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Yale Shows Off Real Living Control4 Locks

by October 28, 2010
Yale Real Living Control4 Locks

Yale Real Living Control4 Locks

Yale Locks & Hardware unveiled the first lock specifically designed to integrate seamlessly into the digital home. The lock was introduced at the 2010 CEDIA Expo and we were impressed by the range of products and finishes available.

These new deadbolt and lever locks are the first products in the Yale Real Living portfolio of residential access control and home security solutions. Available with either a sleek capacitive touchscreen or pushbutton key pad, Yale's new platform of intelligent locks will be shown operating with Control4, the premier integration platform for today's digital home. In fact, the new locks support Control4's recently launched 2.0 user interface allowing the homeowner to directly access and control many of the lock's unique features. With the Control4 system the user can create personalized events or scenes triggered by the push of a button from anywhere in the home or remotely via the Internet.

The new locks support both Z-Wave and Zigbee, allowing them to integrate seamlessly into a wide range of home control and security systems. Features of the new locks include voice assisted programming in English, Spanish and French; personalized access-control scenes for up to 250 users; and access to all user programmable settings via the Control4 user interface. The new intelligent locks offer an elegant, next-generation access control solution for the home's entryways and protected interior doors to make everyday living easier and safer.

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Clint Deboer was terminated from Audioholics for misconduct on April 4th, 2014. He no longer represents Audioholics in any fashion.

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InTheIndustry posts on October 30, 2010 02:30
BMXTRIX, post: 762854
As I said, I applaud them for doing it. It's even better that it is an open source type of product that can have been tied into something that wasn't an entirely proprietary control system interface. But, they don't ship with that interface, or the gui to run that interface, or the integration of 12 of the locks in a home system… There's probably several days of work possible the first time this is setup in a large home with a dozen doors on it. Just for that one small feature. Cool to have it there though.

I also think that I pointed out that manufacturers have no interest in making this easy. You basically took 4.5 hours to program a remote control with experienced A/V guys. That's the same thing it has been for a decade. The toys and remotes are cooler, but it's still an experienced A/V tech with good knowledge and hours of work to get it going on a basic receiver, cable, bd, tv setup.

I'm plenty creative enough to know that IP is the way of the future, but I'm not so naive as to believe that manufacturers are going to standardize upon a reasonable protocol schematic that isn't going to require a bit of technical know-how to make it all go together.

Where it will go well is with the Harmony type stuff, only in an IP world, where it does all end up going together, but through a 3rd party working their tails off to make it happen. Not because the manufacturers actually are striving to make things easier.

I do agree that Crestron and AMX are expensive products, but I typically install B-stock items where for a few hundred bucks they can have that iPad/iPhone interface available to them with a free application with serial/IP/IR control as well for just a few hundred bucks in hardware. Unfortunately, if you don't have a Control4 system, I'm not sure how useful this new lock will be to your iPhone.

The manufacturers are building their proprietary systems as fast as they can with complete ignorance of integration and the importance thereof. You don't end up with an intuitive single user interface which can be navigated by J6P on his iDevice and the industry has taken no steps towards that as a whole. Just on the individual level.

In 2012, things will have advanced, but nothing will have converged, and without integration, you aren't one step closer than you were ten years ago. The difference being that it will be easier to integrate so cheaper, and far sloppier, solutions will be presented to confuse consumers even more.

As the saying goes: The more things change…

1st, I want to say that I agree with what you're saying on many levels in regards to end-users still needing programming expertise and know how. I also agree that integrators or “installers” who cobble together Frankensystems will end up bringing a bad name to automation and systems control. But….

That's where good companies/people come in. The reason it took so long was because we were just starting to get hands on with that type of software. Long term this app, for example, should program smoothly for us. Especially since the software allows you to store everything on a separate site (like Harmony) and mirror it from one system/interface to the next. Changes can also be made off-site and will take affect when the client syncs his iPad.

The Yale lock videos that I have seen show a multilock/label/tracking system that should be available through an online interface relatively soon (6 months). It seemed very straight forward from the vids but, yeah, I could see quite the learning curve for not just the locks but a lot of different types of equipment. Yale is supposedly making an iPad/Phone interface available by Spring 2011. It's also - right now - able to be controlled through ZWAVE & ZIGBEE, which can work with iPad/Phone & iRule app just fine. Although, until I buy & try… I'll always speculate no matter who says what. But after talking to iRule, they were incredibly confident ZWAVE & ZIGBEE devices can be integrated onto their app. So can X10.

