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NAD Electronics T 747 and T 737 AV Receivers Preview

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NAD Electronics T 747

NAD Electronics T 747

Summary

  • Product Name: NAD Electronics T 747 and T 737
  • Manufacturer: NAD Electronics
  • Review Date: January 09, 2009 02:15
  • MSRP: $1,299 - $799
  • First Impression: Pretty Cool
  • Buy Now

Executive Overview

NAD Electronics introduced two new AV receivers: the T 747 ($1,299) and T 737 ($799). The T 747 AV receiver features 60 watts (x7) channels and uses high-current discrete output devices. The T 747 also includes the newest lossless audio CODECs from Dolby and DTS, including TrueHD and DTS HD Master Audio, and even discs lacking a TrueHD will benefit from the higher bit rates and discrete 7.1 channels supported by Dolby Digital Plus. An auto calibration function using a special microphone and test tones to make speaker set-up easy and highly accurate.

High quality AM and FM tuners offer 50 station presets, as well as XM (120V) or DAB (230V) ready sockets for clear access to these digital broadcasts using NAD's XM or DB 1 adaptors. The T 747 also supports NAD's optional IPD 1 and IPD 2 Docks for iPods, allowing audio, video and images stored on an iPod to be played directly on an NAD Home Theater.

On the video side, the T 747 fully support signals up to 1080p resolution from HD set-top boxes and Blu-ray players, and includes 4 HDMI inputs with a repeater function that automatically passes along the HDMI video signal after stripping the audio portion. It's capable of 'upscaling' older analog video formats to digital HDMI output, and standard definition signals to HD using Faroudja DCDi technology.

The T 747 offers a second independent A/V zone along with RS-232C to integrate the receiver with advanced (AMX, Crestron, Control4, etc) control systems. Two remote controls are included, one for the primary listening zone and one for the remote zone. The main remote also controls other NAD components, simplifying system operation.

T737The T 737 AV Receiver uses a system of 'virtual inputs' that allows each user to perfectly customize the setup. Users select an input, rename it, associate it with any video and audio source, analog or digital, and carry on until there's an input for each source in the system. Unused inputs can be hidden from the interface until needed. Additional customization can be added for different speaker setups, levels, tone controls and surround modes. Both receivers use less than one watt for standby power consumption.

The T 737 delivers 40 watts to each of its seven channels. Its three surround modes automatically cater to multichannel-encoded DVDs using Dolby Digital EX and DTS ES, encoded two-channel recordings with Dolby ProLogic IIx and DTS Neo:6, and NAD's own EARS and Stereo Enhanced modes, which are perfect for creating convincing surround sound from unencoded sources like CDs.

All seven channels offer the same high performance using high current discrete output devices. An Auto Calibration function using a special microphone and test tone makes speaker setup easy and highly accurate.

In addition to high quality AM and FM tuners offering 50 station presets, the T 737 offers XM (120V) or DAB (230V) Ready sockets for clear access to these digital broadcasts, The T 737 also supports NAD's optional IPD 1 and IPD 2 Docks for iPods, allowing audio, video and images stored on an iPod to be played directly from the NAD video outputs.

Video quality is good an the receiver includes the requisite composite, S-video, and component video. HDMI signals are simply switched without any extraneous processing or loss of quality (audio is not pulled from the HDMI source).

The T 747 and T 737 AV Receivers will be available in January and February 2009 respectively from authorized NAD dealers at suggested prices of $1,299 and $799.

For more information please visit www.nadelectronics.com.

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About the author:

As Associate Editor at Audioholics, Tom promises to the best of his ability to give each review the same amount of attention, consideration, and thoughtfulness as possible and keep his writings free from undue bias and preconceptions. Any indication, either internally or from another, that bias has entered into his review will be immediately investigated. Substantiation of mistakes or bias will be immediately corrected regardless of personal stake, feelings, or ego.

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Recent Forum Posts:

Lordoftherings posts on June 07, 2009 07:00
NAD, hein!

^ That sounds pretty good so far.

And very true about their power ratings being conservative.
Vracer111 posts on June 07, 2009 06:36
I just got my NAD T747 last Thursday. Very impressed with it so far, though I don't have much experience with higher end receivers (just Pioneer and Sony low end). Have demoed mid range/high end Denons and Onkyo receivers at Fry's selecting the exact same speaker models I have in my 5.1 system though (All Polk Audio; RTi-A5 fronts, CSi-A4 center, FXi-A6 surrounds, and PSW PRO 500 sub.) First thing I did after getting the speakers connected (added banana connects to receiver side of wiring) and settings configured was play the intro chase sequence and song of “Quantam of Solace” in DTS.
Center channel had really good volume level (all speakers at deafult 0 dB gain level settings in receiver), there were sounds I hadn't heard before, and man the bass to midrange response on the gunshots was definately more punchy and very lifelike.

Even with a 60 WATT/channel rating there is plenty of power to make you go deaf quick…along with having your chest massaged by the bass at high levels. I'll take NAD's “60 WPC” over others 100+WPC…. Music sounds really good at 0 dB reference level with hearing protection on… But even at a subdued -40 dB level music is incredible, the entire frequency range is crystal clear with bass extremely well defined in Stereo mode.

The function menu is done via on screen display which works great, but would be nice if the front display could be used for displaying and configuring settings as well, I hate to turn on the projector just to mess with audio settings.
3db posts on April 24, 2009 10:45
CraigV, post: 557557
That sounds like a lot of money for not a lot of power. I mean, I know NAD makes good stuff, but

Unlike Denon or Yamaha, they are conservative on their power measurements in the same way as Harmon Kardon.
3db posts on April 24, 2009 10:44
admin, post: 506881
NAD Electronics introduced two new AV receivers: the T 747 ($1,299) and T 737 ($799). The T 747 AV receiver features 60 watts (x7) channels and uses high-current discrete output devices. The T 747 also includes the newest lossless audio CODECs from Dolby and DTS, including TrueHD and DTS HD Master Audio. The T 737 delivers 40 watts to each of its seven channels. Its three surround modes automatically cater to multichannel-encoded DVDs using Dolby Digital EX and DTS ES, encoded two-channel recordings with Dolby ProLogic IIx and DTS Neo:6, and NAD's own EARS and Stereo Enhanced modes, which are perfect for creating convincing surround sound from unencoded sources like CDs.


Discuss “NAD Electronics T 747 and T 737 AV Receivers” here. Read the article.


Its been 3 monthes since I asked you this question. Again I ask, Will you be providing a full report on these units including detailed power tests? Its only polite to return an answer of yes or no.
CraigV posts on April 24, 2009 10:41
That sounds like a lot of money for not a lot of power. I mean, I know NAD makes good stuff, but
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