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Koss STRIVA First Impressions and Comfort

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The STRIVA system packs away into a convenient carrying case not much bigger than the headphones themselves. A small magnetized leather pocket holds your wires and the CAP and fits inside the case for the complete package ready to travel.

The headphones themselves look impressive. When you remove the glossy black-and-red headphones from their case you know you’ve opened something special.

A raised outer edge on the right ear-cup you’ll identify intuitively as a touch volume control adding to a space-age feel. I generally don’t like touch-controls,Koss STRIVA Pro especially when they’re not accurate. However, I’m willing to concede that these are well done. The touch controls are sensitive and take a bit of getting used to.

The earcups and headband are padded with soft black leather. The headband presses the earcups so tightly the delicate cushioning is definitely appreciated. I found the headphones too tight at first, they took some getting used to. The snug fit is a result of the design that wants to completely seal your ear to control air inside. I didn’t like the pinching and it was only after some adjustments and attempts to shape the headband around my big head was I able to wear them for extended periods. 

After listening to the headphones I understood the value of that seal.

Many traditional Koss headphones are of the "circumaural" design (over-the-ear), with earcups that completely surround the ear. The legendary 4AA model was known for great sound isolation. STRIVA Pro follows this headphone-design concept

These headphones tend to be able to nicely reproduce bass with some weight due to total control of the air between the driver and your eardrum.

The system ships with two long cables, one is a straight USB cable that can be connected to the AC plug for charging your headphones. The other is a wisp of a cable with a USB mini on side (that fits the headphones) and a 3.5mm jack for direct connecting your headphones. This kind of direct connection will bypass the headphone’s internal amplifier and using it this way doesn’t require the unit to be turned on and will not use any battery power. 

The only complaint among my first impressions of the unpacking was the thinness of the cables used for connecting the headphones. I have no problem believing they pass all the signals required to fully power the headphones. But I’d feel better about running leads that were a bit thicker. I’m afraid I’m liable to accidentally snap some of the included wires. 

 

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Recent Forum Posts:

Wayde Robson posts on July 12, 2012 07:07
corey, post: 893453
Re: your statement “Overall I applaud Koss on this step in the right direction for headphone technology.”

I don't see this as the “right” direction for headphone technology, as cheep local storage makes having a massive amount of high bit rate music in your pocket very affordable. 16 GB micro SDHC cards are under $10.

The best thing about the STRIVA system is surfing Internet radio. The randomness, you get a thin layer of choice in genre but then you're surfing through thousands of stations. It's that randomness that has an fun and addictive quality. You want to check out more stations, you want to hear what's next after hearing a song you hadn't heard in a long time or discovered a brand new song.

As for comparing it to storage…

There are two vehicles for mobile infotainment - brought in or beamed in. This is a beamed in solution. You may prefer brought in, but it's just a different vehicle. It's like… a pickup truck isn't a good option when what you want is a motorcycle.
corey posts on July 05, 2012 04:25
Re: your statement “Overall I applaud Koss on this step in the right direction for headphone technology.”

I don't see this as the “right” direction for headphone technology, as cheep local storage makes having a massive amount of high bit rate music in your pocket very affordable. 16 GB micro SDHC cards are under $10.
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