Manufacturers don't need to do anything different to make this iRule work, & that's a great thing! The Global Cache pieces do the conversions from IP to IR/RS232 & the iPad sends out commands and speaks to other pieces on the network. So, as long as manufacturers keep putting IR & RS232 on their products, we should be all set.

I guess here's what I think is exciting with software/app based products like iRule: The more low cost, quality pieces that work reliably - the better it is for you & I. I could by a Yacht on the internet in 10 mins, let alone a speaker or piece of automation equipment. Things can be found cheap & easy if someone's willing to do the leg work & know where to look. So, how do guys like you & I stay in business and earn a deserved living?

Answer: Our brains. I would give equipment away for free if I could get it for free. My brain & expertise is where I make my money. So if companies like iRule & Global Cache can be combined to crush the entry cost of some really slick automation features…. even if it's a small one room system or specific area of the house like a basement, I'm all in. Think of how many clients past, present, and future that would benefit from & love some form of automation if it could be had at a reasonable cost.

Even if the iPad is only a really sweet TV remote for 90% of your clients, think of it this way: What does a decked out RTI or URC MX-6000 remote with all of the RF pieces typically cost? … Around $2Kish programmed or more? What's dealer cost on that, around $1Kish, right? So….about $1K profit. Well, how's this for value add…. iPad with IR ITACH piece = $610 in equipment cost. Sell it for $1800 programmed and you've just given your client an incredibly versatile remote, with the ability to expand and grow as their needs change AND you've increased your bottom line because instead of $1K you've made $1190. Oh, and by the way…. it does so much more than be just a remote for a family room surround sound system!

I just see so many possibilities for this kind of progression. Automation with some localized components (TV, receiver, theater equipment, etc.) as well as global pieces (lighting control, security, camera, etc.) that requires little out of pocket expense from a communications materials stand point just opens so many doors for our clients. I used to think that wireless would put us out of business but over the Summer I think it's going to end up doing quite the opposite. Remember: Boxes come & boxes go, but people will always need your brain.


PS: Sorry for the books I keep writing, but this is a subject that irks and intrigues me. I'm constantly working on things on our test bench to see what works and what doesn't. And where we can find better, more cost effective solutions for our clients while not taking anything away from their experience.
BMXTRIX posts on October 30, 2010 00:06
As I said, I applaud them for doing it. It's even better that it is an open source type of product that can have been tied into something that wasn't an entirely proprietary control system interface. But, they don't ship with that interface, or the gui to run that interface, or the integration of 12 of the locks in a home system… There's probably several days of work possible the first time this is setup in a large home with a dozen doors on it. Just for that one small feature. Cool to have it there though.

I also think that I pointed out that manufacturers have no interest in making this easy. You basically took 4.5 hours to program a remote control with experienced A/V guys. That's the same thing it has been for a decade. The toys and remotes are cooler, but it's still an experienced A/V tech with good knowledge and hours of work to get it going on a basic receiver, cable, bd, tv setup.

I'm plenty creative enough to know that IP is the way of the future, but I'm not so naive as to believe that manufacturers are going to standardize upon a reasonable protocol schematic that isn't going to require a bit of technical know-how to make it all go together.

Where it will go well is with the Harmony type stuff, only in an IP world, where it does all end up going together, but through a 3rd party working their tails off to make it happen. Not because the manufacturers actually are striving to make things easier.

I do agree that Crestron and AMX are expensive products, but I typically install B-stock items where for a few hundred bucks they can have that iPad/iPhone interface available to them with a free application with serial/IP/IR control as well for just a few hundred bucks in hardware. Unfortunately, if you don't have a Control4 system, I'm not sure how useful this new lock will be to your iPhone.

The manufacturers are building their proprietary systems as fast as they can with complete ignorance of integration and the importance thereof. You don't end up with an intuitive single user interface which can be navigated by J6P on his iDevice and the industry has taken no steps towards that as a whole. Just on the individual level.

In 2012, things will have advanced, but nothing will have converged, and without integration, you aren't one step closer than you were ten years ago. The difference being that it will be easier to integrate so cheaper, and far sloppier, solutions will be presented to confuse consumers even more.

