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LPX-510 Features, Setup and Installation

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LCD vs. DLP Projectors

Nope. Not here - don't have the time. But suffice to say that this is a brand new 3-chip LCD projector and one that we had personally seen at CES 2004. To sum up the LCD vs. DLP competition (and yes there are other technologies as well) - it's "screen door" versus "rainbow effect". Both technologies can optimize to nearly overcome both problems but only the best are going to be able to go head to head as viable options in a high-performance system. Yamaha's new LPX-510 can easily be considered one of the best LCD projectors based on what we had seen prior to this review. Now we'll take a look at it in more detail to see if it can handle a much more intimate assessment.

Features and Favorites

The Yamaha LPX-510 had a host of excellent features and functions that made it a tremendously configurable projector as well as an adaptable one. Here are a few of my favorites that stood out on initial use and inspection:

Cinema & Cinema Black Picture Modes

We're so used to hearing fancy marketing terms for bad design ideas that when a good one comes along we really need to spend a lot of time with it before signing on. In the case of Yamaha Cinema and Cinema Black picture modes, the results are simply excellent. These modes adjust an optical filter that reduces green and blue levels while allowing the full dynamic range of the image to remain. Similar to how the new HD2+ systems have added an extra dark green segment to the DLP color wheel, Yamaha's Cinema filters serve to increase the contrast ratio of the picture and produce deeper, more realistic blacks without loss of detail. The Cinema Black filter takes this an extra step by adjusting the Iris down to 75%.

Faroudja DCDi FLI2300 Processing

We found the Genesis (Faroudja) chip to be as impressive as ever. The LPX-510 performed admirably with respect to catching edit errors and 2:3 pulldown and the deinterlacing and scaling performance was top notch according to our test discs.

Lens Shift

Need to place the projector slightly off center from the screen? No problem. The Yamaha LPX-510 allows you to adjust the image position using the Lens Shift function - up to a half screen width or full screen height.

We'll go into these in more detail but these features, and Yamaha-s implementation of them makes this projector really stand out among its peers.

Basic Setup and Installation

There are a couple of things you need to concern yourself with when purchasing a front projection system. First and foremost you'll need to determine the mounting position for the projector and, concurrently, what type and size of screen will be required for a good fit. For this review we utilized a Stewart StudioTek 130 screen, This is an ISF (Imaging Science Foundation) certified screen and is optimized for excellent white levels while allowing for deep, rich blacks in a light-controlled room. For those considering the Yamaha LPX-510 in their home theater room, take a look at the 16:9 throw chart:

Throw Chart for Distancing the Projector from a 16:9 Projection Screen

Screen Size
Diagonal (inches)

Size (Inches)

Distance (Feet)

Offset (inches)


width

height

wide

tele

min

max

30

26.1

14.7

2.85

4.36

-14.71

7.35

40

34.9

19.6

3.86

5.86

-19.61

9.81

60

52.3

29.4

5.86

8.85

-29.42

14.71

70

61.0

34.3

6.86

10.35

-34.32

17.16

80

69.7

39.2

7.86

11.85

-39.22

19.61

90

78.4

44.1

88.6

13.35

-44.12

22.06

100

87.2

49.0

9.86

14.84

-49.03

24.51

110

95.9

53.9

10.87

16.34

-53.93

26.96

120

104.6

58.8

11.87

17.84

-58.83

29.42

130

113.3

63.7

12.87

19.33

-63.73

31.87

150

130.7

73.5

14.87

22.33

-73.54

36.77

170

148.2

83.3

16.87

25.32

-83.34

41.67

200

174.3

98.1

19.88

29.82

-97.05

49.03

230

200.5

112.8

22.88

34.31

-112.76

56.38

300

261.5

147.1

29.89

44.79

-147.08

73.54

The Stewart StudioTek 130 screen we utilized is the 100" diagonal 16:9 version with a Luxus Deluxe Screenwall mount. This screen is an excellent fit with this projector due to its adherence to the strictest color and white field uniformity standards. This material has a gain of 1.3 meaning it is over 30% brighter than standard matte white surface materials. It supports viewing angles of up to 160 degrees - very good for home theater use and one of the widest possible viewing angles for front projection screens.

We positioned the projector in a temporary, but excellent location. It was centered horizontally with the screen and set back about 12' 10" right in the middle of the throw distance range. The projector was vertically oriented so that the lens was vertically aligned with the bottom of the screen - well within the lens shift range.

We ran two different cables to the projector for our tests. A rather robust and well-shielded component video cable was supplied by Cobalt Cable and gave us an excellent analogue connection from the Denon DVD-5900 player's BNC outputs. A well-built DVI-A to HDMI cable system was also supplied by Gefen, Inc . which enabled us to compare the digital video connection from the Denon DVD player as well.

If you plan on placing the projector in front of the screen on a level surface (as opposed to ceiling mounting the unit) keep in mind that you'll want to level the projector and utilize the Lens Shift knobs to make the final adjustments to align your picture. The lens shift knobs on the LPX-510 have a little bit of play in them, so you may have to finesse them a bit to get the picture perfectly aligned within the frame of your projection screen. Raising all the projector's feet to achieve a flat throw to the screen is essential to avoid keystoning the image onto the screen. Keystoning in a fixed pixel display will result in loss of resolution and should be avoided at all costs. Always try to relocate the projector before giving in to the +/- 15% Keystone adjustment.

 

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