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Samsung HW-C700 AV Receiver Review

by Dave DeBorde November 24, 2010
Samsung HW-C700 AV Receiver

Samsung HW-C700 AV Receiver

  • Product Name: HW-C700
  • Manufacturer: Samsung
  • Performance Rating: StarStarStar
  • Value Rating: StarStar
  • Review Date: November 24, 2010 01:35
  • MSRP: $ 399.99
  • Buy Now
  • 7.1 ch Discrete Analog Amplifier (990 watts)
  • HDMI 1.3 x4 Inputs / x1 Output
  • Decoding of Dolby TrueHD, dts-HD Master Audio
  • Independent Audio Board for Improved Sound
  • Simple Set-up ASC Auto Calibration
  • Component Video x2 Inputs / x 1 Output
  • Analog Audio Inputs x5, Digital Audio Inputs x3
  • Samsung Remote
  • On Screen Display for Setup through HDMI out
  • Glow Key, Precode Remote Control
  • Dimensions: 17.2" x 6.6" x 14.7"
  • Weight: 13.7 lbs

Pros

  • Slim
  • 4 x HDMI inputs
  • ASC button controlled auto sound calibration
  • Can pass through 3D video
  • Full HD audio support via HDMI
  • Includes iPhone/iPod dock with video support
  • 2 subwoofer outputs (parallel)

Cons

  • No input level control
  • No Audio Return Channel
  • Difficult to find tone controls
  • No on-screen menu
  • No analogue to HDMI video upconversion
  • No AM radio

Samsung HW-C700 Introduction

With the advent of Blu-ray players and advanced, hi-def gaming systems and all that they require, it has become increasingly important to have a centralized unit that can handle not only the latest audio formats, but also the centralizing of your HDMI sources. A recent quote from a popular TV show comes to mind, "Is there anything that money can't do?" If you have the means, you can get any number of high-end pieces to act as a video and sound hub for your AV/gaming needs, but for those without limitless resources, but with enough to get Blu-ray and the occasional Xbox 360 or PS3, there needs to be an economical answer to this need. The $399 HW-C700 receiver is Samsung's answer which packs many of the functions of a full-size receiver into a smaller chassis. This is a unit that can work with a large system but is also good for smaller living spaces where a larger component system is simply too much for the budget to support.

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Recent Forum Posts:

brawsky posts on November 30, 2010 05:49
Thanks for the info
Seth=L posts on November 25, 2010 14:54
Bismarck, post: 768834
Since the receiver is so lightweight I wonder if it is using a class A/B amp or a switching amp? Either way, power hasn't been a big issue for me.

I'm sure the Samsung uses a switching power supply feeding some derivitive of Class D amplification.
Bismarck posts on November 25, 2010 12:06
I have actually setup a number of these receivers and wouldn't give them too glowing of a review. They sound fine for the price, and match other Samsung components well. The lack of transcoding to HDMI is a real concern for me. Also, the lack of an audio return channel (ARC) is annoying for people using an OTA antenna hooked right to their TV.

I have had a number of problems with the receiver dropping audio. For a few clients, I have had to set their blu-ray Players to re-encode the new HD sound formats for the receiver to work properly.

Since the receiver is so lightweight I wonder if it is using a class A/B amp or a switching amp? Either way, power hasn't been a big issue for me.

Still, there is nothing that makes this receiver stand out over the other competition, other than the included iPod dock. The Denon AVR-591, for less money, has ARC, transcoding to HDMI, and a lot more setup features. The crossover on the Denon isn't global, you can set an volume limit so our kids don't crank it up too loud, and you can set a power on volume level. I am not a Denon fanboy, but their receiver at this price point is much better in my opinion.
3db posts on November 25, 2010 11:09
M Code, post: 768810
Nope..
Reason is lack of interoperability with other HDMI components..

Just my $0.02…

What? With all them standards kicking around and you still have interoperability issues? Who'd a thunk it?
M Code posts on November 25, 2010 10:08
Seth=L, post: 768796
Failure probably occurs whenever a 4 ohm load is encountered.

Nope..
Reason is lack of interoperability with other HDMI components..

Just my $0.02…
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