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D-Link Media Center Extender Preview

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D-Link  MediaLounge DSM-750 Wireless N High-Definition Media Center Extender

D-Link MediaLounge DSM-750 Wireless N High-Definition Media Center Extender

Summary

  • Product Name: MediaLounge DSM-750 Wireless N High-Definition Media Center Extender
  • Manufacturer: D-Link
  • Review Date: January 14, 2008 13:15
  • MSRP: $329.99
  • First Impression: Pretty Cool
  • Dual User Modes: Extender for Windows Media Center and D-Link MediaLounge
  • MediaLounge Mode Enables Direct Access of Music, Photos, and Videos from PCs, Network Attached Storage, or USB Flash Drives
  • Supports Most Popular Media File Formats
  • Enhanced Wireless Network Security with Support for WPA and WPA2 Encryption
  • Wired 10/100 Fast Ethernet Connectivity
  • HDMI and Component Video Outputs
  • S-Video and Composite Video Outputs
  • Coaxial and Optical Digital Audio Outputs
  • Setup Wizard for Easy Configuration
  • Supports Windows Connect Now for Quick Wireless Configuration Using a USB Flash Drive

Executive Overview

Microsoft was touting a number of media center extenders (other than the Xbox 360) at CES this year. The DSM-750 from D-Link features dual-band wireless Draft 802.11n technology for fast Wi-Fi performance, making the wireless streaming of high-definition video possible. It also offers content from more than 21 providers - including sports, movies and other entertainment. The box as small as a DVD player and seems to have the performance to match. The DSM-750 is an Extender for Windows Media Center that allows you to stream media content from a Windows Vista Premium or Ultimate OS-based PC to a High-Definition TV or Standard-Definition TV. Additionally, Windows Media Center allows you to access and enjoy a large and growing catalog of online entertainment, sports, and news content—all from the comfort of your living room.

The DSM-750 also includes a MediaLounge Media Player mode, which allows a Windows XP OS-based PC to stream music, photos, and videos. This mode also enables streaming of music, photos, and videos stored on a Networked Attached Storage or USB Flash Drive.

If your Windows Vista Premium or Ultimate OS-based PC has an integrated TV tuner, you can watch live TV or record a TV program with Windows Media Center, which features an Electronic Programming Guide that provides schedules for both subscription-based cable/satellite and terrestrial (over-the-air) programming. You can even pause or rewind live TV.

The DSM-750 supports HD video resolutions of up to 1080. To allow steady streaming of HD content over a wireless network, the DSM-750 utilizes draft 802.11n technology, which provides faster speeds and farther reception compared to 802.11g. Since a majority of wireless devices use the 2.4GHz band, the DSM-750 also utilizes MediaBand technology, which provides the option of using the 5GHz band to help minimize interference with common wireless devices, thus improving streaming performance.

The DSM-750 supports HD video in either Windows Media Video 9 or MPEG-2/4 format. Enjoy videos with resolutions of up to 1080p. The DSM-750 includes both HDMI and Component Video outputs and also works with standard definition televisions with S-Video or Composite Video inputs (Composite Video cables included).

The D-Link MediaLounge DSM-750 offers the best of both worlds since it can be used as an Extender for Windows Media Center or a Wireless HD Media Player using MediaLounge. The DSM-750 is available for pre-order for $329.99. For more information, please visit www.dlink.com.

About the author:
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As Associate Editor at Audioholics, Tom promises to the best of his ability to give each review the same amount of attention, consideration, and thoughtfulness as possible and keep his writings free from undue bias and preconceptions. Any indication, either internally or from another, that bias has entered into his review will be immediately investigated. Substantiation of mistakes or bias will be immediately corrected regardless of personal stake, feelings, or ego.

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Recent Forum Posts:

AVRat posts on January 20, 2008 14:20
I guess announcements on upgraded pre/pros was skimpy/non-existent since nothing was reported, eh?
The Chukker posts on January 16, 2008 00:28
Tom Andry, post: 358149
Scratch that - when I wrote that article, I was converting from Yen to $ and came to $1800. Turns out it will cost more like $2500 according to Sony.
Yikes. It would be interesting if someone used the average price points for LCD or Plasma tv's (from say 27“ to 60+”) and then applied that sliding scale model to OLED tv's to give a “rough” idea of what the larger panels would cost in comparison. I know this logic is inherently flawed but geez, $2500 for an 11" tv? pfffff.
Do you get the feeling these guys are just showing off for it's own sake?
Tom Andry posts on January 15, 2008 11:10
Scratch that - when I wrote that article, I was converting from Yen to $ and came to $1800. Turns out it will cost more like $2500 according to Sony. I'd love to see this tech mature but I have a feeling that no one is going to want to invest in it enough to get the infrastructure to the point were they can be produced cheaply. With the majority of the public rolling their eyes at me when I tell them that there is a difference between SD and HD, I can't believe that we're going to convince them that a high contrast ratio is reason enough to spend 5x on an OLED display.
Tom Andry posts on January 15, 2008 09:43
The Chukker, post: 357718
So what kind of price differential are we talking about here? Did Samsung actually have an MSRP for the 31" model? If mass production were to indeed start in 2010 of mid to large sized models, what price point is Samsung shooting for and what was the maximum size they were touting?

Sony just released their first 11" OLED at $1800
Toshiba isn't going to release any at all based on manufacturing costs
[read more]

Samsung didn't talk price (heck, they didn't have a price tag on a single item in their booth) but many times these tech showcases are just stuff they are exploring.
The Chukker posts on January 14, 2008 18:44
“there is ample evidence that OLED will never come down in price enough to be a serious contender against LCDs.”
So what kind of price differential are we talking about here? Did Samsung actually have an MSRP for the 31" model? If mass production were to indeed start in 2010 of mid to large sized models, what price point is Samsung shooting for and what was the maximum size they were touting?
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