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Denon DBP-4010UDCI Universal Blu-ray Disc Player First Look

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DBP-4010UDCI

DBP-4010UDCI

Summary

  • Product Name: DBP-4010UDCI Blu-ray player
  • Manufacturer: Denon Electronics
  • Review Date: September 18, 2009 02:00
  • MSRP: $1,999
  • First Impression: Pretty Cool
  • Buy Now

Executive Overview

When you put out a $4500 Blu-ray player and then next one in your line retails for $800, you need something in between. While the $2000 price tag for the DBP-4010UDCI may not be exactly midpoint, it certainly rounds out Denon's lineup of Blu-ray players. The DBP-4010UDCI is what we are calling a Universal Blu player. This is a player that can play not only Blu-ray discs and DVDs, but also SACDs and DVD-As. For your audiophile looking for a one stop solution, the DBP-4010UDCI may be it.

As you'd expect from Denon, the DBP-4010UDCI sports the latest in video upconversion and scaling via ABT VRS processing. They also included the proprietary Denon Link 4th Edition which incorporates the new HDMI clock control feature. This allows the connected Denon receiver to control the master clock of the player to eliminate digital jitter via HDMI. 

Of course all the latest audio formats are supported and can be decoded internally including Dolby TrueHD and DTS HD. The DBP-4010UDCI can also bitstream these formats to a capable receiver if you so choose. The 12 bit, 297MHz Analog Devices Video DACs are top of the line as are the Burr-Brown 24/192 PCM1796 audio DACs for high quality discrete 2-channel playback.

DBP4010UDCI_Back.jpgThe back of the unit sports all the usual connections including a single output of each type (HDMI, component, S-video, composite, coaxial, and optical). You have a choice between 7.1 channel analogue outputs or a set of dedicated two-channel outputs. For your hardcore audiophile, the two channel outputs are perfect for pairing with an analogue preamp/amp combo for a high quality two channel experience. The stereo outputs automatically downmix everything to stereo so you could (theoretically) use these if you are running a stereo system without having to worry about changing the audio designation on whatever movie you are watching.

The newest innovation with the DBP-4010UDCI is that it is the first player to include a built-in web browser and remote access capabilities, allowing iPhone and iPod Touch remote control via LAN/network as well as installer remote setup and configuration functionality. This is great for higher end users (or maybe just people that love to use their iPhone for everything) and installers.

Conclusion

The DBP-4010UDCI isn't cheap unless all you have to compare it to are the top of the line Denon, Marantz or Lexicon players. Still, for the added money, you are getting top of the line components, cutting edge technology, and the piece of mind that you could have spent thousands more. While we don't expect the DBP-4010UDCI to fly off the shelves at this price point, for the user that has to have (almost) everything, or at least wants to match his other high end Denon components, this is the player for them.

For more information, please visit usa.denon.com.

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About the author:

As Associate Editor at Audioholics, Tom promises to the best of his ability to give each review the same amount of attention, consideration, and thoughtfulness as possible and keep his writings free from undue bias and preconceptions. Any indication, either internally or from another, that bias has entered into his review will be immediately investigated. Substantiation of mistakes or bias will be immediately corrected regardless of personal stake, feelings, or ego.

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Recent Forum Posts:

jomark911 posts on October 03, 2009 08:26
Well i suppose there is one ,the final d to a so that analog signal comes out of the prepro or the receiver.
westcott posts on October 02, 2009 09:44
jomark911, post: 630414
I wasn't talking about denon link , which of course is digital transfer , and there is only one digital to analog conversion.
I was refering to the analog output of the player and passed on the analog input of the prepro or the receiver.

I know you were not but our point is, if you keep it in the digital domain, there are NO conversions, from beginning to end.
jomark911 posts on October 02, 2009 09:29
I wasn't talking about denon link , which of course is digital transfer , and there is only one digital to analog conversion.
I was refering to the analog output of the player and passed on the analog input of the prepro or the receiver.
westcott posts on October 02, 2009 09:01
jomark911, post: 630391
There is no further analog to digital conversion in the prepro , or av receiver ,
as far as denon's , except if you want to activate the bass management.
I own a avp a1hd , and there is a direct menu , as if you want to apply dsp or not on the analog signal.I choose not to, so the analog pure direct signal goes to volume and then passed on to the power amp.

John

Sorry, but this is wrong. ALL CD, DVD, and BR is digital to begin with. Sending it via analog does require a conversion, and as SethL stated, the DenonLink is supposed to be a straightforward way of keeping it digital without any conversions at all.
jomark911 posts on October 02, 2009 08:13
Alittlemonster, post: 625349
Seth=L has missed the point. Sure CAT 5 cables can be had real cheapie if you like cheapie cables…can even make up one any length needed. However, the CAT 5 cable is not the problem. DLIII is a feature that doesn't seem to work as it should. And why change a digital signal to analog via the player's DAC, then connect it to a Denon reciever via its analog inputs only to have it reconverted back to digital via an ADC in order to use the pre-amps processing, then back to analog via the receiver's DACs? That's a lot of conversions, when, if the DLIII worked properly to begin with, the signal would stay digital all the way and the pre-amp/signal processing within the receiver can be used as intended.

Now, I don't know if the new DLIV also has problems, but until Denon can come up with an answer, I'm not willing to chance my hard earned bucks to find out. That's the point Seth=L.

There is no further analog to digital conversion in the prepro , or av receiver ,
as far as denon's , except if you want to activate the bass management.
I own a avp a1hd , and there is a direct menu , as if you want to apply dsp or not on the analog signal.I choose not to, so the analog pure direct signal goes to volume and then passed on to the power amp.

John
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