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Marantz SR4002 7.1 A/V Receiver w HDMI 1.3

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Summary

  • Product Name: SR4002 Surround Receiver
  • Manufacturer: Marantz America
  • Review Date: January 26, 2008 09:20
  • MSRP: $549.99
  • First Impression: Gotta Have It!
  • Buy Now

 

  • Number of Channels: 7.1
  • DTS (ES, Discrete 6.1/ Matrix 6,1, Neo-6) • (+ 96/24) Dolby Digital EX, Dolby Pro Logic IIx, Circle Surround II
  • SOUND ENHANCEMENTS
  • HDCD Decoder
  • Discrete Amplification (All 7 ch)
  • Power Transformer EI
  • D/A Conversion 192kHz/24-Bit
  • Digital Signal Processing Cirrus Logic® 32-bit
  • Video Off
  • Source Direct
  • Chassis metal
  • Variable X-over
  • Display Off
  • Video Up-conversion S-Video to Component
  • M.R.A.C (Marantz Room Acoustic Calibration)
  • IN/OUTPUTS VIDEO

    • HDMI In 3
    • Component In 3
    • S-Video In 5
    • Composite In 5
    • HDMI Out 1
    • Component Out 1
    • S-Video Out 2
    • Composite Out 2

IN/OUTPUTS AUDIO

  • Analog L&R In 7
  • Analog L&R Out 3
  • Digital Optical In 3
  • Digital Coaxial In 2
  • Digital Optical Out 1

 

OTHER

  • Pre-Amplifier Out 8ch
  • Multi-Channel In 8ch
  • Speaker A/B Surround Speaker “B”
  • D-Bus Remote (RC-5) In/Out 1/1
  • External IR In/Out 1/0
  • Front Panel A/V Inputs (+ Digital Opt.)
  • Headphone Out (Dolby Headphone)
  • AC Outlets (Switched/Unswitched) 1/0

AUDIO SECTION

  • Power Output (8 Ohm) 80x7
  • S/N Ratio 105dB
  • Freq. Response (Analog In) 8Hz - 100kHz (+/- 3 dB)
  • Freq. Response (Dig In) 8Hz - 45kHz (+/- 3 dB)

TUNER SECTION FM

  • Frequency Range 87.5 - 108.0MHz
  • S/N Ratio (Mono/Stereo) 75/70

TUNER SECTION AM

  • Frequency Range 520 - 1710kHz
  • S/N Ratio 50dB

VIDEO SECTION

  • Video Freq. Response (Component) 5Hz - 80MHz (-1 dB)
  • Video Freq. Response (Composit, S-Video) 5Hz - 8MHz (-1 dB)
  • Signal to Noise 60dB

GENERAL

  • Color Black
  • Front Panel Aluminum
  • Remote Control
  • Power Requirement AC 120V/60hz Power Consumption 450W

Executive Overview

With features such as seven channels of all discrete amplifier stages, HDMI V1.3 Switching with V1.1 Repeating, (7.1) LPCM via HDMI, and a ridiculously low MSRP of only 549.99, The Marantz SR4002 surround receiver just might be the best buy of the year.

From the legendary company of Marantz comes an entry-level home theater receiver that raises the bar in performance and features that will no doubt have many wondering how are they making a profit. From their humble beginnings in the 1950’s and their rise to audio prominence in the 1970’s, Marantz has always been a force to reckon with. Although they fell off the audio map for a while in the late 80’s and early 90’s, the last fifteen years or so has seen Marantz come back with a vengeance. This latest crop of receivers from Marantz is sure to raise the eyebrows of audio enthusiast, and cause heartburn to some other audio companies.

SR4002 Front PanelIn keeping true to their audiophile heritage, the receivers amplifier section is rated at 80-watts x 7 with all discrete amplifier stages. Also, The SR4002 receiver comes fully loaded with features previously found on units that were considerably more expensive. These features include 192kHz/24-bit processing on all seven channels, full complement of DTS processing including DTS 96/24, Dolby Digital EX and Pro-logic IIx, Dolby headphone, HDCD decoding (unheard of in this price range), HDMI V1.3 switching and V1.1 repeating, S-video up conversion to component, 8-channel input and 8-channel pre amplifier outs, (this will have some separates people thinking), and M.R.A.C. auto calibration. The receiver also supports 7-channels of LPCM over HDMI for compatibility with HD DVD and Blu-Ray disc players. We think this is one heck of a feature set for a receiver in this price range.

