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Samsung BD-F5900 Menus

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I'm not going to go crazy on the SmartHub or menu systems for the Samsung BD-F5900. Frankly, Samsung just snatched up Boxee and I expect that there are going to be some major interface changes in Samsung's future. Harping on what is sure to be a dying interface seems pointless.

The main menu system for the Samsung BD-F5900 was well laid out and easy to navigate. For the most part, Samsung did a good job of letting you know what each setting was going to do. For example, when choosing between PCM and Bitstream, it let you know that some audio wouldn't work if you used Bitstream. Some people seem genuinely unaware that having their receiver do the decoding can make some audio (generally voiceovers and other secondary audio) unusable.

BD_f5900_menu1     BD_f5900_menu2

BD_f5900_menu3

The first time you turn on the unit, you are walked through a setup. You'll choose your language, your connection type, and connect to your network (if you choose wireless). Your preferred TV Aspect Ratio is also chosen at this time which I think is a nice addition and will hopefully eliminate (or at least reduce) the amount of stretching that goes on in people's homes.

The rest of the menus are fairly obvious including Display, Audio, Network, Smart Features, System, and Support. The Smart Features menu is for Apps Settings, VOD Rating Lock, and resetting your Smart Hub (which is the main app page). The Support menu should mostly be ignored unless you are doing a firmware update.

BD_f5900_home_menu     BD_f5900_apps

BD_f5900_vod

The Smart Hub is basically a grid of apps that you have chosen to download. If you visit the Samsung App store, you'll find fifty or so different apps including games like Texas Holdem, weather apps, some of your favorite services (Hulu, Amazon Prime, etc.), and even silly ones like Aquarium and Angry Birds videos (I didn't even bother with that one). Many have lamented the Smart Hub but I found it perfectly serviceable if not an overly inspired interface. I press the button, I get a wall of apps, I choose an app, and it starts.

 

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Recent Forum Posts:

tyhjaarpa posts on September 02, 2015 00:11
sm31, post: 1094797, member: 38630
Brought back from the dead… But I feel compelled to respond to the “imperfect” disc comment.

I have been tempted to frisbee this POS down the street so many times. If atoms on the disc surface aren't aligned perfectly (much less a slight fingerprint or hairline scratch) the thing jags & skips at least once on every disc played.

In fact, other than the whopping 15 seconds I save when loading discs, I hate just about every aspect of this player… with the weird surface pressure type buttons running a close second to the disc sensitivity.

I'm shopping for a replacement for this piece of crap as soon as I finish this post.
If it is still under warranty I would try contacting Samsung fisrt.. Shouldn't skip that easily.
sm31 posts on August 31, 2015 22:14
Brought back from the dead… But I feel compelled to respond to the “imperfect” disc comment.

I have been tempted to frisbee this POS down the street so many times. If atoms on the disc surface aren't aligned perfectly (much less a slight fingerprint or hairline scratch) the thing jags & skips at least once on every disc played.

In fact, other than the whopping 15 seconds I save when loading discs, I hate just about every aspect of this player… with the weird surface pressure type buttons running a close second to the disc sensitivity.

I'm shopping for a replacement for this piece of crap as soon as I finish this post.
fmw posts on August 16, 2013 10:21
Thanks for the review. I'm a BD-F5900 owner. Choosing it was a roundabout process. I needed a narrow profile BD player for my bedroom to fit in the furniture and I bought the BD-5100 to handle that. Interestingly, when I got smudged or scratched BD's from Netflix, My Panasonic 220 in the home theater would fall to its knees in a heap of misery. Strangely, I could take most of those discs and play them without an issue on the $69 5100 upstairs. I finally got tired of the Panasonic's fussiness about what it was served and bought the BD-F5900 to replace it, hoping it would save me having to watch so many BD's in the bedroom that I would rather watch downstairs. The 5900 has acquitted itself well.

I don't use the Samsung remote. My Harmony One is backlit. I like the large timer display because it is easy to read. I don't notice it because the unit is near the floor on the bottom shelf of the audio furniture. I have yet to use the manual control circle. It is boots twice as fast as the Panasonic and I appreciate that.

I have only two problems with it. The first is that it won't accept a wireless keyboard for use with the browser so I don't use the browser. The second is that I'm unable to download any of the apps in the Samsung app store. I'm not much of a streamer so that isn't huge for me. There is a real computer only two rooms away so I can live without the player's browser.

And best of all, it isn't brought to its knees by imperfect Netflix Blu-Ray discs. I certainly recommend it.
smurphy522 posts on August 16, 2013 08:46
Of note to Amazon Prime and Instant Video users this device is listed on Amazon's website as one of Samsung's two BD players that will stream/run this service. Link to all Amazon compatible devices here. It is odd that Samsung does not list a full complement of all the streaming services available on their players. LG and some other popular brands do not either.


I would suggest to future reviewers that when possible all streaming services be listed. Although in many of the Sony BD player's case that may be a page of details.
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