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MartinLogan Motion 15 / LX16 Bookshelf Speaker Introduction cont.

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The Folded Motion TweeterTweeter.jpg

The pride and joy of the entire Motion Series is the Folded Motion Tweeter. The premise behind the Folded Motion Tweeter is not new, as it is actually an Air Motion Tweeter. Think of a folded ribbon tweeter. A thin diaphragm is taken and folded into an accordion type shape. The diaphragm moves back and forth, like an accordion, and pushes the air out into the room. The diaphragm only moves a small amount, so the overall surface area of the diaphragm is quite large, about 8 times that of a typical dome tweeter. Martin Logan claims to have taken the technology behind a typical Air Motion Tweeter, which until recently has been uncommon in speakers, and improved it.

It is very fitting that MartinLogan would choose to use the Folded Motion Tweeter because they are similar to an electrostatic speaker in a few ways. They use a thin diaphragm, which is supposed to create “lighting fast response.” The diaphragm travels a small distance, which is supposed to decrease distortion when compared to traditional dome drivers. And they offer controlled dispersion, something Martin Logan is very proud about in their Electrostatic speakers. Controlled dispersion allows for less room interaction; however, dispersion patterns that are too tight can create a small sweet spot. The Folded Motion Tweeter has a dispersion of 80° x 80°, which should provide for limited room interaction, while still creating a wide listening area. Below the tweeter is a 5.25” aluminium cone woofer, with a cast polymer basket. Both the tweeter and the 5.25” woofer are slightly recessed behind the front baffle.

The Crossover

I was unable to disassemble the LX16’s to get a peek inside. According to their literature, the LX16’s use Custom air core coil and low DCR steel laminate inductors, polypropylene film capacitors in series and low DF electrolytic capacitors in parallel. It sounds to us like Martin Logan did their homework. Using costlier air core inductors in critical circuit paths and low ESR poly caps in series with the drive elements is a proven way of designing high quality crossovers while minimizing component losses. Martin Logan claims the XL16’s are crossed over at 2700Hz and include thermal/current protection on the tweeter.

Setup

I performed listening tests on a very straightforward system. All CDs and Blu-ray discs were played by a Sony PS3 Slim, hooked up to a Harman Kardon AVR-247 via HDMI. The PS3 handled the decoding to PCM. The LX16s were set to “Large”. The center speaker and subwoofer were disabled. I found that the speakers did not need to be toed in much. They were 4’7” (to the tweeter) away from each other, and 10” from the back wall to the back of the speaker. I was sitting about 6’ from the speakers. As I moved the speakers closer to the wall, the bass was reinforced, but this was expected because of the rear-facing port.

 

 

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Recent Forum Posts:

Tomorrow posts on June 13, 2012 23:21
kmpurc56, post: 886191
Can you give me a comparison to the Aperion Grand Versus Bookshelf speakers?
I'm trying to shorten a list for purchasing a 4 bookshelves and a center for an system using the SVS PC12-NSD subwoofer. I'm also intrigued by using a bookshelf as my center for a matched set. I can always use the extra as a rear speaker in a 6.1 system. Could you help me here as well.

Thanks

Here is a detailed comparison of a half-dozen internet direct (ID) speakers, one of which is the nice Aperion Verus Grand Bookshelf speaker. The entire thread is a good read if you have the time…but you can start with post #95. Post #87 will tell you a little about the format used in doing the comparisons. Good luck with your search. http://forums.audioholics.com/forums/general-av-discussions/67150-2010-great-northwest-gtg-10.html
gene posts on June 12, 2012 13:55
kmpurc56, post: 886191
Can you give me a comparison to the Aperion Grand Versus Bookshelf speakers?
I'm trying to shorten a list for purchasing a 4 bookshelves and a center for an system using the SVS PC12-NSD subwoofer. I'm also intrigued by using a bookshelf as my center for a matched set. I can always use the extra as a rear speaker in a 6.1 system. Could you help me here as well.

Thanks

I did a detailed review of the Verus Booshelf speaker. Great little speaker but you need a sub if you want fullrange sound.

see: Aperion Audio Verus Grand Bookshelf Speaker Review — Reviews and News from Audioholics
kmpurc56 posts on June 12, 2012 12:39
Response

Cliff, Thanks for you input. It was very helpfull.
Cliff_is posts on May 26, 2012 16:20
kmpurc56, post: 886191
Can you give me a comparison to the Aperion Grand Versus Bookshelf speakers?
I'm trying to shorten a list for purchasing a 4 bookshelves and a center for an system using the SVS PC12-NSD subwoofer. I'm also intrigued by using a bookshelf as my center for a matched set. I can always use the extra as a rear speaker in a 6.1 system. Could you help me here as well.

Thanks

I have not had the opportunity to listen to the Versus Grand bookshelf speaker, but Tom Andry was very impressed in his review. If you order them and don't like them, you can send them back for free.

Aperion Verus Grand Loudspeaker System Conclusion — Reviews and News from Audioholics

They are both relatively small speakers. The motion series is probably not as good of a value, if budget is your main concern. I would recommend stopping by your local AV shop, or a Magnolia HT, and listening to the rest of the Motion series. They all use the same Folded Motion tweeter, and are voiced the same. I can't tell you which speaker is better, but they are both good speakers. I can tell you that the Motion series is very forward sounding, a little bright at times. Otherwise, I really liked the speakers and would generally recommend them. But, go listen to them and see if you like them. That is the most important part.

Matching your front three speakers is a great idea. If you have the ability to use the same bookshelf speaker upfront, then go for it. It is a great idea.

However, you may consider dedicated surround channels. Martin Logan makes a Motion FX and Motion FX2 that are designed to be the matching surround speakers for the LX16s. Aperion doesn't make a dedicated surround speaker.

As far as 6.1, it typically doesn't do much good over 5.1. Ultimately, that depends on your room and receiver.
kmpurc56 posts on May 21, 2012 17:01
Comparison

Can you give me a comparison to the Aperion Grand Versus Bookshelf speakers?
I'm trying to shorten a list for purchasing a 4 bookshelves and a center for an system using the SVS PC12-NSD subwoofer. I'm also intrigued by using a bookshelf as my center for a matched set. I can always use the extra as a rear speaker in a 6.1 system. Could you help me here as well.

Thanks
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