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Yamaha RX-V765 7.2 Home Theater Receiver Preview

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Yamaha RX-V765 7.2 Receiver

Yamaha RX-V765 7.2 Receiver

Summary

  • Product Name: RX-V765 5.1 Home Theater Receiver
  • Manufacturer: Yamaha Electronics
  • Review Date: February 11, 2010 07:20
  • MSRP: $649.95
  • First Impression: Pretty Cool
  • Buy Now
  • 95 watts x 7 into 8 ohms (1 kHz)

  • Dolby TrueHD, DTS-HD Master Audio, Dolby Digital, Pro Logic IIx decoding

  • On-screen display

  • HDMI repeater (4 in / 1 out)

  • HDMI upconversion to 1080p
  • iPod integration (requires optional Yamaha YDS-11 or YBA-10)

  • Compressed music enhancer for MP3s
  • 2 component video inputs
  • YPAO speaker calibration and room optimizer
  • 4 optical audio inputs (2 TOSlink, 1 coax)
  • Assignable power amps

  • Surround speaker preamp outputs

  • Night Listening Enhancer

  • Digital ToP-ART design

  • 192kHz/24-bit DACs

  • Silent Cinema

  • 17-1/8"W x 6.75"H x 14-3/8"D

  • Weight: 24.3 lbs (29 lbs shipped)

  • Warranty: 2 years

Executive Overview

While you can get into an entry level receiver these days for under $300, there are some serious advantages to stepping it up a notch. If you want advanced functionality like video upconversion, higher quality amplifiers and advanced connectivity options, Yamaha's RX-V765, with its typical selling price of just $649.95 gives consumers a way to get into a fully-functioning HDMI-equipped AV receiver without breaking the bank. The receiver has four HDMI inputs, each of which are capable of reading and decoding the new high resolution audio formats. This provides a great way to feed four components into a newer HDMI-equipped HD television. Because these HDMI inputs decode the latest HD audio formats, you can all but say goodbye to optical or multi-channel 7.1 analogue audio sources. You can also say goodbye to switching inputs on your television, should you decide to use the 1080p up-conversion that comes with this receiver.

This mid-level product from Yamaha comes in at very attractive price points, and has several upscale features from the lower priced RX-V665. For one, the unit has a larger chassis and power supply (about 3/4" taller). For those of you more familiar with the Yamaha line-up, you'll recall that there was a couple of shifts in the product line in order to maintain the appearance of having the same price points as years past. One of those shifts was the move amplifier quality up a model in order to allow the addition of new features on down-line products that otherwise would not have been able to be placed on lower-end receivers. In the case of the RX-V765, it is similar in amplifier design to the RX-V663, whereas the RX-V665 has a scaled back power supply. The RX-V765 also replaces the Zone2/Presence channel spring clip connectors with real 5-way binding posts (the larger chassis actually gives them room to do this). If you want beefier power, the upgrade is well worth it.

There are no S-video inputs on the back of this receiver - but since we absolutely hate S-video (as far as the connector is concerned) we'll call this a bonus feature. Hopefully your sources, by now, are almost exclusively either HDMI or component video (red, green, and blue, for those of you new to home theater). There are no Speaker B connections on this receiver - but this is an excellent opportunity for those new to surround sound to experiment with using the more powerful Zone 2 instead.

Inputs and Outputs

The RX-V765 has plenty of inputs and even iPod functionality - thanks to a multi-pin docking interface that works with the optional YDS-11 or YBA-10 iPod/iPhone docks. Four S/PDIF inputs (two coax and two optical) ensure ample connectivity for legacy DVD players, cable set top boxes and a gaming system, but you are really in for a treat should you make use of the 4 HDMI inputs. There is even a set of 7.1 analogue multi-channel inputs for those who are opposed to HDMI on principle (we know who you are!) A couple of parallel subwoofer preamp outputs means that you don't need a Y-cable in order to use two subs - which we recommend whenver possible for better and smoother bass response.

RX-V765 rear

Check out the larger chassis and 5-way binding posts for Zone2/Presence

The RX-V765, along with all of Yamaha's other AV receivers, features their new Compressed Music Enhancer which adds back in the missing "air" or high frequency information to MP3 and other compressed music sources. Yamaha's Cinema DSP audio processing is firmly planted on this product, giving users the ability to customize the sound field to Rock, Jazz, or German Bathroom (OK, that last one is a running joke). Silent Cinema technology is also included and essentially makes it possible to hear large-scale surround sound through standard headphones. This is really ideal for late-night home theater listening when the rest of the family is asleep. This receiver also features an on-screen display and YPAO, for automatic loudspeaker setup and equalization with the included microphone. Yamaha's new line of receivers have switched from the traditional amber LCD front display color to blue. This is a big change which makes Yamaha's receivers look like, well, just about everyone else's.

