
  • Noise Filtration: Level 1
  • AC Connector: NEMA 5-15

General

  • Product Warranty: Three Years

Single Pack

  • Dimensions: 7.25" W x 5" D x 7" H
  • Weight: 4 lbs.
  • UPC: 0 50616 00848 8

Master Pack

  • Dimensions: 15" W x 10.5" D x 7.5" H
  • Quantity: 4 kits
  • Weight: 17 lbs.
  • UPC: 5 00 50616 00848 3

Pros

  • Works
  • Convenient

Cons

  • Silver doesn't match anything
  • Expensive

 

Panamax-Furman MIW-XT Introduction

When you are planning your new dedicated home theater, one thing is often overlooked - power. While you make allowances for video cables, too often we've seen installations with power run down the wall to an outlet or run illegally via an extension cord inside the wall. While you can run an extra outlet up to the projector, you've got the problem of protection. So unless you plan on installing a UPS in the ceiling or near the projector, you've got a second problem - blackouts and bulb life. If you plan on protecting your projector, the last thing you want is something like the Panamax MX5102 with its 10 outlets wasted by having to place it near the projector. You want it near the rest of your gear so that you can utilize it to the fullest. But, sans an extension cord, what are you to do?

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About the author:

As Associate Editor at Audioholics, Tom promises to the best of his ability to give each review the same amount of attention, consideration, and thoughtfulness as possible and keep his writings free from undue bias and preconceptions. Any indication, either internally or from another, that bias has entered into his review will be immediately investigated. Substantiation of mistakes or bias will be immediately corrected regardless of personal stake, feelings, or ego.

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Recent Forum Posts:

Omega Supreme posts on September 24, 2009 16:17
Thanks JohnA. Now THAT makes sense. I guess that is what Rick was trying to say in post 8.

Rick, If you read my 1st post I stated that was how I had my TV connect for about 5 years now. And no I am not trying to rationalize it, im just trying to understand what the hazard was. Looks like I will be making a trip to HD today:-)
Rickster71 posts on September 24, 2009 13:50
It sounds like you want to / or you already have, run your TV appliance cord through the wall; and are now trying to rationalize it.

Is any answer I can give you really going to matter at this point?

With that in mind, it seems like you aren't completely reading and / or understanding the answers I've already given you.

Appliance cord insulation is rated for ‘free air’ use. That type of insulation has a chance of over heating if used in a enclosed space.
(like a wall cavity)
This slow deterioration and drying out and cracking, will not be seen inside the wall; until it causes a fire.
From my post #8 It has to do with flame spread. Romex and / or in-wall rated wire won't support combustion, once the ignition source is removed.
Wire insulation is much more complicated than ‘just’ the thickness of the insulation. Too much to type here.

NEC 400.8 (Uses NOT permitted)
(1) as a substitute for fixed wiring of a structure. The word “Structure” means house or building. NOT your TV.
JohnA posts on September 24, 2009 13:39
The main issue for not running power cords or ext cords behind a wall is the outer insulating jacket in relation to its fire rating. This rating determines how long a jacket will continue to burn once the heat/flame source is removed. It also covers how much toxic fumes are allowed to be released from the burning jacket. For in wall rated cables the jacket will self-extinguish itself after “X” amount of time. The point is to reduce the spread of fire within a building. Standard power cords and ext cords do not meet these standards and are therefore against code to run them in wall.
Omega Supreme posts on September 24, 2009 08:37
Thanks for answering my questions Rick. I’m still confused thought.

[QUOTE=
NEC 400.8 (Uses not permitted)
(1) as a substitute for fixed wiring of a structure.

Isn't the power cord a “fixed wiring of a structure”. The power cord is fixed to the TV (at least it is on mine).

The code views extension cords as temporary. So much in fact; that holiday lighting cords can be in place for no longer than 90 days. I'm not saying the Xmas light police will show up at your house on the 92nd day, but that's how the code reads.

I’m not talking about using and extension cord but the power cord that is attached to the TV. An extension cord is not the same as a power cord. If it was you could not leave a lamp, microwave or any other electronic device plugged in over 90 days.


I guess here are my ultimate questions: Why is it unsafe to run the “TV's fixed power cord” (not an extension cord) inside a wall? Will it burst into flame? Does putting it behind a 1/2 piece of sheetrock make it more flammable? If so then would it be more dangerous to take the 6' power cord and roll it into a 6“ loop and plugging it into an outlet. It seems like a cord rolled up onto itself would be more dangerous.

Also is this really dangerous. I’m not asking is it against NEC code but if it is really and truly a fire hazard (if so why, please don’t say because it’s not compliant to NEC code because I really want to understand ”why“ it’s a hazard). Take for example: My dad works for Caterpillar as a welder. He had a 4' fiberglass step ladder. One day one of the legs was mashed and it had about a 2” crack. Well according to OSHA he had to throw that ladder away. So he had to get another ladder for work. Well he brought that step ladder home and he made a steel brace for it and bolted it to the cracked leg. It still does not meet OSHA's code but in reality it is just as safe as it was when he bought it. Once again thanks for any comments. I'm really not trying to be hard headed I just want to understand what the hazard is
Rickster71 posts on September 24, 2009 07:00
Omega Supreme, post: 627476
This just doesn't make sense. So there is no power cord that exists today or could ever exist that would be safe to run in-wall? I would think that the NEC has spec's/standards that in-wall wire has to meet and if it meets those specs then it is safe to run in-wall. And how do I know that the power cord does or does not meet those spec's. All of this may be answered if Rickster answers my first question.


Even though this is getting a little weird; I'll take a stab at it.

NEC 400.8 (Uses not permitted)
(1) as a substitute for fixed wiring of a structure. (2) Where run through holes in walls, structural ceilings, suspended ceilings, dropped ceilings or floors…… you get the idea.

The code views extension cords as temporary. So much in fact; that holiday lighting cords can be in place for no longer than 90 days. I'm not saying the Xmas light police will show up at your house on the 92nd day, but that's how the code reads.

Omega Supreme, post: 627476
This just doesn't make sense. So there is no power cord that exists today or could ever exist that would be safe to run in-wall?

Power cord manufacturers know the part of the code that pertains to them; knowing how cords are ruled on, they wouldn't re-invent the wheel. Since in-wall use is already covered by other types of wire.

I agree the code has some quirky parts.- i.e. Federal installations are exempt from the NEC.
Back when I took my code classes, it was on an Air Force base. Since my instructor worked on the base for 30 years; he would walk us around and see if we could find all the code violations. The biggest, was seeing million $ CNC machines powered with S.O. cord. Hope this helps.

Rick
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