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Father and Son Successfully Send iPhone Into Space

by October 18, 2010
Hey, I can see my house from here!

Hey, I can see my house from here!

I love my dad. But he never helped me send an iPhone into outer space. I got gypped. Time magazine published one of the coolest amateur science experiments we've ever heard of:

A father-and-son team, and others from the “Brooklyn Space Program,” launched a weather balloon into the stratosphere along with an HD video camera that captured virtually the entire flight. The team placed some hand-warmers inside a specially built insulated capsule that held the camera and an iPhone, which, through its GPS capabilities, allowed the team to track it down once it landed.

The video shows it all (though unfortunately the batteries temporarily gave out due to cold about 2 minutes before touchdown). The team was made up of Max Geissbuhler, a 7-year-old, and his father Luke. To everyone's amazement, the camera landed just 30 miles away after flying over 90,000 feet straight up into near-outer space and enduring 100 mph winds before bursting its balloon and sailing home with a parachute. I don't know about you, but these beats any baking soda volcano or ant hill experiment I've ever seen in a science fair. Somebody needs to put this kid and his dad on Jay Leno!

Source: Time Magazine via Newsfeed.

About the author:
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Clint Deboer was terminated from Audioholics for misconduct on April 4th, 2014. He no longer represents Audioholics in any fashion.

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Recent Forum Posts:

woodsof posts on October 18, 2010 22:23
really,amaing job
davecraze posts on October 18, 2010 11:24
“To everyone's amazement, the camera landed just 30 miles away after flying over 90,000 miles straight up into near-outer space and enduring 100 mph winds before bursting its balloon and sailing home with a parachute.”

Perhaps you meant 90,000 feet straight up, not 90,000 miles straight up. 90,000 miles would have been about halfway to the moon from earth.
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