As the saying goes: The more things change…
InTheIndustry posts on October 29, 2010 21:33
BMXTRIX, post: 762827
IP automation is not coming fast.

The problem is that every single manufacturer has their own solution and own idea of a solution. Nothing integrates seamlessly, and because manufacturers don't talk to each other, or often within their own organizations, there is little to no hope of true seamless integration anytime soon. I mean, in the next twenty years there is little to no chance of this occurring.

While you may have optomism, I have been an integrator for a decade now and have actually seen disparity in products maintain perfectly level status over the past ten years.

Philips, for example, the owner of the Pronto remote controls, makes TVs that can't properly be turned on/off within a macro directly. You have to ‘toggle’ it on/off with a single press because they don't know they should use discrete codes. From year to year we see Samsung change their IR codes. We have seen Sony come out with a network enable 400 Disc Blu-ray player, which doesn't even have a web interface on their ‘premium’ ES series model, and doesn't allow any control at all via IP.

In fact, the biggest use of IP by manufacturers to this date is for firmware updates and additional selling features such as Netflix.

Control is the LAST thing on their mind!

After all, that's what HDMI CEC is for.

Of course, that doesn't work either. Turn on the DirecTV box and maybe your receiver turns on, and maybe your TV turns on. But, it probably doesn't go to the right input. Worse, you turn on your Blu-ray, and the DirecTV stays on, and the receiver doesn't change inputs. Better go grab 2 or 3 remotes to get everything straightened out. Turn off the DirecTV and Blu-ray? Still have to manually turn off the TV and receiver.

I'm not trying to be pessimistic on this, but the reality remains that manufacturers don't have people actually putting something together which will work. They have their own, internal, idea of what will work, but that won't tie into your lights, or your security, or your… refridgerator. So, you have to come up with an external system if that is important to you.

At the most basic of the A/V level, this is why URC and Harmony are in business. They take the four standard remotes (TV, Receiver, Sat/Cable, Blu-ray) and get rid of them for one simple solution.

Manufacturers have had decades to get it all figured out and they still aren't even close.

Good to see this move from Control4, but really, any company with a controllable lock system (many are out there) could tie it into Crestron and AMX for years and I know I did this at least nine years ago in a residence with good commercial ‘controllable’ locks. Still gotta give it to them for just making something that integrates to their products a bit better.

I'm sorry, but this is where the Crestron & AMX guys are going to get a cold shot of water to the face. Technology is changing FAST. Why other integrators struggle to embrace or accept that when it's what drives our industry blows my mind. We should all be married to our clients and NOT to manufacturers or their ideals.

Manufacturers don't need to figure anything out. Software companies are doing it for them. Pioneer already has built in iPhone/Pad/Touch control in their new model receivers. But that’s already been blown away….

Global Cache + iRule App = Any device with IR, RS232, and/or an IP address to be put onto an iPad, iPhone, or iTouch. That includes cameras, security systems, motorized shades, lighting control, etc. This also allows for custom graphics, photos, etc. if desired.

That's right, for under $650 in hardware (the cost of $120 Global Cache unit & an iPad) & a $60 app, I can have IR (for example) control of whatever I desire. Fully macro'd, custom graphic'd out. Add a few more Global Cache pieces and an RS232 expander and a zigbee transmitter and now we've got multiple interfaces to work with for lighting control, etc. This app, for now, is one way communication only. I spoke at length with the owner of iRule (a great guy, BTW) about the inclusion of 2 way feedback. They're working on it & it should be ready in 2011.

20 years away? Try 2 months ago I bought two Global Cache ITACHs to mess around with. One blue RS232 & one red IR. I'd never used the iRule programming before but have done lots of Harmony & URC pieces, mind you. On top of that I have a top shelf URC programmer on staff who has a strong back ground with upper end automation projects to do the heavy stuff. In less than 4 1/2 hours of screwing around we had an LG 50" plasma, a Pioneer Elite receiver, an X10Pro socket dimmer, a Vutec motorized screen, & a cable box all being controlled individually by my iPad. It was our 1st time and I doubt that future programming will take as long on the simple stuff. We both felt that to go into macros from there wouldn’t have been too hateful at all.

