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Corsair SP2500 PC 2.1 Speakers Review

by March 02, 2011
Corsair SP2500 PC 2.1 Speakers

Corsair SP2500 PC 2.1 Speakers

  • Product Name: SP2500 PC 2.1 Speakers
  • Manufacturer: Corsair
  • Performance Rating: StarStarStarStar
  • Value Rating: StarStarStarStar
  • Review Date: March 02, 2011 04:10
  • MSRP: $ 249.99
  • Buy Now

Frequency response: 35Hz – 20kHz +/- 3dB
232 Watts RMS total power (FTC)
Subwoofer dimensions: 18.1 x 10.2 x 11.7 inches (46 x 25.8 x 29.7 cm)
Satellite dimensions: 4.25 x 4.7 x 6.25 inches (10.8 x 12 x 15.9 cm)
8” 120W (IEC60268-5 24hr continuous rating) subwoofer with durable rubber surround
Fourth-order closed bandpass enclosure design
Bridged dual 60 Watt class-D amplifiers with integrated DSP  for 120 Watts of power (measured via FTC “RMS” method)
Ultra-efficient integral power supply with 100V – 240V AC input
Bi-amplified, two-way design with detachable audio cables
3” 16W (IEC60628-5 24hr continuous rating) midrange drivers
1” 40W (IEC60268-5 24hr continues rating) ferrofluid-cooled silk diaphragm tweeters
56 Watts RMS per satellite (FTC)
- 40 Watt midrange class-D amplifiers with integrated DSP
- 16 Watt  tweeter class-D amplifiers with integrated DSP

Pros

  • No audible distortion
  • Excellent bass
  • Clear treble
  • Headphone out and Aux in on remote

Cons

  • Slightly recessed midrange
  • Low LCD quality on remote

Introduction

I'm always on the lookout for good PC speakers. The challenge, of course, is that most manufacturers are looking to squeak out decent performance from plastic and paper, without a terrible amount of engineering and certainly without the benefit of much power or attention to the things that define good quality speakers. Corsair has bucked the trend in a number of ways with the SP2500 PC 2.1 Speakers. First of all, they have a subwoofer the size of a small refrigerator. Secondly, they put out a couple of Class-D powered 2-way speakers. Compare this to most anemic plastic sub enclosures and "full-range" speakers. The other thing they add is a wired remote control with an LCD-screen and discrete control over subwoofer and satellite speaker volume.
About the author:
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Clint Deboer was terminated from Audioholics for misconduct on April 4th, 2014. He no longer represents Audioholics in any fashion.

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gliz posts on March 02, 2011 11:39
thanks for the additional info Gene. I work in IT and i am a take no chances with data kind a guy. I have seen some strange stufff happen. but that information helped. I could not find a good set of PC speakers and a price that my wifewould approve so I got a little t-amp from parts express and some speakers, works pretty good. Well the amp stopped working so they are sending me another. No biggie!
gene posts on March 02, 2011 11:15
It's understandable why they didn't shield the magnet of the sub. Shielding not only requires you to use a larger magnet to counter the loses of the bucking magnet, but it also takes up more cabinet volume and adds cost.

If anyone is placing an unshielded sub next to a computer (not recommended), at least orient the sub so the driver is orthogonal to the HD. Using right hand rule, point your thumb in the same direction the driver is in, and rotate your hand. The rotation of your hand shows you the orientation of the magnetic field.

Thus the cone of the driver should either fire directly towards or 180 deg away from the HD.

I once had a very powerful sub placed near a CRT (had no choice) and simply fired the sub drivers towards the side of the CRT and there were no magnetic field related issues.
Audioholics posts on March 02, 2011 10:23
I really don't think you need to shield a sub unless you are using a larger magnet or locating it in close proximity to hard drives or a monitor. This product has a smaller magnet and is fairly safe if you use your head. Don't stick your PC on top of it and you should be fine…
gliz posts on March 02, 2011 10:22
cwall99, post: 797071
I'm guessing they opted not to shield the sub because that's really only an issue with a CRT (at least that's what I've been led to believe - I read it on the internet, so it must be true). Since CRTs are, essentially, extinct (except on my home desktop), they're probably just saving on manufacturing costs on a feature that 99%, ok, 90% of the world doesn't need.

Hard drive are susceptible to magnetic interference far more than crts are data los is a real issue and for 250 shielding should have been included in all three parts
cwall99 posts on March 02, 2011 10:02
I'm guessing they opted not to shield the sub because that's really only an issue with a CRT (at least that's what I've been led to believe - I read it on the internet, so it must be true). Since CRTs are, essentially, extinct (except on my home desktop), they're probably just saving on manufacturing costs on a feature that 99%, ok, 90% of the world doesn't need.
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