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Axiom Audio W3 Speakers Installation Video

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Summary

  • Product Name: W3 In-wall/On-wall speakers
  • Manufacturer: Axiom Audio
  • Review Date: September 25, 2007 20:00
  • MSRP: $500/pair
  • First Impression: Pretty Cool
  • Buy Now
Max Amp Power:
175 Watts
Min Amp Power:
10 Watts
Response +/- 3dB:
60 Hz – 22 kHz
Response + 3dB/- 9dB:
50 Hz – 22 kHz
Impedance (Ohms):
8 Ohms
SPL in Room1w/1m:
91 dB
SPL Anechoic 1w/1m:
87 dB
X-Over
2.2 kHz
Tweeter:
Single 1"
Woofer:
Single 6.5"
On-wall Dimensions HWD mm:
345 x 244 x 91
In-wall Dimensions HWD mm:
244 x 106 x 86
On-wall Dimensions HWD inches
13.6 x 9.6 x 3.6
In-wall Dimensions HWD inches
9.6 x 4.18 x 3.4
Weight kg each
4.08
Weight lbs each
9

Executive Overview

For those looking for that great Axiom sound in a space saving package, the W3's offer just that. According to Axiom Audio, these speakers performance is compatible to their M3v2 bookshelf boxed speaker counterpart. What differentiates the W3's from other inwall speakers is that they come equipped with their own back boxes and can be installed into existing walls by simply cutting out a piece of drywall the size of their provided template and using their proprietary locking system to fasten it to the wall.  The end result is you have a speaker system in a small footprint that wont protrude past your wall mounted display or require bulky stands to rest on.  You can even order yours in a custom wood veneer finish to match your room décor for the ultimate Wife Acceptance Factor (WAF).

In this instructional video, I detail a step by step procedure with Axiom Audio Resident Expert Alan Lofft on how to install these new hybrid Inwall/Onwall W3 speakers into a wall and show how easy it is to accomplish this type of project in your own home. This instructional video takes you through the process, documenting the procedure and the proper tools needed to get the job done.


About the author:
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Clint Deboer was terminated from Audioholics for misconduct on April 4th, 2014. He no longer represents Audioholics in any fashion.

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Recent Forum Posts:

gene posts on September 26, 2007 19:58
I think that the wire was originally pulled through the drywall a bit too high. The plate was painted and covered the hole left originally.

Is that correct Gene?

The wires were run a bit too high. I didn't want to mount the speakers any higher so that is why I left the hole. The video was shot in one day and I didn't have time to replaster and repaint the wall. It has since then been completely repaired and looks great.
annunaki posts on September 26, 2007 18:07
I think that the wire was originally pulled through the drywall a bit too high. The plate was painted and covered the hole left originally.

Is that correct Gene?

Since it was only about 4“-6” of difference, why did not you just put the top of the template up to the top of the hole made by the wire. You could then have avoided that unsightly cover.
Jim Robbins posts on September 26, 2007 17:59
That looks like a pretty cool speaker, btw. I like the way it locks into the plasterboard. Btw, when I put some inwall speakers in my house, I used a Rotozip tool to cut the hole. It's like a super fast drill with a side cutting bit. You can set the depth to just slightly deeper than the drywall, then carve out your hole along the lines you have drawn. Only, the thing is very loud and it spins so fast it's kind of scary… *grin* Anyway, those axiom speakers will be on my short list next time I help someone with an in-wall install. Later…
ParadigmDawg posts on September 26, 2007 17:20
It looks like just blank, painted wall plates. Is there a reason for this or could you just put the speaker wire through the cut out?
hopjohn posts on September 26, 2007 17:12
Gene,
Interesting, sort of like a large mud plate, yet for speakers. Just curious what you did to cover up the small holes you had the speaker cable coming through initially. Noticed they were covered with something just above the speaker, but couldn't tell what you did there.
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