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KRK Rokit Powered 6/10s Speaker System Review

by July 13, 2009
KRK Rokit Powered 6/10s Speaker System

KRK Rokit Powered 6/10s Speaker System

  • Product Name: Rokit Powered 6/10s Speaker System
  • Manufacturer: KRK
  • Performance Rating: StarStarStarStar
  • Value Rating: StarStarStar
  • Review Date: July 13, 2009 03:30
  • MSRP: $ 399/each Rokit 6, $599 KRK10s, $1397 group
  • Buy Now

Rokit Powered 6 Studio Monitors

  • Drivers::Woofer - 6" Glass Aramid Composite Woofer Tweeter - 1" Neodymium Soft Dome Tweeter with Ferro Fluid
  • Input::XLR (3-pin), RCA & 1/4" TRS - 10k Ohm, Balanced / Unbalanced
  • Amplification::100 Watt Dynamic Power Bi-amp, 24 dB Octave Filters
  • Freq Response::49Hz - 20kHz (+/- 1.5 db)
  • Video Shielding::Yes
  • Dimensions:(H x W x D):12 11/16" x 8 7/8" x 11 1/2"
  • Shipping Weight::23 lbs

10s Subwoofer

  • 225 Watt (peak) Powered Subwoofer for Studio Use
  • SPL: 110dB Music and 113dB Peak
  • 10” High-Excursion Glass Aramid Composite Woofer
  • Frequency Response: 34Hz – 50Hz to 130Hz Variable (+/- 1.5 db)
  • Variable and Sweepable Low Pass Filter
  • 80Hz High Pass Filter
  • Radically Curved Front Baffle Design for Amazing Performance
  • Front-firing port provides low frequency extension without boundary coupling
  • Bypass Control using Standard Footswitch

Pros

  • Linear
  • Easy placement on desk
  • Front ported
  • Accurate
  • Wide sweetspot

Cons

  • Crossover issues with the 10s
  • Large sub
  • No grills on the monitors
  • Expensive at MSRP

Introduction

While KRK may not be a well known name in the world of home theater, they do have a reputation in the studio market. One of the dangers of getting involved in home theater and high fidelity is that you become incapable (or at least unwilling) to tolerate poor sound - even in your office. I was extremely impressed with the overall performance of the KRK Systems Rokit 6's. Unfortunately, I wasn't as impressed with the system as a whole.
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As Associate Editor at Audioholics, Tom promises to the best of his ability to give each review the same amount of attention, consideration, and thoughtfulness as possible and keep his writings free from undue bias and preconceptions. Any indication, either internally or from another, that bias has entered into his review will be immediately investigated. Substantiation of mistakes or bias will be immediately corrected regardless of personal stake, feelings, or ego.

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Recent Forum Posts:

griffinconst posts on August 30, 2009 16:40
retrace4nothing, post: 615970
Why would a home theater type person be using studio monitors or even expect them to perform for this type of duty?

These monitors are designed for an entirely different purpose.

You are reviewing them using music that is already mixed down, processed and designed to be listened through a typical ‘colored’ home system.

Ridiculous.

First post huh?
mike c posts on August 28, 2009 19:15
retrace4nothing, post: 615970
Why would a home theater type person be using studio monitors or even expect them to perform for this type of duty?

These monitors are designed for an entirely different purpose.

You are reviewing them using music that is already mixed down, processed and designed to be listened through a typical ‘colored’ home system.

Ridiculous.

who said we were all home theater type persons?

we are audioholics. i have an HT setup, bedroom setup, exercise setup, PC setup and a living room setup.

guess where i would use something like the KRK speakers? Duh

what music would you like them to review with?

crazy.
retrace4nothing posts on August 28, 2009 12:49
Duh

Why would a home theater type person be using studio monitors or even expect them to perform for this type of duty?

These monitors are designed for an entirely different purpose.

You are reviewing them using music that is already mixed down, processed and designed to be listened through a typical ‘colored’ home system.

Ridiculous.
WmAx posts on July 15, 2009 00:22
The KRK, at least the Gen 1, was equally suited to near or mid or far field applications. Off axis response was very good and there was a treble shelving function switch with 3 relative levels. Refer to the measurement sets I provided in my first post in this thread.

-Chris
FirstReflection posts on July 14, 2009 23:30
Gene - thank you very much for your reply! That is the first time I've had someone give a very clear, understandable and plausible reason as to WHY a nearfield monitor would not sound as accurate when sitting farther away from it.

Without taking up too much of your time, could you elaborate just a little bit on what sort of differences are made in the cross-over? Rolling off the highs and altering the bass output a little bit - those things I totally understand, but I do not have a really good grasp on what the cross-over would be doing to alter the sound at various distances.

Last question - If I were to take a “Studio Monitor” (as in, a speaker made and marketed as “professional” rather than “consumer”) that specifically says it is for “midfield” listening (I've seen this classification on speakers from brands such as Focal, Genelec, JBL Pro, etc. If it is specifically marked as a “midfield” 1-3m speaker and I use it in my home theater at that distance, is there any reason to expect that it would not sound accurate, good and essentially very close to the way it would sound in a professional recording studio with a midfield mixing position?
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