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Onkyo TX-RZ3100/1100 Atmos A/V Receivers & Inflated Power Ratings

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Summary

  • Product Name: THX STX-RZ3100 Network A/V Receiver, TX-RZ1100 Network A/V Receiver, and PR-RZ5100 Network A/V Controller
  • Manufacturer: Onkro
  • Review Date: September 18, 2016 21:00
  • MSRP: $3,199 TX-RZ3100, $2,199 TX-RZ1100, $2,399 PR-RZ5100
  • First Impression: Pretty Cool
  • Buy Now

PR-RZ5100 11.2-Ch Network A/V Processor

Power
Frequency Response    5 Hz-100 kHz/+1 dB, -3 dB (Direct Mode)
Signal-to-Noise Ratio    110 dB (Line, IHF-A) 80 dB (Phono MM, IHF-A)
Video Section
Input Sensitivity/Output Level and Impedance
Video    1.0 Vp-p/75 ohms (Component) 0.7 Vp-p/75 ohms (Component PB/CB, PR/CR) 1.0 Vp-p/75 ohms (Composite)
Tuner Section
Tuning Frequency Range
FM    87.5 MHz–107.9 MHz
AM    530 kHz–1,710 kHz
FM/AM Preset Memory    40 stations
General

Power Supply    AC 120 V~, 60 Hz
Power Consumption    65 A
Standby Power Consumption    0.15 W
Dimensions (W x H x D)    17 1/8" x 7 13/16" x 18 3/8" (435 x 199 x 466.5 mm)
Weight    30.9 lbs (14.0 kg)

THX Select2 Plus-certified 11.2-channel TX-RZ3100 Network A/V Receiver

Power Output
All Channels    200 W/Ch (6 Ohms, 1 kHz, 0.9% THD, 1 Channel Driven, FTC)
140 W/Ch (8 Ohms, 1 kHz, 0.08% THD, 2 Channels Driven, FTC)
Dynamic Power    320 W (3 Ohms, Front)
270 W (4 Ohms, Front)
160 W (8 Ohms, Front)
THD+N (Total Harmonic Distortion + Noise)    0.04% (1 kHz, 100 W)
Input Sensitivity and Impedance    200 mV/82 k-ohms (Line) 3.5 mV/47 k-ohms (Phono MM)
Frequency Response    5 Hz–100 kHz/+1 dB, -3 dB (Direct/Pure Audio)
Tone Control    ±10 dB, 100 Hz (Bass)   ±10 dB, 10 kHz (Treble)
Signal-to-Noise Ratio    108 dB (Line, IHF-A) 90 dB (Phono, IHF-A)
Speaker Impedance    4 ohms–16 ohms
Video Section
Video    1.0 Vp–p/75 Ohms (Component Y)  0.7 Vp–p/75 Ohms (Component PB/CB, PR/CR)   1.0 Vp–p/75 Ohms (Composite)
Component Video Frequency Response    5 Hz–100 MHz/+0 dB, -3 dB
Tuner Section
Tuning Frequency Range
FM    87.5 MHz–1070.9 MHz
AM    530 kHz–1,710 kHz
FM/AM Preset Memory    40 stations
General
Power Supply    AC 120 V~, 50/60 Hz
Power Consumption    340 W
No-Sound Power Consumption    -
Standby Power Consumption    0.15 W
Dimensions (W x H x D)    17 1/8" x 7 15/16" x 17 13/16" (435 x 201 x 453 mm)
Weight    43.0 lbs (19.5 kg)

