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Marantz SR7002 Receiver Review

by March 22, 2008
Marantz SR7002 HDMI Receiver

Marantz SR7002 HDMI Receiver

  • Product Name: SR7002 AV Receiver
  • Manufacturer: Marantz
  • Performance Rating: StarStarStarStarhalf-star
  • Value Rating: StarStarStarStarhalf-star
  • Review Date: March 22, 2008 21:35
  • MSRP: $ 1399
  • Buy Now
  • HD Audio Support: Dolby TrueHD, Dolby Digital Plus, dts-HD Master Audio
  • DSP: Analog Devices HammerHead SHARC 32 bit floating point DSP processor
  • Power Ratings: 7 x 110 watts per channel (8 ohms, 20 Hz-20 kHz, <.05%THD)
    Audio DAC: Crystal 192 kHz/24bit DAC x 7
  • HDMI: 1.3 with support for Deep Color, 24p and SACD/DVD-Audio support
  • Crossover: 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, 150, 200, 250Hz
  • Remote: EL backlighting pre-programmed/learning remote
  • Video Inputs: 4 x HDMI (1.3); 3 x Component Video (100MHz); 7 sets composite and S-video inputs
  • Video Outputs: 100MHz Component video output, 3 composite and s-video outputs, Multi-Zone composite video output
  • Audio Inputs: 7.1 external wide bandwidth (100 kHz) multi-channel inputs, 5/7 Channel Stereo, DENON Link 3rd (SACD & DVD-Audio compatible), 7 assignable digital inputs (5 optical, 2 coaxial), 10 analog inputs
  • Audio Outputs: 2 optical digital outputs, 2 multi-zone stereo pre-amp level audio outputs, fixed or variable level
  • Additional Connections: RS-232C port for third party control Systems, remote I/O ports, 2 assignable +12V triggers, detachable power cord
  • Dimensions: 17 5/16" x 7 1/4" x 15 5/8"
  • Weight: 33.1 lbs

Pros

  • THX Select2 Certification
  • 4 x HDMI 1.3a inputs; 2 x HDMI outputs
  • Dual component video outputs
  • Deep Color, xvYCC Support
  • Dedicated Zone 2 Remote
  • RS-232C control & dual 12V triggers

Cons

  • Only 480i/p upconversion via HDMI
  • Can use only one HDMI output at a time (not parallel)
  • Remote has quirky pre-programmable functions

 

Marantz SR7002 Introduction

Internally, we are dubbing 2008 "The Year of the Receiver." Ever since CES we've been excited about getting our hands on some of the year's newest products which boast so much in terms of features and value. If you travel back 8-9 years ago most flagship receivers, for around $1700, offered 5 channels of amplification, Dolby Digital and a fixed 90Hz subwoofer crossover. Component video inputs weren't yet available (and just forget about video conversion) and digital video certainly wasn't even in anyone's thoughts.

Fast forward to 2008 and the playing field is awash with multiple manufacturers throwing in their weight behind products that contain more features than we would have ever thought possible at these prices. HDMI switching is now available at less than $400, but the Marantz SR7002 hits home at that critical flagship-but-not-priced-as-one level. At just under $1400, the SR7002 provides those features that really make an AV receiver sing - features that aren't available at lower prices. Features a true Audioholics craves.

 

About the author:
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Clint Deboer was terminated from Audioholics for misconduct on April 4th, 2014. He no longer represents Audioholics in any fashion.

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Recent Forum Posts:

mouettus posts on May 02, 2008 16:17
mpedris, post: 408262
How might the SR-7002 drive a 4 ohm or 6 ohm load continuously?

A friend is considering buying this receiver to drive the Mirage OMD-5 (rated at 6 ohms) or Sonus Faber Concertino (rated at 4 ohms).

Might a Denon AVR-3808 do a better job at driving the said speakers?

Thanks in advance for any help.

IMO, I wouldn't even consider driving 4ohm speakers continuously on a receiver point.

6ohm might be ok… check the manual/call for tech support.
mpedris posts on May 02, 2008 10:59
How might the SR-7002 drive a 4 ohm or 6 ohm load continuously?

A friend is considering buying this receiver to drive the Mirage OMD-5 (rated at 6 ohms) or Sonus Faber Concertino (rated at 4 ohms).

Might a Denon AVR-3808 do a better job at driving the said speakers?

Thanks in advance for any help.
Gary Pavlovich posts on April 28, 2008 20:14
What are your thoughts on the Harman Kardon AVR247?

To “intheindustry,”

What is your experience with the latest Harman Kardon AVR 247 product?

I am putting together my HT setup and purchased this unit, still new in the box, and haven't installed it yet but reading all the current “problems” should I switch to the Onkyo 605 or 606 for better quality and sound?

Being new to HT, is there an appreciable sound/video quality difference with 1.3 vs. my Harman AVR 247's 1.1 (1.2?) setup?

I would like the best sound and picture in this price range.

Thank you for any help!

Gary
geraldan posts on April 28, 2008 04:50
Marantz SR7002

Setting up HT system, considering this AV receiver. A couple of questions: My centre channel is 4 ohm, 88 db, max power 100w, fronts will be 8 ohm 87db max power 80w, rears 8 ohm 85 db max power 100w - will this receiver do the job?
Regarding its video capabilities, if I get a Blu Ray player such as the Panasonic BDP HDK 50 (or 30) and play a regular DVD (not Blu Ray), will the Blu Ray player upscale to 1080p, and so are the “limitations” of the Marantz video upscaling irrelevant (it only upconverts 480i/p via HDMI)?
Thanks, geraldan (a newbie to all of this technical stuff!)
Seth=L posts on April 12, 2008 11:45
Lower impedance speakers are harder to drive because they require more power. Most receivers run out of gas so to speak when trying to drive a constant 4 ohm load at reference levels. Speakers don't ask for power, they take it, and sometimes they try to take more than the power source can handle dishing out, but the power source tries to give the speakers all the power they want even if it's not meant to do so. One of two things will occur if the speakers are taking too much power, it will shut down (protection mode) or it will eventually break down the power source from massive heat build up.
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