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Optoma H31 Projector Review

by April 19, 2005
Optoma H31 DLP Projector

Optoma H31 DLP Projector

  • Product Name: H31 DLP Projector
  • Manufacturer: Optoma
  • Performance Rating: StarStarStarStar
  • Value Rating: StarStarStarStarStar
  • Review Date: April 19, 2005 20:00
  • MSRP: $ 1299
  • Buy Now

Display Technology: Single 0.54-inch 12-degree DarkChip2 DLP Technology from Texas Instruments
Brightness: 850 lumens (typical)
Resolution: 480p (854 x 480) native (SXGA (1280 x 1024) compressed  
Contrast Ratio: 3000:1 (full on/off)
I/O connectors: DVI-I with HDCP, RCA component (YPbPr), S-video, Composite video (RCA), two IR receivers, AC power input, RS-232
Displayable Colors: 16.7 million, 256 shades of gray
Noise Level (typical): 30 dB standard
Lamp Type & Life: 200W P-VIP lamp; 2,000 hours Brightmode / 3,000 hours STD
Image Size: 28 to 304 inch (0.7 to 7.7 meters) diagonal
Computer Compatibility: SXGA, XGA, SVGA, VGA Compression, VESA standards, PC & compatibles, Macintosh
Video Compatibility: NTSC, PAL, SECAM, HDTV (720p, 1080i)
Video Scaling:  Pixelworks PW16

Deinterlacing:  Pixelworks PW1231
Projection Lens: f = 19.7 - 23.6 mm. F/2.4 - 2.7, manual focus & zoom
Keystone Correction: +/- 16 degrees
Throw Ratio: 1.65 to 2.0 (distance/width)
Horizontal Scan Rate: 15-70 kHz
Vertical Refresh rate: 43 to 85 Hz
Power Supply: 100-240 volts, 50-60Hz
Power Consumption: 270 watts (maximum), 5 watts (standby mode)
Operating Temperature: 50 - 104 degrees F (10 - 40 degrees C); 80% humidity
Projection Method: Front/rear/ceiling mount/table-top
Uniformity: 90%
Standard Accessories:  AC power cord, RS232 cable, S-Video cable,  composite video cable, backlit wireless remote control, batteries for remote, lens cap (hanging), user's guide.
Optional Accessories:  DVI to HDMI adapter,  DVI to HD15 (D-Sub) adapter, SCART RGB/s-video adapter (European market)
Dimensions: 10.7 x 3.4 x 8.3 in (272 x 86 x 211 mm)
Weight: 5 lbs (2.2 kg)


Pros

  • * Good contrast
  • Deep black levels
  • Eye-popping color saturation
  • Versatile inputs (including DVI-HDCP)
  • 5 presets available per input
  • Inexpensive unit with high overall performance

Cons

  • Lower resolution means a longer seat-to-screen distance
  • No physical lens shift
  • May be awkward to use as a tabletop unit due to rather high projection angle
  • Manual focus

Introduction

We get asked fairly regularly to review more budget-minded products for our readers. In particular, everyone seems fascinated by the influx of lower-priced front projection systems that are competing for a large financial portion of the home theater display market. These front projection systems promise large viewing screens with an almost unbeatable price point. Compare, for example, a 92" front projection DLP system vs. a DLP-based rear projection unit and you are talking a potential savings of over 60-70%! It doesn't take a Nobel Lauriat to figure out where the bargain is. Sure there are trade-offs, mostly in terms of ambient light management and viewing distance, but if you can overcome these obstacles then you are looking at a tremendous opportunity.
About the author:
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Clint Deboer was terminated from Audioholics for misconduct on April 4th, 2014. He no longer represents Audioholics in any fashion.

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Recent Forum Posts:

mpompey posts on March 01, 2008 17:56
weisy12, post: 382620
…I think the setup disk might be the way to go for me, is the avia better than the essentials setup dvd? I was trying to save myself the step and the $. I am fairly new at all this, i was not sure if I just adjusted the brightness and contrast levels and left the advanced adjustments alone if the picture would be clear and crisp…

IMO, the Avia setup disc is a bit easier to navigate than DVE. I own both however. Considering the time and money you've invested so far, the costs of the DVDs are well worth it. I doubt you'll need to go into the advanced measurements area. Between contrast, brightness, color, tint, & sharpness. You'll more than likely be very satisfied with the picture. Since you are just starting out, the truly advanced measurements are best left to trained A/V professionals.

Welcome to Audioholics, you'll find a ton of information and experienced folks here. Don't be afraid to ask.a
weisy12 posts on March 01, 2008 08:49
H31 calibration

I understand that everyones room is different and some settings would be different, I guess I am trying to get some input on brightness and contrast levels, as well as the rgb brightness and contrast levels. I think the setup disk might be the way to go for me, is the avia better than the essentials setup dvd? I was trying to save myself the step and the $. I am fairly new at all this, i was not sure if I just adjusted the brightness and contrast levels and left the advanced adjustments alone if the picture would be clear and crisp. Some specs on my system, I have a DIY 115 inch screen and my projector is back 18ft, everything is dvi and hdmi, ps3(bluray) and I have a yamaha rx-v1700 receiver, with full B+W surround sound, expressvu HDTV.
majorloser posts on February 29, 2008 12:44
gene, post: 64070
Yea I just completed a review of a $6,000 receiver

Let me know when you need help with that Denon pre/pro and amp
mpompey posts on February 29, 2008 10:01
Which settings in particular are you looking for? Do you have the Avia setup disc? You'll need to set the unit up within the context of your current room, screen, gear, etc.

Using someone else's setting can make the image display look worse, not better. The avia setup cd takes about 15-20 minutes if you take your time. I have the H30 and I usually adjust my every 250 hours on the bulb.
weisy12 posts on February 29, 2008 08:54
optoma h31

I am also looking for calibration settings for the h31, if anyone can be of assistance that would be great.
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