9.2-channel TX-RZ1100 Network A/V Receiver

Power Output
All Channels    200 W/Ch (6 Ohms, 1 kHz, 0.9% THD, 1 Channel Driven, FTC)
   140 W/Ch (8 Ohms, 1kHz, 0.08% THD, 2 Channels Driven, FTC)
Dynamic Power    320 W (3 Ohms, Front) 270 W (4 Ohms, Front) 160 W (8 Ohms, Front)
THD+N (Total Harmonic Distortion + Noise)    0.04% (1kHz, 100 W)
Phono Overload    70 mV (MM, 1 kHz, 0.5%)
Frequency Response    5 Hz–100 kHz/+1 dB, -3 dB (Direct/Pure Audio)
Tone Control    ±10 dB, 100 Hz (Bass) ±10 dB, 10 kHz (Treble)
Signal-to-Noise Ratio    108 dB (Line, IHF-A) 90 dB (Phono, IHF-A)
Speaker Impedance    4 ohms–16 ohms
Video Section
Input Sensitivity/Output Level and Impedance    -
Video    1.0 Vp–p/75 Ohms (Component Y)
     0.7 Vp–p/75 Ohms (Component PB/CB, PR/CR)
     1.0 Vp–p/75 Ohms (Composite)
Component Video Frequency Response    5 Hz–100 MHz/+0 dB, -3 dB
Tuner Section
Tuning Frequency Range
  FM    87.5 MHz–1070.9 MHz
  AM    530 kHz–1,710 kHz
FM/AM Preset Memory    40 stations
General
Power Supply    AC 120 V~, 50/60 Hz
Power Consumption    320 W
Standby Power Consumption    0.15 W
Dimensions (W x H x D)    22 1/4" x 7 15/16" x 17 13/16" (435 x 201 x 453 mm)
Weight    43.0 lbs (19.5 kg)

Executive Overview

Custom home theater installers will be happy to see Onkyo’s new lineup of A/V receivers this week at the CEDIA show in Dallas, Texas.  Built with custom integration in mind, each Onkyo RZ Series receiver contains features to make installation and integration with control systems easy.  Connectivity options include RS-232, IR and 12v triggers as well as PC setup, detachable power cables and optional rack kits, simplifying installation. This is the second wave of products from its premier RZ Series, including two top-of-the-line A/V receivers: the THX Select2 Plus-certified 11.2-channel TX-RZ3100 Network A/V Receiver and the 9.2-channel TX-RZ1100 Network A/V Receiver, along with a flagship THX Ultra2 Plus-certified 11.2-channel PR-RZ5100 Network A/V Processor.

onkyo5100back     3100 back     1100back

Onkyo's Newest Lineup:  The  PR-RZ5100 Network A/V Processor (left), TX-RZ3100 Network A/V Receiver (middle), and the 9.2-channel TX-RZ1100 Network A/V Receiver (right)

Onkyo RZ Series Atmos AV Receivers and Processor YouTube Video Preview

All three receivers are said to be designed with enough high current power to drive large floor standing speakers with the ability to add additional height or ceiling speakers to unlock the full multi-dimensional experience delivered by built in Dolby Atmos and DTS:X which incorporates DTS Neural:X technology to up-mix lossless multichannel surround formats such as DTS Master Audio, to emulate height effects and give listeners a 3D experience that’s close to a native object-based soundtrack.

An Important Note About Inflated Power Ratings

We don't like the recent trend in power ratings we've been seeing by some of the manufacturers since Dolby Atmos has been introduced.  Before Atmos, most receiver companies would at least give you a 2CH, full bandwidth power rating at a distortion level below clipping (usually 0.1% or less).  Now they all seem to be playing the numbers games in hopes the uninitiated consumer won't notice.  These latest Onkyo receivers are a prime example and as a result we are calling them out on it.

Onkyo Power

Onkyo Power Rating of TX-RZ3100 Per their Website

WOW this receiver puts out 200 watts/ch All Channels Driven?  NOT!  Look more closely.  This is one channel driven at 6 ohms and at 0.9% (very close to clipping and very high in residual harmonic distortion).

This 200 wpc rated receiver is actually more like 140 wpc honestly rated.

Let's use a little Ohm's Law to figure this out.  If P = V*I and I = V/R then V = sqrt(PR) =>  Therefore 200 watts at 6 ohms translates to 34.6Vrms and driving an 8 ohm load (which is how most amplifiers are rated), this gives you P = V^2/R = 150 watts.  Now let's not forget this is at near clipping.  So in reality, this amp is good for a clean 140 wpc and that's for 1CH driven.  We will give Onkyo the benefit of a doubt that their power supply is large enough to drive at least two channels at this power level.  But surely you can now you can see this 200 wpc receiver is really 140 wpc more honestly rated.  Let's keep it honest guys and stop the BS power ratings please!

