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Samsung BD-F5900 Conclusion

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The fact is the Samsung BD-F5900 is a very multifaceted machine. It has apps for MLB, Facebook, and even a web browser. If you have other Samsung devices, it'll use HDMI-CEC to control them or AllShare for streaming content from your Samsung phone (I can say it doesn't work with the Galaxy Nexus but I understand Galaxy S3 and up will work). It's got DTS Neo:6 built in so that you can take your old two channel source (or streamed sources) and turn them into surround at the player rather than at the receiver. If you have having problems with it, you can even call Samsung and they can log into your networked BD-F5900 and troubleshoot it for you. At $120, this is a pretty full featured Blu-ray player. If you are on the market for one, you owe it to yourself to look more fully into what this versus other players can do. You might find that the small DVD upscaling hiccups I experiences and the Netflix idiosyncrasies are an easy tradeoff.

For $119, the Samsung BD-F5900 performs remarkably well. It has a ton of apps, a Wi-Fi connection, and very impressive HQV results. While the real world performance with Netflix and DVD upscaling wasn't the best, it was certainly good enough if it is all you have available. For those that want a cheap solution for playing Blu-rays and streaming without the hassles of running wires, the Samsung BD-F5900 is a solid choice.

Samsung BD-F5900

MSRP: $119

BD-F5900_front

www.samsung.com.

The Score Card

The scoring below is based on each piece of equipment doing the duty it is designed for. The numbers are weighed heavily with respect to the individual cost of each unit, thus giving a rating roughly equal to:

Performance × Price Factor/Value = Rating

Audioholics.com note: The ratings indicated below are based on subjective listening and objective testing of the product in question. The rating scale is based on performance/value ratio. If you notice better performing products in future reviews that have lower numbers in certain areas, be aware that the value factor is most likely the culprit. Other Audioholics reviewers may rate products solely based on performance, and each reviewer has his/her own system for ratings.

Audioholics Rating Scale

  • StarStarStarStarStar — Excellent
  • StarStarStarStar — Very Good
  • StarStarStar — Good
  • StarStar — Fair
  • Star — Poor
MetricRating
High Definition Video PerformanceStarStarStarStarStar
Standard Definition Video PerformanceStarStarStar
High Definition Audio PerformanceStarStarStarStarStar
Deinterlacing & ScalingStarStarStar
Build QualityStarStarStar
Ergonomics & UsabilityStarStarStarStar
Ease of SetupStarStarStarStarStar
FeaturesStarStarStarStarStar
Remote ControlStarStar
Fit and FinishStarStarStarStar
PerformanceStarStarStarhalf-star
ValueStarStarStarStar
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As Associate Editor at Audioholics, Tom promises to the best of his ability to give each review the same amount of attention, consideration, and thoughtfulness as possible and keep his writings free from undue bias and preconceptions. Any indication, either internally or from another, that bias has entered into his review will be immediately investigated. Substantiation of mistakes or bias will be immediately corrected regardless of personal stake, feelings, or ego.

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Recent Forum Posts:

tyhjaarpa posts on September 02, 2015 00:11
sm31, post: 1094797, member: 38630
Brought back from the dead… But I feel compelled to respond to the “imperfect” disc comment.

I have been tempted to frisbee this POS down the street so many times. If atoms on the disc surface aren't aligned perfectly (much less a slight fingerprint or hairline scratch) the thing jags & skips at least once on every disc played.

In fact, other than the whopping 15 seconds I save when loading discs, I hate just about every aspect of this player… with the weird surface pressure type buttons running a close second to the disc sensitivity.

I'm shopping for a replacement for this piece of crap as soon as I finish this post.
If it is still under warranty I would try contacting Samsung fisrt.. Shouldn't skip that easily.
sm31 posts on August 31, 2015 22:14
Brought back from the dead… But I feel compelled to respond to the “imperfect” disc comment.

I have been tempted to frisbee this POS down the street so many times. If atoms on the disc surface aren't aligned perfectly (much less a slight fingerprint or hairline scratch) the thing jags & skips at least once on every disc played.

In fact, other than the whopping 15 seconds I save when loading discs, I hate just about every aspect of this player… with the weird surface pressure type buttons running a close second to the disc sensitivity.

I'm shopping for a replacement for this piece of crap as soon as I finish this post.
fmw posts on August 16, 2013 10:21
Thanks for the review. I'm a BD-F5900 owner. Choosing it was a roundabout process. I needed a narrow profile BD player for my bedroom to fit in the furniture and I bought the BD-5100 to handle that. Interestingly, when I got smudged or scratched BD's from Netflix, My Panasonic 220 in the home theater would fall to its knees in a heap of misery. Strangely, I could take most of those discs and play them without an issue on the $69 5100 upstairs. I finally got tired of the Panasonic's fussiness about what it was served and bought the BD-F5900 to replace it, hoping it would save me having to watch so many BD's in the bedroom that I would rather watch downstairs. The 5900 has acquitted itself well.

I don't use the Samsung remote. My Harmony One is backlit. I like the large timer display because it is easy to read. I don't notice it because the unit is near the floor on the bottom shelf of the audio furniture. I have yet to use the manual control circle. It is boots twice as fast as the Panasonic and I appreciate that.

I have only two problems with it. The first is that it won't accept a wireless keyboard for use with the browser so I don't use the browser. The second is that I'm unable to download any of the apps in the Samsung app store. I'm not much of a streamer so that isn't huge for me. There is a real computer only two rooms away so I can live without the player's browser.

And best of all, it isn't brought to its knees by imperfect Netflix Blu-Ray discs. I certainly recommend it.
smurphy522 posts on August 16, 2013 08:46
Of note to Amazon Prime and Instant Video users this device is listed on Amazon's website as one of Samsung's two BD players that will stream/run this service. Link to all Amazon compatible devices here. It is odd that Samsung does not list a full complement of all the streaming services available on their players. LG and some other popular brands do not either.


I would suggest to future reviewers that when possible all streaming services be listed. Although in many of the Sony BD player's case that may be a page of details.
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