Remote Control

RX-V765 remoteThe remote for the RX-V765, like many of Yamaha's mid-level remote's, is capable of controlling the receiver and other components like your Blu-ray player and television. Yamaha is big on functionality in some areas, and light on others. For example, Zone 2 control is built in and operates easily, but all of the sources are numbered instead of labeled, making it very difficult to remember what input handles which device. The remote is also not backlit, making it difficult to use in a darkened room and there is no real control over cableTV set-top boxes - a major flaw of Yamaha's remotes for some time now. Still, it will do in a pinch and you'll be able to add TV control and manipulate the basic functions of almost any DVD or Blu-ray player. It is not a learning remote, so if it's not in the code set, you can't control it.

Conclusion

Video upconversion to 1080p, binding posts for all speaker connections, a more powerful amplifier system, high definition HDMI audio support and a powerful Zone 2 system make the Yamaha RX-V765 a very compelling upgrade for your home theater. We've been talking a lot about the upgradability of many mainstream home theater-in-a-box system lately, and the fact of the matter is - you don't need to stay with the same brands when you upgrade a component. It's exciting to know that you can add a product from a different manufacturer and still have flawless interoperability and enjoyment of your system. If you are upgrading, or just looking for a quality HDMI-centric product, you should heartily consider this receiver from Yamaha. It balances power and price in a way that puts it into a real sweet part for the AV enthusiast- and all for under $650.

About the author:
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Clint Deboer was terminated from Audioholics for misconduct on April 4th, 2014. He no longer represents Audioholics in any fashion.

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Recent Forum Posts:

caper26 posts on June 09, 2010 11:18
Use the analogue audio connection as your input device (Audio 1 or 2). Select that as your input device, then hit OPTION on the remote. Change the VIDEO source to whatever your component is connected to (AV1 or 2). Problem solved. If you cannot do this, then a firmware upgrade is required to allow this method.
So basically you are using the Audio 1 (or 2) as the input device and assigning the video from another device (AV1 or 2) to it.
tillthedayson posts on June 09, 2010 02:29
Yamaha tends to have good equipment but i keep shocking myself setting it up is that just my stupidity or is that common
M Code posts on June 08, 2010 14:27
evandy, post: 703893
Hey, I took a look at Yamaha's site, and couldn't figure this one out, even from the manual:

Is there any way to configure the receiver to have a Component-Video/Analog-Audio input? I'll admit it: I have a Wii. I'd like to be able to use that option.

Yamaha in many of their latest AVRs did not permit the user to configure analog audio along with component video inputs such as the Wii..
However they since have come out with firmware updates that now allows this configuration. Check the Yamaha site, click downloads for more info…


Just my $0.00…
gene posts on June 08, 2010 07:18
've had this receiver on loan for a little while as a first look into home theatre. As a middle of the road receiver I was hoping it could replace my Harman Kardon HK-670 stereo amp - boy was I wrong. I've spent an evening flicking between the two, and the Yamaha is woefully lacking in midrange and bass for general music listening. The comment about it being “too forward” is also bang on - it's much to “bright” a sound. My wife summed it up, saying that it just wasn't relaxing to listen to. Perhaps I'm expecting too much, but I can't really justify an amp and a receiver. The HK-670 weighs much more than the RX-V765, and I'm guessing power supply partially contributes to a light weight bottom end.

Looping the pre-out on the RX-V765 to the HK-670 was a good compromise, as the pre-amp didn't appear to disturb the sound too much.

However, I haven't had much luck with the auto lipsync with my Panasonic Plasma (new) so the Yamaha is going back to the shop. Watching Iron Man on BluRay (through the RX-V765) had worse lipsync through the RX-V765 with HDMI Auto (lipsync) enabled than the Monitor Out on my Plasma. Disappointing.

Harman Kardon makes some nice A/V receivers now in the same price range as the Yamaha. You should look into one of those as an alternative.
once1234 posts on June 08, 2010 07:10
Disappointing

I've had this receiver on loan for a little while as a first look into home theatre. As a middle of the road receiver I was hoping it could replace my Harman Kardon HK-670 stereo amp - boy was I wrong. I've spent an evening flicking between the two, and the Yamaha is woefully lacking in midrange and bass for general music listening. The comment about it being “too forward” is also bang on - it's much to “bright” a sound. My wife summed it up, saying that it just wasn't relaxing to listen to. Perhaps I'm expecting too much, but I can't really justify an amp and a receiver. The HK-670 weighs much more than the RX-V765, and I'm guessing power supply partially contributes to a light weight bottom end.

Looping the pre-out on the RX-V765 to the HK-670 was a good compromise, as the pre-amp didn't appear to disturb the sound too much.

However, I haven't had much luck with the auto lipsync with my Panasonic Plasma (new) so the Yamaha is going back to the shop. Watching Iron Man on BluRay (through the RX-V765) had worse lipsync through the RX-V765 with HDMI Auto (lipsync) enabled than the Monitor Out on my Plasma. Disappointing.
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