Features Galore

In addition to Zone 2 pre outs with independent HDMI output and Zone3 pre out, all three units include 11.2 channel preamp RCA outputs, the PR-RZ5100 features balanced XLR connectors.  The TX-RZ1100 and TXRZ3100 feature Zone 2 and 3 powered outputs for driving speakers in other rooms.  Additional multi-room wireless audio capabilities are offered via optional FireConnect.

All three products offer Google Cast, AirPlay, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, Spotify, TIDAL, TuneIn, and Pandora with any app-based audio entertainment cast seamlessly to the theater room and beyond using a user-friendly Onkyo Remote application.

3100     1100

TX-RZ3100 and the TX-RZ1100

For movie and game soundtracks, hi-res audio, and stereo sources, both the TX-RZ3100 and the TX-RZ1100 feature a new Onkyo Hi-Current Digital Amplification system that pairs with AccuEQ and AccuReflex technologies designed to optimally balance and phase-align sound in any listening space.  The three models feature premium AKM 384kHz/32-bit digital-to-analog conversion technology and VLSC noise-free processing on all channels, which helps remove pulse-noise.  

All three products feature separated digital and analog circuitry to minimize interference, custom low-hum transformers, and bespoke audio-grade capacitors for smooth and instantaneous power, while componentry and attention to detail throughout reflects the products’ flagship status.

Each include HDCP 2.2 compatibility and a host of 4k video features over HDMI including BT.2020 color, High Dynamic Range, 4:4:4 color space, and 4K/60 Hz should the user choose to update their display or projector in the future.

Finally, the RZ Series is backed by a three-year warranty and features priority customer support.

The TX-RZ3100 (MSRP: $3,199), TX-RZ1100 (MSRP: $2,199) and the PR-RZ5100 (MSRP: $2,399) will be available next month.

Confused about what AV Gear to buy or how to set it up? Join our Exclusive Audioholics E-Book Membership Program!

About the author:

Tony is our resident expert for lifestyle and wireless products including soundbars. He does most of the reviews for wireless and streaming loudspeakers and often compares soundbars in round ups and helps us cover the trade shows.

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Recent Forum Posts:

PENG posts on November 08, 2018 16:49
RuiSilva, post: 1279816, member: 86678
Interestingly the RZ1100 can drive seven channels continuously into 8-ohm loads with 0.1% distortion at 103.2 watts and 1% distortion at 126.5 watts.
The Marantz SR7011 can drive seven channels continuously into 8-ohm loads with 0.1% distortion at 75.1 watts and 1% distortion at 90.4 watts.
If one performs the analysis of the power delivery to 2/5/7 channels for each AVR one can assume the SR7011 will have issues handling 9 channels continuously on higher power consumptions (see image below).
26457
Buy using a simple linear regression for both AVR's (although the SR seems more like a polynomial then linear, this is only to prove a point!) class D of the RZ can “easily” handle the higher demand of channels when compared to the AB amps of the SR counterpart. RZ1100 could handle 9 channels @ near 90W/channel with 0.1% distortion while the SR7011 can “only” handle near 50W/channel with 0.1% distortion.
It is my opinion that these new Monster AVR's with 11/13 channels must be tested in their full capacity. After all, people that buy these AVR's intend to use them in their full capacity either immediately or in a not so distant future upgrade.
It is my belief that class D amplification is the way of the future when we start talking about Receivers with 9/11/13/(and above!) channels. In both terms of power delivery (power efficiency) and thermal management of the receivers internals.