As far as a BluRay player or anything else not having web interface… Where’s your imagination? Wireless USB to VGA into the display + cloud control (available through the iPad & iRule app) = All of the media server control & web access anyone could imagine. Which is to say…. all of it. Heck, the iRule app even allows us to embed URL web pages into the remote interface. So if you want to check fantasy football stats or a nanny camera in your kids room while keeping your TV controls handy…. go for it.

And have you heard about Furman's BlueBolt cloud based power management? IP & cloud control is all coming fast and at a pace & price that the server/hardware based companies like Creston, AMX, Control4 will not be able to react to.

We're going to really show this all off in our new electronic design gallery when we open it up at the end of next month. There are quite a few more apps we've looked at, but iRule seems to be the best - so far. It has a ton of features and flexibility that the server based automation pieces have – custom graphics (like taking a floor plan and making room-specific control buttons on it)… only this is driven by IP conversion & software.

Point is…. This is where IP based automation is NOW. Let alone a year and a half from today in 2012.

EDIT: Think about your last comment about locks tying into AMX or Crestron for years. Where's your head at? Nobody cares about the Crestron or AMX name except for the people who sell & program it. Integrators can now reach more consumers with this $400 Yale piece that does NOT need a high $ control system to work it. It's an affordable a mag lock that can be tied into reasonably priced automation systems on almost any size home. That's a great thing for the industry! See because before now, to do that was so outrageously expensive that it priced people way out.
BMXTRIX posts on October 29, 2010 20:22
IP automation is not coming fast.

The problem is that every single manufacturer has their own solution and own idea of a solution. Nothing integrates seamlessly, and because manufacturers don't talk to each other, or often within their own organizations, there is little to no hope of true seamless integration anytime soon. I mean, in the next twenty years there is little to no chance of this occurring.

While you may have optomism, I have been an integrator for a decade now and have actually seen disparity in products maintain perfectly level status over the past ten years.

Philips, for example, the owner of the Pronto remote controls, makes TVs that can't properly be turned on/off within a macro directly. You have to ‘toggle’ it on/off with a single press because they don't know they should use discrete codes. From year to year we see Samsung change their IR codes. We have seen Sony come out with a network enable 400 Disc Blu-ray player, which doesn't even have a web interface on their ‘premium’ ES series model, and doesn't allow any control at all via IP.

In fact, the biggest use of IP by manufacturers to this date is for firmware updates and additional selling features such as Netflix.

Control is the LAST thing on their mind!

After all, that's what HDMI CEC is for.

Of course, that doesn't work either. Turn on the DirecTV box and maybe your receiver turns on, and maybe your TV turns on. But, it probably doesn't go to the right input. Worse, you turn on your Blu-ray, and the DirecTV stays on, and the receiver doesn't change inputs. Better go grab 2 or 3 remotes to get everything straightened out. Turn off the DirecTV and Blu-ray? Still have to manually turn off the TV and receiver.

I'm not trying to be pessimistic on this, but the reality remains that manufacturers don't have people actually putting something together which will work. They have their own, internal, idea of what will work, but that won't tie into your lights, or your security, or your… refridgerator. So, you have to come up with an external system if that is important to you.

At the most basic of the A/V level, this is why URC and Harmony are in business. They take the four standard remotes (TV, Receiver, Sat/Cable, Blu-ray) and get rid of them for one simple solution.

Manufacturers have had decades to get it all figured out and they still aren't even close.

Good to see this move from Control4, but really, any company with a controllable lock system (many are out there) could tie it into Crestron and AMX for years and I know I did this at least nine years ago in a residence with good commercial ‘controllable’ locks. Still gotta give it to them for just making something that integrates to their products a bit better.
InTheIndustry posts on October 29, 2010 19:26
I have been researching this product since CEDIA. Was told they will have an iPad/Phone/Touch interface next year (was told Spring). I understand the apeal of Control4 TODAY, I really do, but IP based automation is coming and fast. The whole house server automation model is going to be a dinosaur for the common household by 2012, I would bet my house on it. Why would Yale go down one narrow path (Control4) and in doing so extremely limit themselves as to who will be able to use the full features of this product? Silly, to me.

As soon as they are IP addressable I'm all in on these. With a list price of $200-$400 the possibilities on who would find this useful and a good value are wide open. Too bad the interface isn't…. for now.

EDIT: I know it is ZIGBEE & ZWAVE compatible, but open IP would be the smartest thing to intergrate into these, IMO.
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