SR4002 Back PanelThe Marantz SR4002 is no slouch when it comes to inputs either. Most receivers in this price class are usually input challenged, but not the Marantz. Having no less than three HDMI inputs, three component inputs, five S-video, five composite video, two each of both optical and coaxial digital inputs as well as front panel inputs, this receiver can handle it all. As always, fit and finish appear to be excellent on this receiver and we would expect nothing less from Marantz. We just think it is an extra special bonus to have this all carry down to an entry-level receiver.

When features and quality are a must, but the budget is a little tight, the Marantz SR4002 comes to the rescue with an impressive set of features and an even more impressive price that will leave even the most finicky of spouses smiling, and your neighbors drooling. Just don’t tell them how little you spent.

For more information, visit: http://us.marantz.com/

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Recent Forum Posts:

ZeroPlex posts on May 11, 2010 06:04
Would this amp be capable of driving 2x200w rated front floorstanders (6 ohm 90db), 1x200w rated centre (6 ohm 90db), 2x120w rated surround floorstanders (6 ohm 86db)?

I'm currently using a 4002 with the 2x120w 86db 6ohms as fronts, a 150w 6ohm 88db centre and 120w 86db 6ohm surrounds.

Seems to be doing an ok job, but always wonder what a better amp could do for me. Do you think the amp is ok for my current setup?

I was looking ahead to the future with the first setup I mentioned.

Was the actual power of this receiver ever measured by any of the usual websites that do so?
allargon posts on August 21, 2009 23:35
Lordoftherings, post: 601913
Actually, there are no true 7.1-channel discrete recordings at all, even on Blu-ray. This is a FACT.

All 7.1-channel encoded audio recordings, mixed by the studio sound engineers, are all derive from 5.1 audio stems, to create the two additional rear surround channels. Ask any professional recording studio engineer, and they will confirm this fact.
* Here's few names that you can contact: Roger Dressler, ex-audio engineer at Dolby Labs, Kal Rubinson, Stereophile writer, Marc Fishman, professional film mixer,
Chris, from Audyssey head department, and many more…

Really? I wonder about all those discs released by Surround Records.

If you said there were no 1080p30 encodings on Blu-Ray, I would believe you.
johngalt47 posts on August 21, 2009 18:52
I have been using my SR4002 for a while now and still can't get the audio from my DVD player to come through this receiver. The audio from my Directv comes through just fine but when I press the DVD button for the source nothing happens.

Am I missing something?
Lordoftherings posts on July 28, 2009 08:07
redass, post: 602289
I believe there are ps3 games that output 7.1 channels, although I suppose they are not really “recordings”. You can reference any 16-year-old you like, but I'm not giving out any names.

I for one like the difference between 6.1 and 5.1 channel surround, although I would not say it's a LARGE difference. I think maybe the difference between 6.1 and 7.1 might be even less than 5.1 - 6.1, though.

1. Beats me man, I did not know that there are “not true recordings”. Well, for PS3 gamers, the sound effects with the music are all prefabricated; but they are still real recordings, just not in real space, like a live band. Same thing happens with the sound effects from a movie. But the music soundtrack in a film, is “often” from a live orchestra recording, large or small.

2. These guys are not 16-year old kids.

3. I love using my 7.2-channel surround sound system with all movies recorded in Dolby Pro Logic, DD, DTS, Dolby Digital Plus, Dolby TrueHD, DTS-HD High Resolution Audio & DTS-HD Master Audio.
* I just feel more enveloped with all those seven (7) speakers and two (2) subwoofers all around my head. It gives me the Vertigo effect.
** The difference, SMALL or LARGE, between 5.1, 6.1, 7.1, or 7.2-channel, is not important to me; as long that I'm totally and fully integrated with the surround dimensional and spatial euphoria, I'm Oki-Doki.

Cheers,
Bob
redass posts on July 27, 2009 16:53
Lordoftherings, post: 601913
Actually, there are no true 7.1-channel discrete recordings at all, even on Blu-ray. This is a FACT.

All 7.1-channel encoded audio recordings, mixed by the studio sound engineers, are all derive from 5.1 audio stems, to create the two additional rear surround channels. Ask any professional recording studio engineer, and they will confirm this fact.
* Here's few names that you can contact: Roger Dressler, ex-audio engineer at Dolby Labs, Kal Rubinson, Stereophile writer, Marc Fishman, professional film mixer,
Chris, from Audyssey head department, and many more…

I believe there are ps3 games that output 7.1 channels, although I suppose they are not really “recordings”. You can reference any 16-year-old you like, but I'm not giving out any names.

I for one like the difference between 6.1 and 5.1 channel surround, although I would not say it's a LARGE difference. I think maybe the difference between 6.1 and 7.1 might be even less than 5.1 - 6.1, though.
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