Obviously class D makes sense for the much better efficiency but between the two I would take the Marantz for the better distortion figures and the better 2 channel driven into 4 ohms performance. You are right about the marginally better 5/7 channel driven output figures but those have low to zero practically value for real world applications.
RuiSilva posts on November 06, 2018 14:59
Interestingly the RZ1100 can drive seven channels continuously into 8-ohm loads with 0.1% distortion at 103.2 watts and 1% distortion at 126.5 watts.
The Marantz SR7011 can drive seven channels continuously into 8-ohm loads with 0.1% distortion at 75.1 watts and 1% distortion at 90.4 watts.
If one performs the analysis of the power delivery to 2/5/7 channels for each AVR one can assume the SR7011 will have issues handling 9 channels continuously on higher power consumptions (see image below).
26457
Buy using a simple linear regression for both AVR's (although the SR seems more like a polynomial then linear, this is only to prove a point!) class D of the RZ can “easily” handle the higher demand of channels when compared to the AB amps of the SR counterpart. RZ1100 could handle 9 channels @ near 90W/channel with 0.1% distortion while the SR7011 can “only” handle near 50W/channel with 0.1% distortion.
It is my opinion that these new Monster AVR's with 11/13 channels must be tested in their full capacity. After all, people that buy these AVR's intend to use them in their full capacity either immediately or in a not so distant future upgrade.
It is my belief that class D amplification is the way of the future when we start talking about Receivers with 9/11/13/(and above!) channels. In both terms of power delivery (power efficiency) and thermal management of the receivers internals.
Verdinut posts on October 08, 2018 19:53
In the summary, you indicate that the manufacturer is ONKRO.

I thought I would mention it so that this little mistake be corrected.

Cheers,
3db posts on December 28, 2016 01:06
vsound5150, post: 1162927, member: 80931
My Marantz SR7010 notes at the bottom of the power amp specs “70% Guarantee”. That's enough honesty for me. If not, I just throw an external amp at it or replace it no big deal.

My first Onkyo had issues making loud poping and crackling sounds out of the subs and other issues it was part of a large recall. The replacement unit sounded ok but no chance against the Marantz, at least for my listening.

All the ACD test measures is the sensitivity of the protection circuit which begins to limit output power based on a threshold set by the manufacturer, nothing more. It's an invalid test for measuring an Ava's power capabilities.
yepimonfire posts on December 27, 2016 14:42
Pace, post: 1163703, member: 81061
I gave you that marantz combos measurement as reference; it is rated at 8 ohm, full bw at 150W per channel… so, if the 1khz at 6 ohm load would be much less taxing, the marantz should have given way more output. But it doesn't.

From what I understand, while full bw is more taxing, the difference isn't huge by any means. The impedance naturally affects the output, but given that the 7-channel load is basically limited by the power supply, I'd be surprised if it actually differs a lot from that 6 ohm figure. As you can see, the 4ohm and 6ohm figures with 7 channels driven are basically the same due to this.

The reason why your receiver is unable to give you more than 50w per channel all channels driven is either the fact that it is rated at 110w with only TWO channels driven, the power supply is underrated or it is just poor design and bs marketing. But you can't really generalize based on that.

My point is that unfortunately you cannot really trust any of the figures provided by the manufacturers with these receivers… I much prefer to see some actual measurements done by someone else before making a decision.

I feel like this discussion should be in a separate article rather than linked to onkyos receiver preview as majority of manufacturers are to blame… and I don't consider these onkyos to be even close to the worst offenders. Even in the video (as the guy talking is talking about 200W rating) the card below them clearly states them as 140W/channel receivers. The 200W rating is just one extra line of spec, similar to the ones on marantzs website; with ridiculous ratings with 10% THD…

And if someone purchases these based on that 200W figure (which already tells me that they don't actually know what to look for), I'm pretty confident that they'll be more than happy with the actual power output…
http://www.audioholics.com/audio-amplifier/the-all-channels-driven-acd-amplifier-test

It's the difference between audible distortion and inaudible distortion.

Either way the difference in output between 100w and 150w is so small it's inaudible. You would need to go from 100w to something like 600w for it to sound noticeably louder. If you need 20dB in headroom and you're 6dB short at 100wpc you'd need more power than you could even draw from a 20 amp circuit 110v circuit.
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